Poll: Who wins?
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Tyrannosaurus rex
12.50%
1 12.50%
Ankylosaurus magniventris
87.50%
7 87.50%
Total 8 vote(s) 100%
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Tyrannosaurus rex v Ankylosaurus magniventris
#1
Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus  is a genus of coelurosaurian theropod dinosaur. The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is a fixture in popular culture. It lived throughout what is now western North America, with a much wider range than other tyrannosaurids. Fossils are found in a variety of rock formations dating to the Maastrichtian age of the upper Cretaceous Period, 67 to 65.5 million years ago. It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to the large and powerful hindlimbs, Tyrannosaurus forelimbs were small, though unusually powerful for their size, and bore two clawed digits. Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size, it was the largest known tyrannosaurid and one of the largest known land predators. By far the largest carnivore in its environment, Tyrannosaurus rex may have been an apex predator, preying upon hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, although some experts have suggested it was primarily a scavenger. The debate over Tyrannosaurus as apex predator or scavenger is among the longest running in paleontology. Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest land carnivores of all time; the largest complete specimen, FMNH PR2081 ("Sue"), measured 12.8 metres (42 ft) long, and was 4.0 metres (13.1 ft) tall at the hips. Mass estimates have varied widely over the years, from more than 7.2 metric tons (7.9 short tons), to less than 4.5 metric tons (5.0 short tons), with most modern estimates ranging between 5.4 and 6.8 metric tons (6.0 and 7.5 short tons). Packard et al. (2009) tested dinosaur mass estimation procedures on elephants and concluded that dinosaur estimations are flawed and produce over-estimations; thus, the weight of Tyrannosaurus could be much less than usually estimated. Other estimations have concluded that the largest known Tyrannosaurus specimens had a weight exceeding 9 tonnes.

[Image: latest?cb=20141128071025]

Ankylosaurus magniventris
Ankylosaurus is a genus of ankylosaurid dinosaur, containing one species, A. magniventris. Fossils of Ankylosaurus are found in geologic formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period (about 66.5–65.5 Ma ago) in western North America. Although a complete skeleton has not been discovered and several other dinosaurs are represented by more extensive fossil material, Ankylosaurus is often considered the archetypal armored dinosaur. Other ankylosaurids shared its well-known features—the heavily-armored body and massive bony tail club—but Ankylosaurus was the largest known member of the family. In comparison with modern land animals the adult Ankylosaurus was very large. Some scientists have estimated a length of 9 meters (30 ft). Another reconstruction suggests a significantly smaller size, at 6.25 m (20.5 ft) long, up to 1.5 m (5 ft) wide and about 1.7 m (5.5 ft) high at the hip. Ankylosaurus may have weighed over 6,000 kilograms (13,000 lb), making it one of the heaviest armored dinosaurs yet discovered. The body shape was low-slung and quite wide. It was quadrupedal, with the hind limbs longer than the forelimbs. Although its feet are still unknown, comparisons with other ankylosaurids suggest Ankylosaurus probably had five toes on each foot. The skull was low and triangular in shape, wider than it was long. The largest known skull measures 64.5 centimeters (25 in) long and 74.5 cm (29 in) wide.

[Image: ankylosaurus-info-graphic.png]

