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Eagle vs vulture, pictorial and videos
#1


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#2


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#3
martial eagle kills vulture



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#4
The hooded vulture is the 2nd weakest vulture in Africa after the Egyptian vulture. I think the martial eagle can dominate all except the lappet faced vultures.
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#5
[Image: 44638fc0fd2af0152e03d9bc82dc3b9f.jpg]

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#6
(03-04-2019, 07:44 AM)Shenzi Wrote: Nestling White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) eaten by a Verreaux’s Eagle (Aquila verreauxii) at a nest occupied for a record 21 years.

Abstract
An adult Verreaux’s Eagle (Aquila verreauxii) was observed eating a White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) nestling at a nest at Sango in the Savé Valley Conservancy, south-eastern Zimbabwe
on 13 October 2017. This nest has been regularly occupied for 21 successive breeding seasons. To our knowledge, this observation represents a previously unrecorded species in the diet of Verreaux’s Eagle, and it is also apparently the longest known continually-occupied White-backed Vulture nest.

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There are two Verreaux’s Eagle nesting sites 
at Sango, located 13 km apart in granite hills
where there are good numbers of Rock Hyrax 
(Procavia capensis) and Bush Hyrax 
(Heterohyrax brucei), which make up most of 
these eagles’ diet in Zimbabwe (Chiweshe 
2007). One of these nests is at Vuma Hills and the other is on a hill near Mafushwa, south of 
Sango Lodge. In 2017, both pairs of eagles 
successfully fledged a chick (pers. obs.). 
The observation took place on 13th October 
2017, at a White-backed Vulture nest that is 8 
km from the closest Verreaux’s Eagle nest. This particular White-backed Vulture nest is in a Baobab, and is well-monitored because it is 
situated along a road that is regularly used. This nest has been occupied every year since D.G. began working at Sango on 1 Dec 1997, which 
means that it has been continually occupied for 
at least 21 breeding seasons; from the austral winter of 1998 to that of 2018, inclusive (pers. 
obs.). The Verreaux’s Eagle (currently 
classified as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, BirdLife International 2016a) was first noticed on the White-backed Vulture nest at 06h00 by L.C., who photographed the eagle on the nest (Fig 1). L.C. reported the sighting and B.C and D.G. arrived at the site at 07:55 am. By then, the eagle had a full crop, and had moved off the nest but was still perched close to it. A drone (model: Mavic©, DJI, Shenzhen, China) was used to inspect the nest, to determine what had happened to the vulture chick. The images taken by the drone revealed that the eagle had consumed the majority of the nearly full-grown vulture chick (Fig 2). The eagle appeared unconcerned by the drone, and eventually flew away at 08:25 am.

Table 1: Species recorded in the diet of Verreaux’s Eagles (Aquila verreauxii).

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Verreaux’s Eagles may feed on carrion and they may kleptoparasitise other raptors, and while we have tried to exclude such records from this table, the remains found at nests may include animals that were scavenged as well as those that were killed (Steyn 1982). References: a = Armstrong and Avery (2014), b = Boshoff et al. (1991), c = Brown et al. (1982), d = Chiweshe (2007), e = Davies (1999), f = Scholte (2010), g = Steyn (1982), h = Baker (2013), i = Gargett (1990), j = Mundy et al. (1986), and k = this study. We used the most current common and binomial names according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (IUCN 2017) for mammals and reptiles, and the IOC World Bird List, version 7.3 (Gill and Donsker 2017) for birds.
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#7
Is there any image about Harpy Eagle vs Andean Condor?

Both of them in South America.

Largest eagle vs largest vulture.
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#8
(03-10-2019, 02:08 PM)Uncia Wrote: Is there any image about Harpy Eagle vs Andean Condor?

Both of them in South America.

Largest eagle vs largest vulture.

both species are usually found in the jujuy yungas, but they are very rare, and have not observed clashes between both raptors.
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#9
(03-10-2019, 03:32 PM)Shenzi Wrote:
(03-10-2019, 02:08 PM)Uncia Wrote: Is there any image about Harpy Eagle vs Andean Condor?

Both of them in South America.

Largest eagle vs largest vulture.

both species are usually found in the jujuy yungas, but they are very rare, and have not observed clashes between both raptors.
Thanks.

But a fight that two species could be very interesting.

Condor has longer wingspan but harpy's body as big as condor..
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#10
I suggest requesting a match up then. We can discuss it there.
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#11
(03-10-2019, 08:12 PM)Old Tibetan Blue Bear Wrote: I suggest requesting a match up then. We can discuss it there.

Okay, then tomorrow taipan will create.

(because i said dunkleosteus vs a prehistoric hippo yesterday and today taipan will create it)
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#12
I will remind you tomorrow if that is ok with you. Glad to see some else here likes birds of prey. More pictures:

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White headed vulture harrassing tawny eagle.

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Wait your turn tawny eagle.

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Size comparison between a white headed vulture, white backed vulture, and bateleur's eagle

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White headed vultures and tawny eagle
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#13
Battle of the Wings – Predator versus Scavenger

by Melissa Smit | Nov 4, 2016 | BirdsFeatured ArticlesSpecial nature eventsVultureWild encounters | 3 comments

Working in the bush offers the opportunity to witness incredible wildlife interaction every day, but a few days ago, I saw something almost unbelievable.
It was a beautiful sunny morning as I made my way back to my living quarters after the morning game drive.  I saw this majesticmartial eagle flying around and landing on the ground a few meters away in the bush.  I thought I might try and photograph it – but what followed I could not imagine.
I moved into the bush as quietly as possible and positioned myself close enough for a few great shots of the eagle sitting on the ground.  I did notice that it was constantly looking up at the sky.

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Now the martial eagle is the largest eagle in Africa, with an average length of 78-96 cm, and a wingspan of 188-260 cm.  As one of the world’s most powerful avian predators, this eagle is fearsome with few natural enemies.
The diet of the martial eagle ranges from game birds and Egyptian geese, to reptiles such as monitor lizards and snakes.  Regular mammal prey includes hares, mongooses, squirrels, baboons, monkeys and sometimes young impala and smaller antelope. The martial eagle hunts mostly in flight, circling high above its territory, and stooping sharply to catch its prey by surprise. On occasion, they may still-hunt from a high perch or concealed in vegetation near watering holes. Birds are typically killed on the ground or in trees, and sometimes in mid-flight.
So, as this eagle was looking up, I noticed there were some hooded vultures flying quite low above us getting ready to take the thermals higher.  Out of nowhere this eagle shot up into the sky and slammed into one of the vultures flying above us, pulling it downwards before hitting the ground with a huge thud.

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These two big birds were fighting on the ground – it was just dust and feathers. The eagle made it look easy keeping the vulture pinned on the ground using its size and sharp talons.  The vulture flapped its great big wings but every attempt was useless against the eagle.  After a few brief moments of panic, the dust finally settled,and I saw the martial eagle spreading its wings victorious over its prey.

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For a moment, I could hardly believe what I had just witnessed. This was truly one of my best wildlife encounters ever. Thank goodness I had a camera, because no one would believe my story if I didn’t have proof!

https://www.kapama.com/rangerblog/battle...scavenger/
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#14



















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#15
(03-08-2019, 01:09 AM)Shenzi Wrote:
(03-04-2019, 07:44 AM)Shenzi Wrote: Table 1: Species recorded in the diet of Verreaux’s Eagles (Aquila verreauxii).

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I always knew the a black eagle can kill a white backed vulture and even a cape griffon (account posted by scottwolverine1111), I am surprise that even a white headed vulture is included in the list. White headed vultures are like three times the weight of a black eagle.
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