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Boa Constrictor - Boa constrictor
#16
Report of attack of a Boa constrictor (Serpentes: Boidae) on Tyto furcata (Birds: Tytonidae) in Pacora, Panama.

In this note we report a belfry owl tyto furcata, formerly Tyto alba (Uva et al., 2018), of the Tytonidae family, which was depredated by a Boa constrictor of approximately 220 cm, on the morning of January 25, 2017, between 06:30 and 07:00 h . The event was observed by some collaborators of the Panama - United States Commission for the Eradication and Prevention of the Cattle Borer Worm (Copeg) when they went to their work walking through a road that passes right next to the fence of a rice field and that is located in the community of Pacora (09°05’16.7” N, 79°17’10.8” O). These people reported the time when a B. constrictor attacked and destroyed an owl (T. furcata) that was perched on trunks of the aforementioned fence. These same people narrated that the owl was quickly rolled up and suffocated as they watched as the owl flapped and struggled to free itself from the strong grip of the boa, however, it was strangled and subsequently devoured.

[Image: UWZKBA4.png]
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#17
Boa constrictor diet!

Daniel Granville biologist was surprised, on the afternoon of Wednesday (15), when the kitchen window of his home in Bonito, 300 km from Campo Grande, caught a boa devouring a teju lizard. "It was at lunchtime, through the window, we saw a strange movement in the yard, and we went to see, when we arrived, she was already suffocating the lizard," she says.
Daniel says that the snake, about two meters long, took about two hours to devour the lizard, which, according to him, was not much smaller than the snake.

[Image: cobra_1.jpg]

[Image: cobra_2.jpg]
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#18
PREDATION OF THE LIZARD Tupinambis teguixin (LINNAEUS, 1758) BY THE SERPENT Boa constrictor constrictor LINNAEUS, 1758 IN MATO GROSSO, SOUTHERN AMAZON, BRAZIL.

Boa constrictor constrictor is a primarily terrestrial and nocturnal snake, preying on lizards, birds and mammals. We recorded an instance of predation by an individual subadult of B. c. constrictor on Tupinambis teguixin lizard in Mato Grosso state, south of Amazon. Although B. c. constrictor is a snake with a generalist diet, ectothermic preys were consumed principally by immature individuals. In this paper, the record of predation of ecthotermic prey by an individual subadult of B. c. constrictor possibly may be related with large size of lizard T. teguixin.

[Image: CZZ5t2v.png]
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#19
Quote:B. constrictor is a dietary generalist that consumes a spectacularly wide taxonomic diversity of prey ranging from shrimp, fish, and lizards to deer, ocelots, and monkeys

https://www.jstor.org/stable/4092907?seq...b_contents
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#20
Boa constrictor diet!

The Rupornis magnirostris is a family of hawk acipitrids, found throughout Brazil. Like every bird of prey, it has an indispensable role in the balance of fauna as regulators of natural selection. This time, to his disgrace, he was selected by his predator, the boa (Boa constrictor).

[Image: 673062g.jpg]

The biologist Edson Moroni Vicente Cardoso Marques, passionate about nature, discovered a moment of tension and conflict in the animal world. A boa (Boa constrictor) attacked a group of red macaws (Ara) and managed to capture one of them.
The video, recorded by him when the bird was already "imprisoned", shows the snake's attempt to digest the macaw. Being still young, the reptile could not ingest its prey completely and the moment was flagrant.
After 30 minutes, the biologist saw the boa release the macaw without devouring it completely.



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#21
I decided to write in a booklet the amount of photos, videos and annotations of predation of the boa constrictor to its prey, these are the following prey and the number of photos, videos and observation data that I found:
(It also included data shared by forum members)

Mammals

Urocyon cinereoargenteus: 2
Atelocynus microtis: 1
Cerdocyon thous: 1
Speothos venaticus: 1
Eira barbara: 1
Puma yagouaroundi: 1
Potos flavus: 1
Nasua narica: 1
Dasyprocta punctata: 5
Kerodon rupestris: 3
Callithrix penicillata: 2
Didelphis aurita: 1
Chiropotes satanas: 1
Callicebus discolor: 1
Coendou prehensilis: 1
Alouatta puruensis: 1
Armadillo: 1
Mazama sp: 1
Ototylomys phyllotis: 1
Felis catus: 6
Canis familiaris: 3

Birds

Vanellus chilensis 1
Turdus rufiventris: 2
Tyto alba: 1
Patagioenas picazuro: 3
Chunga burmeisteri: 1
Ara chloropterus: 1
Pitangus sulphuratus: 1
Thamnophilus doliatus: 1
Buteo magnirostris: 1
Diopsittaca nobilis: 1
Cyanocorax cyanopogon: 1
Leptotila verreauxi: 1
Psophia viridis: 1
Dacnis canaya: 1
Volatinia jacarina: 1
chiroxiphia pareola: 1
Furnarius rufus: 1


