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Grey Wolf - Canis lupus
#16
Red Wrote:From Reddhole:

Quote: [Image: 125.jpg]

[Image: 214.jpg]

This photo was in a previous topic and the measurments given by Dinococuta.

Puma :190mm in length and  133mm breadth
Wolf :  298mm length and 146mm in Wide

This is an  almost record sized wolf skull against a subadult male or a slightly above average mature female puma skull. They don't seem represenatative of general populations.

http://www.auburn.edu/cosam/departments/...estAge.pdf

For instance In this study with huge numbers measured the average skull from all areas (small southerly and large northerly pumas) for old males was 211mm in length. If we included only the largest subspecies It would be interesting to find a mean value.

This is a differnece of 21mm in length between average mature males and this specimen. 

Also the average male zygomatic width for old males was 145mm, the same as this huge wolf.

Wolfs on average do have proportionally larger heads but not anywhere near the scale of this picture.


The information I have on leopard skulls indicate they are much larger than puma skulls around 20% in length and breadth (and probably height) this makes them similiar in size to wolf skulls.


Although I find hunting abhorent Relaible hunting records from Boone and Crockett and SCI hunting (days free membership) indicate the largest ever recorded are 

Puma         16 4/16 inches (length plus width)
Wolf           18 10/16 inches
Leopard     19 11/16 inches
Hyena        20   1/16 inches

Interesting thread. The length of dinocrocuta's specimen is of near record size, but zygomatic width is about average for boreal wolves. Overall, I think something is off as the skull width is a relatively small percentage of skull length vs. most wolf skulls.

Here are some average wolf skull sizes for various regions male wolves 2 years and older. Column 1 is skull length and column 2 is skull width:

[Image: SkullMeasurementsofWolves.jpg]

The Northern subgroup averages 27.5 cm x 14.7 cm. Canis lupus occidentalis (Alaska/NW Canada) averages 27.6 cm x 14.8 cm. A sample of 34 Canis lupus occidentalis skulls from another study averaged 27.8 x 15.1 from another study. Canis lupus communis (Russia) averages 27.0 x 15.1 cm. All of these wolves average about 100-120 lbs. 

Here are average male leopard skull sizes. It says "all age classes", but the study says only mature specimens were used:

[Image: LeopardSkullSizes001.jpg]

Asian leopard had the largest skulls - 22.5 cm x 14.7 cm.

The largest wolf skulls from a study I've seen are slightly smaller than the Boone & Crocket records - 17.53 inches - 18.07 inches and are as follows:

[Image: RecordWolfSkullSizes002.jpg]

This study is 30 years old, so its possible larger skulls have been found since.

From data, I've seen the largest leopard skulls are likely larger than the largest wolf skulls. However, the largest leopard and cougars are approximately 1/3 larger than the largest wolves.  At equal weights, the wolf's skull should be larger.

Red Wrote:The dead wolf from McCargo first appeared in the population in winter 2005, and seems to have been a subordinate wolf from East Pack. 
Our thinking... for now... the wolf from McCargo survived the recent death of East Pack’s alpha male (see journal entry for 15 Feb). The wolf from McCargo seems not to have been welcomed by the new East Pack alpha male. The wolf from McCargo wandered his old haunts, avoiding the new alpha male as long as he could. Then finally on the 19th or 20th of January, he met his death at the teeth of the new alpha wolf, probably while his sister, the alpha female, watched. The alpha pair of Chippewa Harbor, the next most likely perpetrators, were nowhere near the scene during these days.

http://www.isleroyalewolf.org/wsjournal/...71CB6.html


Read more: http://carnivora.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=userrecentposts&user=reddhole#ixzz1jCFpJIkf

Red Wrote:On Jan. 29th, ID WS confirmed that a wolf attacked and injured two livestock guarding dogs on private land South of Riggins, ID. The attack occurred in the North Fork of Shingle Creek. One of the two dogs' injuries may be life threatening, the other has less serious wounds. The wolf responsible for the attack may be associated with the Lick Creek Pack. After consulting with IDFG, ID WS will begin efforts to lethally remove one wolf. The livestock owner was also be presented with the option to use fladry, if he desires, to keep wolves from his sheep and dogshttp://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/spec...022007.htm 

Read more: http://carnivora.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=userrecentposts&user=reddhole#ixzz1jGUb0Ouv

Red Wrote:The pictures below are from Dinocrocuta.

The wolf's skull is around 30 CM (just short of 12 inches) long, which is near record size. The cougar's is about 21.6 CM long, and adult cougar skulls range from about 16 CM - 24 CM. Thus, my best guess is both animals weighed around 150 lbs.

As you can see in the pictures below, the grey wolf's skull is much bigger and the canines are similar in size to the cougar's. The cougar's skull and teeth are on the left in each picture and the wolf's skull and teeth are on the right in each picture. 

[Image: WolfCougarSkullComparison.jpg]

[Image: WolfCougarCanineComparison.jpg]

[Image: WolfCougarCanineComparison2.jpg]

[Image: WolfCougarCanineComparison3.jpg]

[Image: WolfCougarCanineComparison4.jpg]

I think he would have had longer measurements for each canine if he used a tape measure which could bend along the curves of each tooth.

Red Wrote:Isle Royale Wolf Pair Kills Old Cow Moose

Wolf pair on Isle Royale killed well-nourished old cow moose. Isle Royale wolves are relatively small weighing about 60-80 lbs. and are a hybrid of grey (Canis lupus) and eastern/red wolves (Canis lycaon/rufus).The moose showed some arthritis in her hips, but that is typical for older moose and presumably other ungulates as well.

