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Snakes vs mammalian predators
#1
I think there was a thread on the old forum like this, let's start again in here.

[Image: GynfvIal.jpg]
Leopard with southern rock python
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#2
Taipan Wrote:HB V Venomous Snakes






"Living up to its name, this clip is another from their remarkable Caught in the Act series. In it a Honey badger takes on an adult southern African python. Grossly outmatched in both size and weight, you’d think the much smaller animal wouldn’t stand a chance against such a formidable opponent. Had it been the middle of the day – and hot – you’d be right. But unfortunately for this snake, its fearless attacker came upon it at night when its cold blood had slowed its movements down to something approximating molasses."
http://blog.malamala.com/index.php/2011/...-a-python/





From the HB profile:

Kifaru Wrote:•We must have spent most of the morning with these beautiful spotted cats before we headed to a nearby hill for a pit stop. There our ranger found the track of a large python! We followed it to another hill and found the snake badly injured. At first we thought it was dead, but as we approached it became clear that there was still some life in the feisty creature. After a bit of investigation it became clear that a honey badger was to blame for the injuries and shortly after we found two of these curious looking animals not far from where their victim lay

Kifaru Wrote:•A large dead python was found, the rangers say its cause of death was by a honey badger, which is surprisingly hard to believe, as this python was three meters long. But honey badgers are fearless; they display considerable aggression and have a powerful bite. Their loose skin enables them to turn easily upon anything that attempts to take hold of them.

Kifaru Wrote:•The most amazing sight this morning was a honey badger catching and eating an almost three meter long python. The badger had eaten a substantial part of the middle section of the python when the badger spooked for something and dived down a hole close by. The python then, Lazarus-like, dragged its body down the hole as well! What ghoulish events were happening underground we could only guess!

Kifaru Wrote:•A Honey Badger was seen killing a large python (estimated at three or more metres long) this month. This happened after sunset and the snake was deep inside a hole when the honey badger was found trying to pull it out. Once the python was out of the hole, the badger began to attack it from behind. First the snake lunged at the attacker three or four times trying to defend itself but each time the honey badger moved away and continued his attack from the rear. After about half an hour, the snake gave up the offensive and tried, in vain, to climb a small tree in an effort to escape. But the badger, seeing what was happening, dragged the python by the tail into a small clearing where it killed it and started to feed. This scene, however, was disturbed when a hyaena appeared. The badger initially chased it off, but later, both animals were seen rolling on the dead snake before the hyaena left the area The following morning, drag-marks indicated that the Honey Badger had taken its prize into a hole nearby.

Taipan Wrote:Honey Badger v African Rock Python

[Image: HB_v_ARP_zpsbxhgs8af.jpg]

[Image: HB_V_ARP_2_zpsy0os5a02.jpg]

http://singita.com/wp-content/uploads/20...v-2015.pdf
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#3
(08-20-2018, 09:19 PM)ChocolateCake123 Wrote: Have southern rock pythons ever eaten leopards?
Also, I heard a sun bear got eaten by a python once

Not that I'm aware of.
Yes, a large retic did killed and eaten an old and emaciated female sun bear, weighting less than 20kgs.
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#4
Photo 
Female jaguar and her cub with an yellow anaconda kill
[Image: 41488584_10155600441261073_1242034263453...e=5C1CC11A]
[Image: 41402389_10155600441266073_9045950781852...e=5C2CA65B]
[Image: 41344179_10155600441366073_8144973085326...e=5C1BBE4B]
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#5
Pantanal jaguar dragging a Green anaconda.
[Image: jx2B2Iz.jpg]
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#6
Is the classic Mongoose vs Venomous Snake matchup allowed here or is this strictly mammals vs constrictors?


[Image: Grant-Atkinson-Chiefs-Camp-_Y8A4541.CR2_0276.jpg]
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#7
Well it's not specified what kind of snakes are excluded, so any is alright I guess.

