Poll: Who wins?
You do not have permission to vote in this poll.
Bobcat
66.67%
4 66.67%
Fishing Cat
33.33%
2 33.33%
Total 6 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bobcat v Fishing Cat
#1
Bobcat - Lynx rufus
The Bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family Felidae, appearing during the Irvingtonian stage of around 1.8 million years ago (AEO). With twelve recognized subspecies, it ranges from southern Canada to northern Mexico, including most of the continental United States. The bobcat is an adaptable predator that inhabits wooded areas, as well as semi-desert, urban edge, forest edges, and swampland environments. The adult bobcat is 47.5 to 125 cm (18.7 to 49 in) long from the head to the base of the tail, averaging 82.7 cm (32.6 in); the stubby tail adds 9 to 20 cm (3.5 to 7.9 in) and, due to its "bobbed" appearance, it gives the species its name. An adult stands about 30 to 60 cm (12 to 24 in) at the shoulders. Adult males can range in weight from 6.4 to 18.3 kg (14 to 40 lb), with an average of 9.6 kg (21 lb); females at 4.1 to 15.3 kg (9.0 to 34 lb), with an average of 6.8 kg (15 lb). The largest bobcat accurately measured on record weighed 22.2 kg (49 lb), although there are unverified reports of them reaching 27 kg (60 lb). The bobcat is able to go for long periods without food, but will eat heavily when prey is abundant. During lean periods, it will often prey on larger animals that it can kill and return to feed on later. The bobcat hunts by stalking its prey and then ambushing it with a short chase or pounce.

[Image: Calero_Creek_Trail_Bobcat.jpg]

Fishing Cat - Prionailurus viverrinus
The Fishing Cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized wild cat of South and Southeast Asia. Like its closest relative, the leopard cat, the fishing cat lives along rivers, streams and mangrove swamps. It is well adapted to this habitat, being an eager and skilled swimmer. The fur of fishing cats is olive-grey with dark spots arranged in horizontal streaks running along the length of the body. The underside is white, and the back of the ears are black with central white spots. There are a pair of dark stripes around the throat, and a number of black rings on the tail. An adult fishing cat is about twice the size of a domestic cat, with a head and body length that typically ranges from 57 to 78 cm (22 to 31 in), and a 20 to 30 cm (7.9 to 12 in) long tail. A few much larger individuals have been reported, of up to 115 cm (45 in) in head-body length. Adult fishing cats weigh from 5 to 16 kilograms (11 to 35 lb). They have a stocky, muscular build with medium to short legs, and a short tail of one half to one third the length of the rest of the animal. The face is elongated with a distinctly flat nose and ears set far back on the head.

[Image: 640px-Fishing_cat_amidst_mangroves.jpg]



(07-11-2019, 11:41 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: fishing cat vs bobcat
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
Reply
#2
i am waiting to see any body defending bobcat over fishing cat.
Reply
#3
Correct me if I'm wrong, but fishing cats are fish specialists while bobcats are generalists who eat everything up to 90 lbs deer. I'd give it to the bobcat.
I'll hold my vote since i'm not too familiar with the fishing cat.
Reply
#4
(07-12-2019, 10:54 AM)Ophiophagushannah Wrote: Correct me if I'm wrong, but fishing cats are fish specialists while bobcats are generalists who eat everything up to 90 lbs deer. I'd give it to the bobcat.
I'll hold my vote since i'm not too familiar with the fishing cat.

No fishing cat are also generalists. Overall proportions of major prey groups of fishing cat were 42% fish, 27% mammal, 24% bird, 5% reptile, 2% crustacean, and 0.5% domestic chicken (table 1-1). Seasonality During the dry season (December-June), fish and birds remains represented a relatively higher proportion of the diet (47% and 29%, respectively) than during the wet season (39% and 20%, respectively). In contrast, mammals were only 11% of the diet in the dry season but increased to 39% in the wet season. Reptiles and crustaceans represented an insignificantly different (small) proportion of the diet during both the dry (11% and 3%) and wet seasons.

Quote:Quote: Wrote:
Fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus) are small wild cats with a discontinuous distribution in mangroves, wetlands, rivers, and swamps in parts of South and Southeast Asia (Nowell and Jackson 1996, IUCN 2010). The species was classified as globally endangered in 2008, based on steep population declines (especially in Southeast Asia) over the past several decades (IUCN 2008). Fishing cats are good swimmers with semi-webbed paws and a relatively short but muscular tail that can be used as a rudder in the water (Roberts 1977). Few studies have been conducted on the diet composition of wild fishing cats, and none has been published based on populations in Southeast Asia. One in-depth study (Haque and Vijayan 1993) was carried out in India and a number of other authors cite ad-hoc observations of diet habits (Jerdon 1874, Prater 1965, Roberts 1977, Sunquist and Sunquist 2002). These studies support a general pattern of fish as the primary food source supplemented by domestic chickens, birds, rodents, snakes, frogs, crabs, mollusks, and insects
 Fishing cats are known to pursue animals twice their body size (Branford 1988) and there are reports of fishing cats consuming chital (Axis axis) fawns (Sunquist and Sunquist 2002, Jerdon 1874), dogs, young domestic calves, and even unattended human infants (Sterndale 1884). Scavenging behavior has also been documented in fishing cats; Haque (1988) observed a fishing cat feeding on a cow’s carcass in Keoladeo National Park, India. Vegetable matter such as grass is also commonly found in scats (Haque and Vijayan 1993).  

