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Eagle vs vulture, pictorial and videos
#16
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#17
Here is the thing ive notice after getting to see these birds up close while working at lions safari.

Eagles kill vultures any vulture in the air by stooping at them, they do this because on the ground vultures will chase them off nests and cause all kind of trouble.


It is the same as falcons (birds with weak feet compared to hawks) will kill eagles hawks or anything

Same reason red tails kill great horned owls (who are far more powerful)

With bop whoever is the better flyer seems to rule the air. Falcons usually rule in the air. On the ground or by suprise they are the easiest to kill though follow by goshawks.

With the eagle vs vulture situation its not so much vultures will prey on eagles they just disrupt nests and steal from them on the ground but in the air a eagle stoops and hits any vulture even a lapped faced in the head the vulture will die. Just like a red tail hawk stooping hitting a bald eagle in the head will kill it. And just like a falcon will kill all of them with their stoop. The stronger the bird the faster they fall.

Harpy eagle can kill any bird in this world period. If you ever saw one up close you would understand.

I got to see a crowned eagle hunt in az yeah they are powerful but a bit over rated the male harpy was far stronger and he wasnt that much bigger than the female crowned.

But harpy eagle is a beast of a bird nothing condor or eagle will ever stand a chance. If a harpy flew at a man and hit him in the head hethe eagle woudlnt have much trouble killing him. They fly so fast for such a huge eagle. They can kill any giant ground bird either.
Looking for others to collaborate with others on youtube.
Few of my videos msg me If interested.
https://tinyurl.com/y65xxojj 
 https://tinyurl.com/y2gnz95x  


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#18
Here is some good information about interactions between Eagles & Vultures:

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Source: Vultures: Their Evolution, Ecology and Conservation
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#19
The eagles probably attacked the lappet faced vulture in the air where they have the advantage of maneuverability. I am surprise there is no records of a martial eagle attacking a lappet faced vulture.
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#20
(04-07-2019, 12:46 AM)OldGreenVulture Wrote: The eagles probably attacked the lappet faced vulture in the air where they have the advantage of maneuverability. I am surprise there is no records of a martial eagle attacking a lappet faced vulture.

The African Black Eagle based on the info above looks to an active attacker and killer of Cape Griffon and White headed Vultures. Maybe we will match it to the LFV soon!
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#21
(04-07-2019, 10:04 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(04-07-2019, 12:46 AM)OldGreenVulture Wrote: The eagles probably attacked the lappet faced vulture in the air where they have the advantage of maneuverability. I am surprise there is no records of a martial eagle attacking a lappet faced vulture.

The African Black Eagle based on the info above looks to an active attacker and killer of Cape Griffon and White headed Vultures. Maybe we will match it to the LFV soon!

Feel free to make the match up if you like. There are accounts of black eagles killing cape griffons posted by scottwolverine1111 on old carnivora proboards yet on 'Vultures of Africa', cape griffons defend their nest pretty well and one eagle has to distract the vulture while the other gets its egg or chick.
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#22
EGYPTIAN VULTURES (NEOPHRON PERCNOPTERUS)ATTACK GOLDEN EAGLES 
AQUILA CHRYSAETOS)TO DEFEND THEIR FLEDGLING