[Image: Nottins-python-pic-1.jpg]
[Image: bao08_NXZY.jpg]
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#8
(09-12-2018, 09:32 AM)Aztec Wrote: Well it's not specified what kind of snakes are excluded, so any is alright I guess.

[Image: Nottins-python-pic-1.jpg]
[Image: bao08_NXZY.jpg]
Anyone remember that terrible show "animal face off"? Wonder how they feel watching these images. Were those anacondas fully grown?
[Image: Grant-Atkinson-Chiefs-Camp-_Y8A4541.CR2_0276.jpg]
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#9
Jaguar agaisnt a yellow anaconda.




(09-12-2018, 09:38 AM)K9Bite Wrote:
(09-12-2018, 09:32 AM)Aztec Wrote: Well it's not specified what kind of snakes are excluded, so any is alright I guess.

[Image: Nottins-python-pic-1.jpg]
[Image: bao08_NXZY.jpg]
Anyone remember that terrible show "animal face off"? Wonder how they feel watching these images. Were those anacondas fully grown?

Those aren't anacondas but rather rock pythons killed by leopards, but yeah I would favor the jaguar over a Green anaconda more often than not.
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#10
Predation of an adult puma by an anaconda in southeastern Brazil
We report the predation of a puma Puma concolor by an adult anaconda Eunectes murinus that occurred in south-eastern Brazil. Despite the death of both animals, the incident raises important questions regarding the role they play in their respective niches in the wild.We report here a natural predation event of an adult female puma by an adult anaconda that occurred in the municipality of Promissão, on the north-western border of São Paulo state, Brazil. The incident was discovered when monitoring an adult female puma through radiotelemetry, as part of a research project on pumas, along the margins of a hydroelectric dam, on the lower Tietê riverbasin. The study is the result of a partnership between the Pró-Carnívoros Institute and the Hydroelectric Power Company AES Tietê, a subsidiary of AES Corp. (SISBIO Licence # 45774-1). The goal of the study is to evaluate the environmental health of the areas under the influence of AES Tietê, using the puma as a conservation tool, through the assessment, evaluation, and monitoring of their population in the study area. The study animal referred to in this report was an adult female, captured on 5 July 2015, with a weight of 42 kg. The permanent dentition showed teeth in excellent shape, with no excessive wear, and her age was estimated at 4-5 years. After equipped with a GPS/satellite radio collar (Sirtrack, NZ), she was released at the capture site. Until early October, we collected 2,053 locations of this cat, comprising an area of 30 km2, which suggests she was a resident female used to prey upon a thriving population of capybaras Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, as shown by the prevalence of this species in more than 20,000 wildlife photographs taken by our camera traps (53%, n = 12,215 photos of capybaras). On 8 October 2015, the radio collar stopped sending locations to the satellite. After discussion with the manufacturer and testing its voltage to discard a possible temporary malfunction, we found it had actually stopped working. On 24 October we sent our field team to check the vicinity of her last coordinates, searching for the VHF signal of the collar. After detecting the VHF signal with a handheld receiver and a directional antenna, our team homed in and found the signal was coming from inside a ditch in a cattail patch, in high grass vegetation within a matrix of sugarcane. As they approached, it became clear that the signal was coming from the water. Assuming at this point that someone had killed the puma and discarded the collar, they waded in, to search for it. To their surprise, they found a large anaconda, measuring 4.20 m and weighing 94 kg (as later verified), in the shallow water (Fig. 1). Apparently, the puma had been swallowed by the anaconda. 