Diet Composition Scats were found in greater density along dikes, and or edges of fish and shrimp ponds or along rice paddies where water pools with stranded fish were found. Overall proportions of major prey groups were 42% fish, 27% mammal, 24% bird, 5% reptile, 2% crustacean, and 0.5% domestic chicken (table 1-1). Seasonality During the dry season (December-June), fish and birds remains represented a relatively higher proportion of the diet (47% and 29%, respectively) than during the wet season (39% and 20%, respectively). In contrast, mammals were only 11% of the diet in the dry season but increased to 39% in the wet season. Reptiles and crustaceans represented an insignificantly different (small) proportion of the diet during both the dry (11% and 3%) and wet seasons (2% and 1%) (?? p-value= 0.001, d.f.2). Most feathers found in scats were from the Great Egret (Ardea alba) and Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis). The mammals were primarily rats (Bandicota bengalensis and Rattus argentiventer) which were very common in the study area. Evidence of reptiles was found in only a few cases and could only be identified as an unknown species of snake. Finally, fishing cats likely fed on several species of crabs but identity to species was not possible. Only one scat of 194 collected was found to contain domestic chicken remains. Hunting and Other Diet-related Behavior Observations. I frequently encountered multiple scats together in latrines (Figure 1-3). Latrines were almost always located on bare ground that was higher than the surrounding area such as on top of prominent dikes or inside abandoned huts. This observation indicates that scats may have been selectively placed and therefore not always associated with habitat. 

Identification of prey remains in scat:
I assumed the hair was ingested by fishing cats during grooming. Because no predators of fishing cats occurred on the study landscape, I concluded that any scats with fishing cat hair were produced by fishing cats. I further tested fishing cat hair identification by comparing hair collected from a captured fishing cat to hair found in 20 randomly selected scats. Hairs with the same pattern as those collected from a captured fishing cat were found among remains of prey species (e.g. small mammal hair and bones; bird feathers) in all 20 samples I tested. I used several criteria to conclude that a given scat was produced by a fishing cat. Candidate scats were those associated with fishing cat tracks, those found at the site and time period of camera trap locations documenting fishing cats, those clearly produced by trapped individuals, and those found at sites known, from radio telemetry, to be used by fishing cats. Tracks associated with scats were considered those of fishing cats if track shape and sizes were consistent with the ranges of a sample set collected from captive fishing cats (e.g. pad width size 2.3-3.5 cm.). The maximum width of all scats encountered was also recorded. To confirm that all scats were from fishing cats and not confused with domestic dog, scats > 2.5 cm were not used for this study. Given that the full faunal composition of the study area is poorly documented and compiling a reference collection (e.g. of species-specific hair, feathers, scales) would have been prohibitively time consuming, I categorized prey remains in scats (e.g. bone, feather, hair, and other materials) into six broad taxonomic categories: mammals, fish, birds, reptiles, crabs, other invertebrates. I also conducted DNA analysis for species identification. This was carried out at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok. To test my hypothesis that scats collected were from fishing cats, four semi-fresh scats collected in the field (all consistent with the physical characteristics of other scats collected) were genetically analyzed to determine the species of origin. The QIAGEN stool amplification kit (http://www.qiagen.com/us/products/catalo...uctdetails) was used for DNA extraction and QIAGEN Multiplex PCR kit (www.qiagen.com/products/pcr/multiplexpcrsystem/multiplexpcr.aspx) was used for DNA PCR amplification. A fragment analysis genotyping method was used to obtain allele sizes of 14 microsatellite markers. Each sample was genotyped three times to 
obtain accuracy of allele size and reduce error during amplification due to allelic dropout and false allele amplification. 


https://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/ha...sAllowed=y
Reply
#5
whats the largest prey they take, its prolly smaller than bobcat prey
Reply
#6
(07-12-2019, 12:18 PM)Ophiophagushannah Wrote: whats the largest prey they take, its prolly smaller than bobcat prey
Offcource bobcat is the big hunter. The largest hunt by fishing cat is chital. Well comparatively fishing cat are more stocky, muscular and larger skull then bobcat. However bobcat is the fearless, more agressive and far advantage hunter with strong front and hind limbs then fishing cat.
Reply
#7
^ @ O-F 786, can you cite any reputable studies to back-up your 'bold claims' about the B-cat being "stronger... more aggressive"?
Reply
#8
(07-12-2019, 02:44 PM)Mondas Wrote: ^ @ O-F 786, can you cite any reputable studies to back-up your 'bold claims' about the B-cat being "stronger... more aggressive"?

rabid are more likely found in bobcat due to more interaction with canids that why they are more agressive. I didnt say bobcat are stronger then fishing cat. 
Reply
#9
you said they had stronger forelimbs
Reply
#10
(07-12-2019, 10:00 PM)Ophiophagushannah Wrote: you said they had stronger forelimbs

Yeah they have because of complete retractable claw and long legs like cougar. However fishing cat has semi retractable claw and short legs like leopard and jagaur, But overall fishing cats are more stronger then bobcats.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)