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Still snarling after 40,000 years, a giant Pleistocene wolf discovered in Yakutia
#1

By The Siberian Times reporter
07 June 2019
Sensational find of head of the beast with its brain intact, preserved since prehistoric times in permafrost.
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The Pleistocene wolf’s head is 40cm long, so half of the whole body length of a modern wolf which varies from 66 to 86cm. Picture: Albert Protopopov
The severed head of the world’s first full-sized Pleistocene wolf was unearthed in the Abyisky district in the north of Yakutia. 
Local man Pavel Efimov found it in summer 2018 on shore of the Tirekhtyakh River, tributary of Indigirka.
The wolf, whose rich mammoth-like fur and impressive fangs are still intact, was fully grown and aged from two to four years old when it died. 
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The wolf, whose rich mammoth-like fur and impressive fangs are still intact, was fully grown and aged from two to four years old when it died. Picture: Albert Protopopov
The head was dated older than 40,000 years by Japanese scientists.
Scientists at the Swedish Museum of Natural History will examine the Pleistocene predator’s DNA.
‘This is a unique discovery of the first ever remains of a fully grown Pleistocene wolf with its tissue preserved. We will be comparing it to modern-day wolves to understand how the species has evolved and to reconstruct its appearance,’ said an excited Albert Protopopov, from the Republic of Sakha Academy of Sciences. 
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Local man Pavel Efimov found it in summer 2018 on shore of the Tirekhtyakh River, tributary of Indigirka.
The Pleistocene wolf’s head is 40cm long, so half of the whole body length of a modern wolf which varies from 66 to 86cm. 
The astonishing discovery was announced in Tokyo, Japan, during the opening of a grandiose Woolly Mammoth exhibition organised by Yakutian and Japanese scientists. 
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CT scan of the wolf's head. Pictures: Albert Protopopov, Naoki Suzuki
Alongside the wolf the scientists presented an immaculately-well preserved cave lion cub. 
‘Their muscles, organs and brains are in good condition,’ said Naoki Suzuki, a professor of palaeontology and medicine with the Jikei University School of Medicine in Tokyo, who studied the remains with a CT scanner. 
‘We want to assess their physical capabilities and ecology by comparing them with the lions and wolves of today.’
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‘This is a unique discovery of the first ever remains of a fully grown Pleistocene wolf with its tissue preserved.' Pictures: Naoki Suzuki
The cave lion cub named Spartak - previously announced - is about 40cm long and weighed about 800 grams. 
Scientists believe the cub died shortly after birth. 
The recent discovery follows that of the remains of three cave lions in 2015 and 2017 by the same team.
The cave lion cub named Spartak - previously announced - is about 40cm long and weighed about 800 grams. Pictures: The Siberian Times, YSIA
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#2
If the head of this Pleistocene wolf was so big, maybe this wolf do not belong to the same species as the living grey wolf (Canis lupus). Maybe this giant Pleistocene wolf from Yakutia is related to the extinct dire wolf (Canis dirus) from the New World. 

Also, although a giant, this wolf was preyed upon by humans, who severed its head, or it died from other causes and the rest of its body was not preserved in permafrost?
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#3
Great find! Modern wolf heads are around 26cm long and dire wolf head was 31cm long from what I've read. So, if this wolf's head was 40cm long, then it was a very, very big wolf!
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#4
(06-10-2019, 09:17 AM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: If the head of this Pleistocene wolf was so big, maybe this wolf do not belong to the same species as the living grey wolf (Canis lupus). Maybe this giant Pleistocene wolf from Yakutia is related to the extinct dire wolf (Canis dirus) from the New World. 

Also, although a giant, this wolf was preyed upon by humans, who severed its head, or it died from other causes and the rest of its body was not preserved in permafrost?
It wouldn't surprise me if this animal's head was intentionally removed and buried, not for food but rather a ritual. Could have been part of the stock humans formed a partnership and eventually become our modern dogs. The golden fur of this animal makes me more inclined that this was the case.
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#5
Jesus Christ, its head size is even larger than those of a grizzly bear's which apperantly average 36.5cm.
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#6
Looking forward to the DNA analysis!
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#7
Absolutely amazing find ! Do you mind if it could be insert in the Ice Age Discoveries !? Because it Is one !

Thanks man
Just a normal guy who want to learn things !
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#8
Is the finding 40 cms or the skull inside it? Because the finding is mostly head but has about 10 cms of chunk on the back of it, which would make the skull large but normal for a grey wolf. They're kind of vague about what actually is measuring 40 cms.
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#9
All of skull can be 40 cm. That's normal.

Wolves have solid dolichocephalic type skull.. and their skulls grows grows and grows by length..
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#10
(07-12-2019, 12:16 AM)Uncia Wrote: All of skull can be 40 cm. That's normal.

Wolves have solid dolichocephalic type skull.. and their skulls grows grows and grows by length..

Well no, it's not normal. Adult male grey wolf skulls are around 28 cm long, with some really big ones maybe up around 30 cms. 40 cms is a big step up. Either this is a different species of wild canine or grey wolves used to be much much larger.
OR they're measuring the whole mass and not the skull.
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#11
(07-12-2019, 01:28 AM)Dale Earnfart Wrote:
(07-12-2019, 12:16 AM)Uncia Wrote: All of skull can be 40 cm. That's normal.

Wolves have solid dolichocephalic type skull.. and their skulls grows grows and grows by length..

Well no, it's not normal. Adult male grey wolf skulls are around 28 cm long, with some really big ones maybe up around 30 cms. 40 cms is a big step up. Either this is a different species of wild canine or grey wolves used to be much much larger.
OR they're measuring the whole mass and not the skull.
Some gigantic members can have 40 or nearly 40 cm skull.. Also that wolf probably different species than modern wolves..
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#12
Except it looks like it definitely isn't. As demonstrated by this guy (and just as I suspected) -
https://www.deviantart.com/paleosir/jour...-801166236

Just goes to show you shouldn't take articles at face value. Frankly carnivora should be the FIRST place to pick up BS like this.
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