Reptiles

Iguana iguana: 3
Tupinambis: 1
Ameiva ameiva: 2
Salvator merianae: 2
Tupinambis teguixin: 1
Tropidurus: 1
Salvator rufescens: 1

[Image: 6628308611_a13d18913b_b.jpg]
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#22
(05-24-2019, 11:59 PM)Shenzi Wrote: I decided to write in a booklet the amount of photos, videos and annotations of predation of the boa constrictor to its prey, these are the following prey and the number of photos, videos and observation data that I found:

Are you studying Zoology or is this a hobby for you? You certainly have provided excellent data for our profiles!
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#23
(05-25-2019, 12:40 AM)Taipan Wrote:
(05-24-2019, 11:59 PM)Shenzi Wrote: I decided to write in a booklet the amount of photos, videos and annotations of predation of the boa constrictor to its prey, these are the following prey and the number of photos, videos and observation data that I found:

Are you studying Zoology or is this a hobby for you? You certainly have provided excellent data for our profiles!

I am studying a bachelor's degree in biology and I only go for the first year, I want to leave with the title of study for mammalogy, it is 6 years of study. 
I like to share everything I know about animals with other people and that's why I joined this forum, I used to visit the forum when I did not have an account (the old forum), but I never dared to join, since I speak Spanish and very little English , but I ended up joining hahaha
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#24
BOA CONSTRICTOR OCCIDENTALIS (Argentine Boa).
DIET.

On 15 December 2008, we observed a free-ranging adult B.c. occidentalis (total length ca. 3 m) in Sierra de Guayaguas, 25 de Mayo Department, corresponding to the Chaco Árido Phytogeographic Region in Argentina (31.85°S, 67.17°W, datum WGS84; elev. 557 m). The snake was apparently in an ambush posture on the ground beneath the canopy of Ximenia americana (albaricoque) shrubs along a trail used by “walking birds” (Chunga burmeisteri; “chuña patas negras,” Cariamidae). Later, a C. burmeisteri that was passing along the trail was caught by a fast strike from the snake and was subsequently constricted and ingested over the course of ca. 25 min (Fig. 1). Boa constrictor are opportunistic predators that are known to feed on a variety of mammals, birds, and lizards, and are sit-and-wait foragers (Savage 2002. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Costa Rica. Univ. of Chicago Press, Illinois, 934 pp.; Solorzano 2004. Snakes of Costa Rica. Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Costa Rica, 791 pp.). This note constitutes a first record of predation on C. burmesteri by B. c. occidentalis and confirms that this snake uses ambush foraging to feed on “walking birds.”

[Image: VWdWF76.png]
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#25
BOA CONSTRICTOR (Common Boa; Jibóia). DIET.

During a diurnal survey on 12 December 2016, a subadult 
male B. constrictor (total length = 120 cm) was observed on the ground preying upon an adult V. chilensis in the area of Instituto Capixaba de Pesquisa, Assistência Técnica e Extensão Rural (INCAPER), municipality of Linhares, Espírito Santo state, southeastern Brazil (19.4174°S, 40.0792°W, WGS84; elev. 50 m). 
The snake captured, constricted, and ingested the prey head-first over ca. 20 min (Fig. 1A). However, the snake’s mouth was pierced by the spur of the bird (Fig. 1B, C). After attempting to reposition and swallow the bird for ca. 10 min, the snake rejected the dead prey and retreated with a bleeding wound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of predation on V. chilensis by B. constrictor.

[Image: Subadult-Boa-constrictor-preying-upon-an...forest.png]
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#26
@Shenzi: V. chilensis is a bird species? V. stands for which genus?
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#27
(05-25-2019, 10:29 AM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: @Shenzi: V. chilensis is a bird species? V. stands for which genus?

Southern lapwing - V. Chilensis

Genus: vanellus

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanellus

It is a very common bird here in South America, I always see them in the fields, when they are in breeding season or protect the chicks are very aggressive, once came attacked my dog and also usually attack the chimangos or caracaras, especially the guira that are constantly looking for eggs.
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#28
BOA CONSTRICTOR (Common Boa; Jibóia). DIET.

On 20 February 2016, at ca. 1723 h, in a pasture area near a coffee plantation, municipality of Cachoeiro de Itapemirim, Espírito Santo state, Brazil (20.680778°S, 41.094083°W, WGS 84; 151 m elev.), we observed the capture of a bird by a Boa constrictor. The bird, 
belong to the genus Furnarius (João-de-barro), was on a fence and flew to the ground to forage. We witnessed the B. constrictor(SVL ca. 1 m TL) approach in the grass and lunge at the bird. The boa captured, constricted, and ingested the prey headfirst overca. 30 min (Fig. 1A, B). There were other birds of various species resting on the fence (Fig. 1C), however no reactions among the 
birds were observed. Birds are the primary prey of immature B. constrictor and are also frequently eaten by adults (Pizzatto et al. 2009. Amphib- Reptil. 30:533–544). This is the first record of B. constrictor predation on birds belonging to genus Furnarius. Our predation observation supports the idea that B. constrictorexhibits both active search and ambush foraging strategies (Rodríguez-Robles et al. 1999. J. Zool. 248:49–58).