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Prehistoric Cat Wrote:Tyrannosaurus VS Ankylosaurus
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#2
I don't want to have to repeat myself but the T. rex eats ankylosaurus for dinner and can kill it easily with simple logic and tactics. Mismatch in favor of the giant theropod. T. rex has a nice tasty anyklosaur meal.
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#3
someone did a accurate size comparison of Tyranosaurus and Anky together on the old forum and i swear the average anky was quite a lot smaller than Trex.
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#4
Since the T. Rex is actually larger as far as I know I have to give it to the Theropod. T. Rex would have much more trouble with something its own size or bigger
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#5
Arbour & Mallon (2017) Wrote:To calculate the mass of Ankylosaurus, we used the QE function in the MASSTIMATE v. 1.3 package of Campione (2016) in R version 3.2.3 (R Core Team 2015). This package estimates body mass from combined stylopodial shaft circumferences using a scaling equation described by Campione and Evans (2012). For AMNH 5214, the smallest known Ankylosaurus (humeral shaft circumference = 315 mm, femoral shaft circumference = 363 mm), the estimated mass is 4.78 ± 1.22 t. For comparison, the estimated mass of AMNH 5404, a large specimen of Euoplocephalus (humeral shaft circumference = 244 mm, femoral shaft circumference = 278 mm), is 2.33 ± 0.60 t. Thus, Ankylosaurus appears to have been a substantially bulkier animal, even if its total body length did not greatly exceed those of its closest relatives (which is consistent with standard allometric scaling relationships of the vertebrate skeleton).

How heavy was the largest known Ankylosaurus, CMN 8880? With only an isolated skull available, it is difficult to be certain. However, it is possible to hazard a first approximation by isometrically scaling up stylopodial shaft circumferences from AMNH 5214 using width between the supraorbitals as a common reference. (Stylopodial shaft circumference very likely scaled allometrically in the genus, but there are too few specimens to determine a scaling coefficient.) In this way, we estimate that CMN 8880 might have weighed approximately 7.95 ± 2.04 t—about as massive as a large male African elephant (Loxodonta africana) (Colbert 1993)—but these values must obviously be regarded with due scepticism. Other published mass estimates for Ankylosaurus (Paul 1997), presumably using the smaller and more complete AMNH 5214 as reference, place the animal at approximately 6 t, although methodological details in these studies are lacking. Seebacher (2001) estimated a mass of just ∼1.7 t using his polynomial technique, which strikes us as excessively small for an animal of otherwise elephantine proportions.

http://www.facetsjournal.com/doi/10.1139...-2017-0063

If this is true, I think Ankylosaurus could be within the mass range of Tyrannosaurus. Its particular method of fighting is something that I would probably favor over a lot of other terrestrial animals in its weight range. So if they're similar in size, I favor Ankylosaurus.

However, I think on the old forum it was pointed out that ankylosaurids have ridiculously robust leg bones for their size, so I don't know if these estimates based on long bone shaft circumference inflate body mass or not.

Quote:T. Rex would have much more trouble with something its own size or bigger
Technically true...but not any more than with modern macropredators.
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#6
(08-20-2018, 01:31 AM)Mondus Wrote: I don't want to have to repeat myself but the T. rex eats ankylosaurus for dinner and can kill it easily with simple logic and tactics. Mismatch in favor of the giant theropod. T. rex has a nice tasty anyklosaur meal.

I totally disagree. An adult healthy ankylosaurus would win, because their species has evolved to fight back against predators, and ancestors of ankylosaurus survived this way through the entire cretaceous period. If they were unable do defeat predators in combat, they would be hunted down to extinction, and considering that ankylosaurus and t-rex actually coexisted, I vote for ankylosaurus. It would win most of the time. Predators always choose the weakest prey - juvenilles, old and wounded, but an adult healthy ankylosaurus is something that predators in their right mind would usually avoid.
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#7
Predators evolve to eat what they coexist with. Prey evolve in turn to survive with the predators they coexist with. One of these evolutionary facts is that prey outnumber predators by a large ratio.

If prey adapted faster than predators then predators would not be able to eat. T. Rex likely had ways to take down things like ankylosaurus with a decent modicum of frequency. Why else would they evolve robust bodies and heavily reinforced heads and necks with bone crunching bites?