[Image: q10KaRE.png]
[Image: 172CcO0.png]

As we needed to recover the radio collar, our field team, under our instruction, carefully captured the anaconda, aiming to keep it under observation in an adequate location until it regurgitated the collar. With a rope, the anaconda was lassoed and lifted onto the back of a pickup truck. During this operation, which lasted approximately 15 minutes, the snake was unusually apathic. Therefore, it was no surprise to find that, unfortunately, the anaconda died after a few minutes. When informed of this, we decided to take it immediately to the Bauru Zoological Park, in the town of Bauru, SP, to conduct a necropsy by qualified veterinarians (Fig. 2). According to the necropsy report, the macroscopic diagnosis showed pulmonary congestion with presence of parasites, oral necrosis, hepatic impairment caused by disruption of the liver, and parasitic tapeworm infestation in the intestine. Thus, it was clear that the ease with which the animal was captured was due to the fact that it was highly debilitated and in state of imminent death. 
Macroscopic examination of the carcass revealed multiple injuries, most certainly inflicted during the fight with the puma. We cannot affirm how the meeting between the anaconda and puma started. However, the evidence suggested a significant fight, whereby the felid proved to be a formidable opponent to the reptile. There were several external claw and tooth injuries on the snake, on the head, mouth, along the back and tail, as well as serious internal injuries, including lacerations on the liver (Fig. 3). Although the following is only speculation, it is interesting to note that the anaconda was missing a considerable portion of the tail, from some previous event, which had completely healed. Since this stump sustained several fresh claw and tooth marks, it is possible that the cat mistook it for the head of the snake, during the fight, serving as a distraction that may have given a crucial advantage to the anaconda. Despite its unfortunate end (Fig. 4), the incident raises important questions regarding the natural 
relationships between these formidable predators, and the role they play in their respective niches in the wild. Anacondas have been reported to prey on  large prey, such as capybaras, caiman Caiman sp., and even domestic dogs Canis familiaris, calves Bos taurus and sheep Ovis aries, but records like the one we describe here are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first record of an anaconda preying on a top predator like the puma.

http://procarnivoros.org.br/wp_ipc/wp-co...Brazil.pdf




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#11
Jackal kills snake:

Black Backed Jackal kills and eats Mole Snake.

[Image: BuNNbGl.jpg]

[Image: HqMPJV2.jpg]


[Image: W2pq2n2.jpg]
[Image: FNLNvga.jpg]

[Image: Eq6i1bg.jpg]

[Image: 0tCFmgB.jpg]

[Image: VD2eOhQ.jpg]

[Image: 0VHtEcc.jpg]

Coyote is seen devouring his meal.

[Image: Fyp2ozU.jpg][Image: YQVzlJV.jpg]

[Image: Fyp2ozU.jpg]

Source: http://www.wildcard.co.za/kgalagadi-jack...les-snake/
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#12
[Image: 44550570_307319846526862_376389545963509...Nw%3D%3D.2]Jaguar preys on anaconda
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#13
Tayra 

https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/video.../558469625

https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/video.../558469627
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#14
[Image: a29ae533dc74f60161c27bba47c0353c.jpg]