[Image: JydhEyO.png]
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#29
Predation on Iguana iguana (Squamata: Iguanidae) by Boa constrictor (Squamata: Boidae) in a fluvial island in the Amazonas river, Brazil.

On 19 October 2012, at 1347 h, during a field 
trip to Reserva Biológica do Parazinho (0.875° N, 
49.987° W; WGS84), a fluvial island and part of the 
Islands of Bailique in the municipality of Macapá, 
and the Amazon River Basin, Brazil, we found an 
individual of B. constrictor in the process of ingest-
ing a common green iguana (I. iguana), swallowing 
the headfirst (Fig. 1) on an upland forest. We pho-
tographed the event and continued to observe the 
ingestion process for about 30 minutes.


[Image: MFKX0jB.png]
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#30
BOA CONSTRICTOR IMPERATOR (Boa Constrictor). DIET. 

On 8 April 2010 at 1257 h, a juvenile female B. c. imperator (SVL = 540 cm, tail length = 52 mm, 68 g) from Miramar, Salango, province of Manabí, Ecuador (1.59612°S, 80.84045°W, WGS 84; 44 m elev.) was found constricting and swallowing an adult female 
Medopheus edracanthus (SVL = 82 mm, tail length = 143 mm, 18 g; Fig. 1). The B. c. imperator was released but the M. edracanthus was deposited in the Herpetological Collection, Fundación Herpetológica Gustavo Orcés (FHGO 13489).

[Image: HMC2zRp.png]



Boa constrictor (Reptilia, Serpentes, Boidae): opportunistic predation on Diopsittaca nobilis (Aves, Psittacidae).


On 6 August 2015, at 09:06 hrs, a B. constricto was observed capturing an adult Diopsittaca nobilis, Psittacidae (red-shouldered macaw). The snake, born in the Biological Museum of Instituto Butantan (SVL 1480mm; VTL 150mm; mass 3530g) in 2007, was 
regularly fed on rodents. The enclosure is open to the 
public for visits and altogether houses 20 B. constrictor, although the predation attempts were observed in a single snake. The enclosure has a ground area of 386.22m2 but has no overhead cover. The snakes are confined by a 1.8m high wall (Fig. 1). The enclosure is provided with shelters, a pond (length 3.7m, width 1.0m) and also flowing fresh 
water. Vegetation consists of large palm trees shrubs and underbrush. The presence of shrubs and trees allows free vertical movement of the snakes and thus they are able to select places of refuge, rest and ambush. Frequent pruning of branches next to the enclosure wall minimises escapes.
The Boa had been seen resting on a palm tree (Caryota urens), at a height of 11m, hidden among foliage and hence was difficult to detect. When a D. nobilis flew into Figure 1. Partial view of the snake enclosure at Instituto Butantan.Figure 2. B. constrictor beginning ingestion of Diopsittaca nobilis. The enclosure and perched close by, the snake seized it by constriction, suffocated it and, in a few minutes, started swallowing the prey headfirst. The process took exactly 101 minutes for full ingestion (Fig. 2). The subject remained at the same location for 15 days following the ingestion event. On 13 November 2015, the same snake, identified by body pattern, in the same palm tree at a similar height to the previous event captured a second adult D. nobilis. The snake seized the bird at 08:08 hrs, constricted it, killed it by suffocation and started ingesting headfirst but appeared to be having difficulty swallowing the prey. At 10:09 hrs, the head was only partly ingested and at 10:20 hrs, little more than 2 hours after capture, feeding was abandoned and the prey left among the palm leaves. On the same day, at 16:40hrs, the dead bird was sighted in the same place. On the morning of 16 November 2015, the prey was found on the enclosure floor and biometric measurements were taken; exposed culmen 34.6mm; head 48.3mm; wing chord 185mm; total length 331mm.
Observations of predation on adult psittacids by 
B. contrictor are unusual, probably due to their size, flight 
ability and intense flock vigilance (Begotti & Filho, 2011). 
After the predation events part of the flock remained 
relatively close to the event, emitting vocal alarm signals 
for a few minutes. The B. contrictor may have used the 
same palm tree because it is frequented by birds, and offers effective camouflage and shade from the sun, including for a large snake.

[Image: Partial-view-of-the-snake-enclosure-at-I...rictor.png]

Fatal attack on an adult Chestnut-fronted Macaw Ara severus by a Boa constrictor in the brazilian Amazon.

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication...ian_Amazon
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