EGYPTIAN VULTURES (NEOPHRON PERCNOPTERUS)ATTACK GOLDEN EAGLES (AQUILA CHRYSAETOS)TO DEFEND THEIR FLEDGLING

KEY WORDS:Egyptian Vulture; Neophron percnopterus; Golden Eagle; Aquila chrysaetos.The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) is a medium-sized migratory scavenger which nests on rocky cliffs. It is territorial, and actively defends the area around the nest (Bergier and Cheylan 1980, Alauda 48:75–97). Egyptian Vultures frequently attack immature and adult conspecifics near the nest (Dona´zar and Ceballos 1990, Ecologı´a2:275–291), as well as other cliff-nesting birds including the Eurasian Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus), Eurasian Griffon (Gyps fulvus), Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax), and Common Raven (Corvus corax; F. Fernandez pers.comm.). These species also attack nesting Egyptian Vultures, mainly in order to defend their own territories, but sometimes to steal food that adult vultures bring to the nest (Elosegui 1989, Vautour fauve (Gyps fulvus), Gypae`te barbu(Gypaetus barbatus), Percnopte`re d’Egypte (Neophron percnopterus): syn the`se bibliographique et recherches. Acta Biologica Montana. Serie documents de travail 3. C.B.E.A., U.P.P.A., Pau, France)Egyptian Vultures have few predators; Common Ravens are the primary predators on eggs (Ferna´ndez 1994, Separatade Biblioteca 9. Ayto. de Aranda de Duero, Aranda de Duero, Burgos, Spain), and mammals such as the stone marten(Martes foina) and the fox (Vulpes vulpes) and raptors such as the Eurasian Eagle-Owl (Bubo bubo) and the Golden Eagle(Aquila chrysaetos) occasionally take chicks (Elosegui 1989). There are few documented encounters between Golden Eagles and Egyptian Vultures (Ferna´ndez 1994), though the two species have similar habitat requirements and some-times feed simultaneously on the same carcasses (P. Mateo unpubl. data). We here report a nesting pair of adult Egyptian Vultures attacking a pair of Golden Eagles in order to defend a fledgling vulture.The study area (1250 km2) is a mountainous region in northwestern Spain; elevations range from 90 to .2000 m.a.s.l.,providing many limestone cliffs suitable for raptor nest sites. In 2006, we estimated a breeding population of 14 pairs of Egyptian Vulture (P. Mateo and P. Olea unpubl. data); the nesting population of Golden Eagles was estimated to be approximately 13 breeding pairs (Sanz 2006, Fauna Vertebrada de la Montana Oriental Leonesa, Grupo de Accion Local Montan˜a de Rian˜o, Leo´ n, Spain).During a visit to an Egyptian Vulture territory on 14 August 2006 at 1800 H local time, we located two adults and one fledgling flying approximately 1 km from the nest. The three birds flew 50 m over the ground, alternating soaring and gliding. The adults were approximately 100 m away from the fledgling. An adult Golden Eagle, coming from the opposite side of the valley, flew close over the vulture fledgling (ca. 10 m). The adult vultures immediately flew back towards the fledgling. One minute later, the eagle flew back towards the vultures and both adult vultures dived at the eagle. The twoadults dived at the eagle .10 times in ca. 3 min. The Golden Eagle did not show any aggressive behavior while being attacked by the vultures. Three Eurasian Griffons came from the top of the valley, probably attracted by the presence of the other raptors. Simultaneously, another Golden Eagle joined the group from the same direction as the first. The Eurasian Griffons glided for a while and then flew away. The adult Egyptian Vultures chased the eagles, soaring up incircles. Finally, the eagles abandoned the group and the Egyptian Vultures continued flying together. The entire encounter lasted ca. 20 min. Aggressive encounters between Golden Eagles and Egyptian Vultures are infrequent; we have observed similar events only once in more than 600 hr (2 yr) of monitoring Egyptian Vultures. Other researchers who have been studying Egyptian Vultures for decades (e.g., Dona´ zar and Ceballos 1988, Ardeola 35:3–14; Dona´zar et al.2002, Biol. Conserv. 107:89–97) have observed attacks against Golden Eagles only once (J. Dona´zar pers. comm.).Theory predicts that if parental investment increases as the breeding season advances, the intensity of parental defense should also increase proportionately (Barash 1975, Wilson Bull. 87:367–373, Andersson et al. 1980, Anim. Behav. 28:536–542). Although other factors can influence defensive behavior (e.g., sex, longevity of adults, type of predator, and
duration of exposure to predator; Knight and Temple 1986, Auk 103:318–327), the reproductive value hypothesis may explain why the Egyptian Vultures aggressively defended their fledgling against a predator as powerful as the Golden Eagle. A similar phenomenon has been observed in other raptor species (Fisher et al. 2004, Can. J. Zool. 82:707–713).The Egyptian Vulture is classified as Endangered (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2007, http://www.iucn.org/themes/ssc/redlist.htm [last accessed 22 October 2007]), so information on the factors limiting its population may be of conservation value (Dona´zar 2003. Alimoche comu´n Neophron percnopterus. Pages 166–167 in R. Martı´ and J. Del Moral[EDS.], Atlas de las aves reproductoras de Espan˜a, Direccio´n General de Conservacio´n de la Naturaleza-Sociedad Espa-n˜ola de Ornitologı´a, Madrid, Spain). Interspecific competition and predation may result in nest abandonment or nest failure (Martı´nez and Blanco 2002, Ardeola 49:297–299), although some authors have found that interspecific aggression does not seem to limit vulture populations (Fernandez and Dona´zar 1991, Bird Study 38:42–44). In our study area, the low density of Golden Eagles does not seem to threaten either the nest sites or the fledglings of Egyptian Vultures, as eagle prey and nest sites are abundant in this region (P. Mateo and P. Olea unpubl. data; Junta de Castilla y Leo´n 2005, ReservaRegional de Caza de Rian˜o unpubl. rep.).We thank Jose´ A. Dona´zar and Fidel J. Fernandez for the information provided. We also thank Ana Bele´ n Buro´ n for reviewing the translation. We appreciate the improvements in English language usage made by Christina Riehl through the Association of Field Ornithologists’ program of editorial assistance.—Patricia Mateo (email address: pmatt@unileon.es), Department of Biodiversity and Environmental Management, Universidad de Leo´n, Campus de Vegazana,24071, Leo´ n, Spain; and Pedro P. Olea, Department of Exact and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Experimental Sciences, SEK University, Campus Santa Cruz la Real, 40003, Segovia, Spain.
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#23