[Image: A-35m-long-yellow-anaconda-in-the-constr...ved-by.png]
[Image: While-harassed-by-one-of-the-pampas-foxe...elf-in.png]
[Image: The-anaconda-has-already-swallowed-half-...ion-of.png]
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#15
(09-12-2018, 04:41 PM)Aztec Wrote: Predation of an adult puma by an anaconda in southeastern Brazil
We report the predation of a puma Puma concolor by an adult anaconda Eunectes murinus that occurred in south-eastern Brazil. Despite the death of both animals, the incident raises important questions regarding the role they play in their respective niches in the wild.We report here a natural predation event of an adult female puma by an adult anaconda that occurred in the municipality of Promissão, on the north-western border of São Paulo state, Brazil. The incident was discovered when monitoring an adult female puma through radiotelemetry, as part of a research project on pumas, along the margins of a hydroelectric dam, on the lower Tietê riverbasin. The study is the result of a partnership between the Pró-Carnívoros Institute and the Hydroelectric Power Company AES Tietê, a subsidiary of AES Corp. (SISBIO Licence # 45774-1). The goal of the study is to evaluate the environmental health of the areas under the influence of AES Tietê, using the puma as a conservation tool, through the assessment, evaluation, and monitoring of their population in the study area. The study animal referred to in this report was an adult female, captured on 5 July 2015, with a weight of 42 kg. The permanent dentition showed teeth in excellent shape, with no excessive wear, and her age was estimated at 4-5 years. After equipped with a GPS/satellite radio collar (Sirtrack, NZ), she was released at the capture site. Until early October, we collected 2,053 locations of this cat, comprising an area of 30 km2, which suggests she was a resident female used to prey upon a thriving population of capybaras Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, as shown by the prevalence of this species in more than 20,000 wildlife photographs taken by our camera traps (53%, n = 12,215 photos of capybaras). On 8 October 2015, the radio collar stopped sending locations to the satellite. After discussion with the manufacturer and testing its voltage to discard a possible temporary malfunction, we found it had actually stopped working. On 24 October we sent our field team to check the vicinity of her last coordinates, searching for the VHF signal of the collar. After detecting the VHF signal with a handheld receiver and a directional antenna, our team homed in and found the signal was coming from inside a ditch in a cattail patch, in high grass vegetation within a matrix of sugarcane. As they approached, it became clear that the signal was coming from the water. Assuming at this point that someone had killed the puma and discarded the collar, they waded in, to search for it. To their surprise, they found a large anaconda, measuring 4.20 m and weighing 94 kg (as later verified), in the shallow water (Fig. 1). Apparently, the puma had been swallowed by the anaconda. 

[Image: q10KaRE.png]
[Image: 172CcO0.png]

As we needed to recover the radio collar, our field team, under our instruction, carefully captured the anaconda, aiming to keep it under observation in an adequate location until it regurgitated the collar. With a rope, the anaconda was lassoed and lifted onto the back of a pickup truck. During this operation, which lasted approximately 15 minutes, the snake was unusually apathic. Therefore, it was no surprise to find that, unfortunately, the anaconda died after a few minutes. When informed of this, we decided to take it immediately to the Bauru Zoological Park, in the town of Bauru, SP, to conduct a necropsy by qualified veterinarians (Fig. 2). According to the necropsy report, the macroscopic diagnosis showed pulmonary congestion with presence of parasites, oral necrosis, hepatic impairment caused by disruption of the liver, and parasitic tapeworm infestation in the intestine. Thus, it was clear that the ease with which the animal was captured was due to the fact that it was highly debilitated and in state of imminent death. 
Macroscopic examination of the carcass revealed multiple injuries, most certainly inflicted during the fight with the puma. We cannot affirm how the meeting between the anaconda and puma started. However, the evidence suggested a significant fight, whereby the felid proved to be a formidable opponent to the reptile. There were several external claw and tooth injuries on the snake, on the head, mouth, along the back and tail, as well as serious internal injuries, including lacerations on the liver (Fig. 3). Although the following is only speculation, it is interesting to note that the anaconda was missing a considerable portion of the tail, from some previous event, which had completely healed. Since this stump sustained several fresh claw and tooth marks, it is possible that the cat mistook it for the head of the snake, during the fight, serving as a distraction that may have given a crucial advantage to the anaconda. Despite its unfortunate end (Fig. 4), the incident raises important questions regarding the natural 
relationships between these formidable predators, and the role they play in their respective niches in the wild. Anacondas have been reported to prey on  large prey, such as capybaras, caiman Caiman sp., and even domestic dogs Canis familiaris, calves Bos taurus and sheep Ovis aries, but records like the one we describe here are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first record of an anaconda preying on a top predator like the puma.

http://procarnivoros.org.br/wp_ipc/wp-co...Brazil.pdf
the fight between 29 kg south american (brazilian) female puma and 94 kg green anaconda in the water offcource odds in the favor of green anaconda and secondly mistake by puma that on record anaconda was missing a considerable portion of the tail, from some previous event, which had completely healed. Since this stump sustained several fresh claw and tooth marks, it is possible that the cat mistook it for the head of the snake, during the fight, serving as a distraction that may have given a crucial advantage to the anaconda
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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