We found the tracks of two wolves on the harbor near the cabin.  They were left by the west-end duo – the pair of wolves we’d first seen scent-marking on the beach of Siskiwit Bay – as they had left the moose they’d killed about a week ago at a site about a mile north of the harbor.  We could hike in and perform a necropsy and collect scats.

AND

The carcass was of an old cow moose.  The bone marrow was full of white, flaky fat – a little like vegetable shortening.  She had been well nourished.  But her worn teeth betrayed her old age, and her hips showed signs of arthritis.

http://www.isleroyalewolf.org/wsjournal/...ntury.html

Taipan Wrote:From Titoedersu

Titoedersu Wrote:Good morning to all. I just joined, I'm Italian and I do not know English very well so I use an automatic translator. Congratulations to all for the data provided. I tried to open a new topic but maybe I have to wait. However, I think you're interested in this story: a wolf here in Italy, Isernia, so approached the house, a pit bull he faced but was immediately killed. Here the site with photos: http://www.geapress.org/ambiente/isernia...lery/24376 
My apologies to the moderators, but I did not know how to insert the news.

Great Find!

Translated using "Google translate"

[big][big]Isernia: Clash wolf - Pit Bull [/big][/big](photo gallery)
The expert: no alarm, the wolf is not a danger to humans.
Editorial | February 20, 2012

[Image: cop283-287x300.jpg]

GEAPRESS - Typically we are accustomed to hearing about fights between dogs, perhaps badly kept in a kennel, where animals that should not come into contact and eventually clash in some cases succumb.

The dog is a wolf. Molded and enslaved by the evolution of man imposed by custom. They communicate in a manner often inscrutable to non-experts. You stare, you study, launch signal, then establish who is boss. Usually goes smoothly, but when a wolf is no longer that tens of thousands of years and maybe it was preferred to the emergence of a dominant trait, it can also happen what happened in these days of extreme cold in the immediate outskirts of Rocchetta al Volturno, in the province of Isernia.

A wolf, a large male, came into contact with a Pit bull kept near a body. To have the worst was the dog. A wolf's canine has penetrated between the palate and tongue. Snow remained on the tracks of the collision. Blood, but also fingerprints, according to Dr. Anthony Liberatore, Director of Veterinary dell'ASREM (Molise Regional Healthcare Company), are unmistakably a wolf.

The dr. Liberatore is an expert on wildlife, and for him those tracks are likely to be linked to the large male often observed in places. A peaceful presence with which Dr. Liberatore came in contact.

"The wolf flees at the sight of man - refers to Dr. GeaPress. Liberatore - maximum ignores him and continues on his way. This worst case scenario. The wolf is not a threat. "

In recent days, the upper valley of the Volturno, were spotted several deer come down to the valley as a result of snow left. It had been found some dead, or (whether alive or dead) food for the wolf. Also in recent days, the State Forestry (see article GeaPress) had issued a statement where noted as the winter was really a happy season for wild canid. At the rigors hurt everywhere are his prey or herbivores that are for the weak and therefore more susceptible to predation of the wolf.

"The locals - adds Dr. Liberatore - do not feel in danger wolf. Problems can occur with grazing, but this should be carefully analyzed. There are unscrupulous breeder, especially among the elderly, but not always the case. "

Grazing, in essence, means sometimes abandoned pasture. Animals left at the mercy of events. Animals of little value, however, turn into a profit in the case of contributions or reimbursements. Some, then, are more at risk than others. It 's the case of horses, especially if foals. The solutions are there but sometimes it seems as if you do not want to take.

According to Dr. Liberatore electric fences give good results and I'm not so expensive as they say, at least compared to a normal fence.

"We must know how to do - report Dr. Liberatore - be careful not scattered on the ground and check the batteries. With the wolf can live with. There is a danger to humans and livestock for the solution there. " Just want it, in fact.

The wolf that has plundered the Pit Bull is not the only one of its surroundings. There are probably others but, as reported by Dr. Liberatore, there is no warning and there is no reason that there is. E 'already so for quite some time. We are right behind the historic site of the Apennines to whom we owe the salvation of the wolf. The National Park Lazio, Abruzzo and Molise. To return to live among the fables, or the days of Little Red Riding Hood and the big bad wolf, there is no just no need. Sooner or later this cold end. Ungulates resume possession of the high altitude pastures and the wolf will follow them. And 'so who knows how much time and many hope that this will continue to be so.

[Image: inverno-2012-044.jpg] [Image: inverno-2012-029.jpg] [Image: inverno-2012-027.jpg]

Copyright © GeaPress - All rights reserved 

Source : Translated Article
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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Messages In This Thread
Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:30 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:33 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:35 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:37 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:38 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:39 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:40 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:41 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:42 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:43 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:44 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:46 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:47 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:49 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 09:57 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:02 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:03 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:07 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:10 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:12 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:13 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:14 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:14 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:14 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:15 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:15 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:16 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:17 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:18 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:19 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:19 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:21 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:21 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:23 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:24 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:25 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:26 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:27 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:27 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:29 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:31 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 06-22-2018, 10:32 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 09-29-2018, 09:45 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 12-20-2018, 01:09 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Taipan - 03-30-2019, 01:12 PM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Canidae - 05-09-2019, 05:49 AM
RE: Grey Wolf - Canis lupus - by Canidae - 06-23-2019, 02:16 AM

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