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#24
[Image: media_httpitelegraphc_bxutd-scaled1000.jpg]
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#25
(04-02-2019, 01:27 AM)OldGreenVulture Wrote:
(03-08-2019, 01:09 AM)Shenzi Wrote:
(03-04-2019, 07:44 AM)Shenzi Wrote: Table 1: Species recorded in the diet of Verreaux’s Eagles (Aquila verreauxii).

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I always knew the a black eagle can kill a white backed vulture and even a cape griffon (account posted by scottwolverine1111), I am surprise that even a white headed vulture is included in the list. White headed vultures are like three times the weight of a black eagle.
its white headed pullus .

(04-07-2019, 10:04 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(04-07-2019, 12:46 AM)OldGreenVulture Wrote: The eagles probably attacked the lappet faced vulture in the air where they have the advantage of maneuverability. I am surprise there is no records of a martial eagle attacking a lappet faced vulture.

The African Black Eagle based on the info above looks to an active attacker and killer of Cape Griffon and White headed Vultures. Maybe we will match it to the LFV soon!

LPV the best fighter on land among all vulture, black or martial eagle may probably attacked from Air but on land LPV dominated.
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#26
[Image: 54800424_442422066494689_629731762502815...tagram.com]

I found this picture and it came with the following:
Martial Eagle vs. Lappet-Faced Vulture. The vulture wanted a piece of the eagle’s kill and a fight ensued

but did not say anything else, if someone finds what happened, please share it
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#27
I think the outcome of the fight will be like the video of the Eurasian black vulture driving away the golden eagle. Hopefully between three to ten years time actual videos on the outcome will be present. Before the video of ebv driving off golden eagles came about, birdwatchers actually saw it happen. Books like 'Raptirs of the World' and 'Vultures of Africa' talks about lappet faced vultures driving off martial eagles and Jane Goodall@gorilla chimp lady witness a case, of a martial eagle killing an almost fully grown jackal and was immediately attacked by a lappet faced vulture plus when I was doing door to door sales, I met a lady from South Africa who seem to confirm lappet faced vultures attack martial eagles to rob them. I am fairly sure new pictures will come up soon. No harm if I am proven wrong but until then I am sticking with my opinion.
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#28


[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#29
/\ The birds are a bit to far to identify.
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#30
(04-20-2019, 11:41 AM)Shenzi Wrote: [Image: 54800424_442422066494689_629731762502815...tagram.com]

I found this picture and it came with the following:
Martial Eagle vs. Lappet-Faced Vulture. The vulture wanted a piece of the eagle’s kill and a fight ensued

but did not say anything else, if someone finds what happened, please share it

New info: The lappet faced vulture is called 'kalakoon' in South Africa and it always usurps the martial eagle if its food.
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