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Bear forearm strength
#16
Exactly "a bear could grapple a buffalo better then a cat"
Pay attention to the word " grapple".
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#17
In case anyone is interested, I have heard that short faced bears weren't very good grapplers due to their relatively gracile forearms.
Mmm, chocolate cake
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#18
(11-10-2018, 09:07 PM)Felinepower Wrote:
(11-07-2018, 07:03 AM)brobear Wrote: A grizzly ( brown bear ) is stronger and a better grappler than any big cat of similar size.  Just the way it is.

So you are saying a bear could grapple a buffalo better then a cat....hmmmm i doubt it very much.

Ya cause they do it head on while cats ambush more often than not lol.
Hunt thy prey in packs, nature cares little for you individually.
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#19
[Image: 11jrjpx.jpg]

[Image: short-faced_bear-blog.jpg]
" The radius and ulna are separate, as are the tibia and fibula. This allows powerful twisting movements of the limbs"

[Image: ZDIXGGRRTBGNBKCKJSZF3LY4SI.jpg][Image: Me-with-Short-faced-Bear-humerus-left.jpg]
https://www.nps.gov/kova/blogs/ice-age-m...aska-5.htm

SFB like other bears at general,looks lika a good grappler to me( *)  ,however brown bear have only one adventage over SFB IMHO exceptionally short hind legs.


*Nearly all mammals, including chimps and gorillas, move on all fours when they run or cover long distances on the ground. On the other hand, all sorts of four-legged animals stand up and use their front legs to fight. They include anteaters, lions, wolves, bears, wolverines, horses, rabbits and many rodents and primates.

Carrier believes that the usefulness of quadruped forelegs as weapons is a side effect of how forelegs are used for walking and running. When an animal is running with its body positioned horizontally, the forelegs strike down at the ground. By lifting the body to a vertical posture, animals can direct that same force toward an opponent.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...171343.htm

http://oi63.tinypic.com/2zpuj6h.jpg
[Image: 2zpuj6h.jpg]
COMPARISON OF BLACK BEAR PAWS TO HUMAN HANDS AND FEET 
Identification Guides for Wildlife Law Enforcement No. 11 
Margaret “Cookie” Elizabeth Sims 
National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory 
1490 East Main Street 
Ashland, OR 97520 
Email: cookie_sims@fws.gov 
June 2007 
Partial wildlife remains found out of context cause much concern over the possibility that the 
unidentified remains may be of human origin. Wildlife forensic scientists are often asked to 
identify unearthed bones found near human activity areas, such as new home construction, 
excavation sites, etc. (See Figures 1 and 2.) There have even been cases involving skinned bear 
paws that had been deliberately placed in public areas to startle those who mistaken them as 
human hands. Gilbert (1993) suggests that paw bones discarded at taxidermy “dump” sites could 
also be confused with human remains. Because bear paws and human hands and feet are similar 
in overall size and shape (Figure 3), morphological examination of the skeletal elements are 
required to enable forensic scientists to identify partial remains in cases where the skin and/or 
claws are absent. 
The illustrations u



“[T]here is no doubt that by continuous selective breeding for shorter and shorter legs 

the [old English] Bulldog was produced” (quoted in Semencic 1984: 22).

In human 

Australopithecus was the first lineage that split from a common ape ancestor of the humans and chimps 4 million years ago. 

A new research points to the fact that these ape-like human ancestors kept short ape-like legs for 2 million years because a squat physique could have been a strong support in male combat over access to females. "The old argument was that they retained short legs to help them climb trees that still were an important part of their habitat. My argument is that they retained short legs because short legs helped them fight", says David Carrier, a professor of biology at University of Utah. 
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#20
(11-11-2018, 12:43 AM)Warsaw Wrote: Exactly "a bear could grapple a buffalo better then a cat"
Pay attention to the word " grapple".


Nope.... No it couldn't..... You dont see bears going out and grappling bison.... They are just not built to grapple other animals in the same way cats are.

Cats are just far better at grappling with other animals then bears.....its what they are designed to do.
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#21
Nope.... No it couldn't..... You dont see bears going out and grappling bison.... They are just not built to grapple other animals in the same way cats are.

Cats are just far better at grappling with other animals then bears.....its what they are designed to do.

Cats have retractable claws but human dont have any claws.

STILL human is far,far better grappler than any big cats.Rigth?


Based on anatomy
Bear is far better grappler than any big cats
In short
Because
bear paws and human hands and feet are similar in overall size and shape.


Off course here is much more datails like this

[Image: vrqcd0.jpg]
Or
Unusual high degree of forelimb dexterity.

The morphology of the forelimb in plantigrade species
allows for pronation and supination of the manus, which increases
dexterity of these animals (Iwaniuk et al., 2000). Palmigrade
carnivorans use their forelimbs to investigate objects, to grasp food
items and also for fighting, particularly in bears (Brown, 2009

large plantigrade feet and many other details.

"You dont see bears going out and grappling bison."


Well this is wrestling for you?

https://youtu.be/cMv9TtEjVRg
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#22
(11-11-2018, 12:43 AM)Warsaw Wrote: Exactly "a bear could grapple a buffalo better then a cat"
Pay attention to the word " grapple".

Grapple? 

These guys do it for a living: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjY_CSLUIiI
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