At a glance nobody would believe a Wolf could solo kill a 1000lb Bull Elk yet it's happened on multiple times. Same principle likely applies here.
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#8
Of course tyrannosaurus did take down ankylosaurus, but not like a sandwich. Ankylosaurus has evolved to survive with predators like tyrannosaurus by being well-armed and well-armored to fight back, so an adult would be a way too hard kill. They were unable to run away, so if they would not win in those battles most of the time, they would be completely hunted down. Of couse, tyrannosaurus can defeat ankylosaurus. Technically it cat turn ankylosaurus upside down or try to crush it's neck with a strong bite, but my point is that predators are not 100% successful at hunting prey, and a prey that is specialized on combat would defend itself most of the time unless it gets weak or wounded. And it's hard to compare this type of prey to modern animals, as no modern animal fills the same niche in the ecosystem that ankylosaurus did. Survival strategy of bull elk mainly runnung for their life. Ankylosaurus is more comparable to glyptodon, as they share the same adaptations(armor for protection and tail for fighting), but unfortunately glyptodon went extinct as well as ankylosaurus. Only 10% of hunts are succesful for the predators, so ankylosaurus had to win at least 90% of these interactions simply not to be hunted down to extinction.
[Image: 1200px-Cryolophosaurus_skeleton_mount_FMNH.jpg]
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#9
Classic match-up.

More often then not I'd imagine the ankylosaurus probably driving the T-Rex away but not killing it though there'd be times where the T-Rex is able to win such as flipping the ankylo over.
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#10
(10-13-2018, 06:41 AM)Cryolophosaurus Wrote: Of course tyrannosaurus did take down ankylosaurus, but not like a sandwich. Ankylosaurus has evolved to survive with predators like tyrannosaurus by being well-armed and well-armored to fight back, so an adult would be a way too hard kill. They were unable to run away, so if they would not win in those battles most of the time, they would be completely hunted down. Of couse, tyrannosaurus can defeat ankylosaurus. Technically it cat turn ankylosaurus upside down or try to crush it's neck with a strong bite, but my point is that predators are not 100% successful at hunting prey, and a prey that is specialized on combat would defend itself most of the time unless it gets weak or wounded. And it's hard to compare this type of prey to modern animals, as no modern animal fills the same niche in the ecosystem that ankylosaurus did. Survival strategy of bull elk mainly runnung for their life. Ankylosaurus is more comparable to glyptodon, as they share the same adaptations(armor for protection and tail for fighting), but unfortunately glyptodon went extinct as well as ankylosaurus. Only 10% of hunts are succesful for the predators, so ankylosaurus had to win at least 90% of these interactions simply not to be hunted down to extinction.

You missed the entire premise.
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#11
Why would I? I realise that t-rex can take on an ankylosaurus, and I stated that. What exactly did I miss? Correct me where I'm wrong. Tyrannosaurus did hunt ankylosaurus, but statistically successful hunts are more rare than unsuccessful. I'm not a professional zoologist of course, so I could be mistaken, I don't deny it.
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#12
Ankylosaurus' tail like round shot . His tail very hard and can move very fast . This can easily break the leg bone of the T-Rex.

Already in a documentary, Ankylo broke T-Rex's leg ..

Also, Ankylo's all body protected by very hard armor ..

It's skeleton like tank ..

[Image: Euoplocephalus-tutus-1.jpg]

T-Rex can lose . 50/50 .
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#13
Heavy armor makes the ankylosaurus a difficult animal to attack.
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#14
Size comparison
[Image: LIIwrZz.png]
T-rex source
Ankylosaurus source
I scaled them using the scale bars provided by the creators. Both are scaled to the largest specimen i think (CMN 8880 and Sue)

Tough one i say. Personally i don't consider horns as effective 'killing' weapon but i'm not sure about the tail club since we have no modern analogy to compare to. Also, as you can see, Ankylosaurus looks 'small' compared to T-rex at lateral view but at dorsal view, Ankylosaurus is just as, if not even more massive than T-rex is.
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#15
^ Plus the fact that ankylosaurus is low to the ground gives it a small advantage. Tryannosaurus would have to lower its head by a great degree and attempt to bite down onto the body, the fact that ankylosaurus was quite wide only makes this more in the ankylosaur's favor. And that isn't even mentioning the armor nor tail club.
I'd say ankylosaurus wins at least 80% of the time.
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