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Lions vs Leopards; Compilation thread
#16
Leopard kills lion cub(s)

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#17
What does "Leopard turns Tiger" mean?
The lone wolf dies, while the pack survives...
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#18
(08-27-2018, 06:49 PM)Leopard Wrote:
(08-26-2018, 09:55 AM)Mondas Wrote: "Funny", but in post #3 of this thread.. it is stated..

"...she'd definitely tried to fight for her life, as her mouth & throat were full of hair from the lion's mane".

So, "literally" - an adult male lion will never be over-matched by any leopard - in a mortal combat contest..

It was a 6 month old cub...

Result would still be the same - for even the largest leopard, versus a dominant male lion - who was intent on killing..
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#19
(08-28-2018, 11:04 AM)Mondas Wrote:
(08-27-2018, 06:49 PM)Leopard Wrote:
(08-26-2018, 09:55 AM)Mondas Wrote: "Funny", but in post #3 of this thread.. it is stated..

"...she'd definitely tried to fight for her life, as her mouth & throat were full of hair from the lion's mane".

So, "literally" - an adult male lion will never be over-matched by any leopard - in a mortal combat contest..

It was a 6 month old cub...

Result would still be the same - for even the largest leopard, versus a dominant male lion - who was intent on killing..

provide evidence of such encounters then...
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#20
Ummm.. that's what the thread is about, surely?

Now, here's a challenge.. provide (even one) an example of a leopard - killing a dominant male lion..
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#21
(08-28-2018, 01:00 PM)Mondas Wrote: Ummm.. that's what the thread is about, surely?

Now, here's a challenge.. provide (even one) an example of a leopard - killing a dominant male lion..

no one has ever claimed that a Leopard was capable of such a feat.However,  I can post plenty
of examples of male Lions visibly deciding to not fully engage adult tom Leopards,
even when they have the full element of surprise.

The burden of proof is on you to find accounts of adult/territorial toms being
killed by single Lions...
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#22
No.. it isn't.. there is no such "burden of proof"..

Esp' since the domination of leopards ( inc' killing assaults) by male lions is a 'fait accompli' natural fact..
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#23
(08-28-2018, 01:00 PM)Mondas Wrote: Ummm.. that's what the thread is about, surely?

Now, here's a challenge.. provide (even one) an example of a leopard - killing a dominant male lion..

(08-28-2018, 01:11 PM)Shin Wrote:
(08-28-2018, 01:00 PM)Mondas Wrote: Ummm.. that's what the thread is about, surely?

Now, here's a challenge.. provide (even one) an example of a leopard - killing a dominant male lion..

no one has ever claimed that a Leopard was capable of such a feat.However,  I can post plenty
of examples of male Lions visibly deciding to not fully engage adult tom Leopards,
even when they have the full element of surprise.

The burden of proof is on you to find accounts of adult/territorial toms being
killed by single Lions...

Territorial male leopards are killed by Lionesses. 
Two lionesses kill the Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male.
Some more Leopards including Territorial Males killed by Lionesses.

It is really fortunate that Leopards cant read the BS their internet fans write/believe about them.



(08-28-2018, 03:29 AM)Leopard Wrote: Leopard kills lion cub(s)

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That picture/event seems to fit the research here:

The mean age of lions killed by leopards was 0.22 ± 0.12 years (range= 0.08–0.58 years), while the mean age of leopards killed by lions was 2.71±0.75 years (range=0.08–16.59years). "

Source: Leopard distribution and abundance is unaffected by interference competition with lions



Tree-climbing lionesses commandeer a leopard's kill

Watch: Tree-climbing lionesses commandeer a leopard's kill
BY EARTH TOUCH NEWS JUNE 14 2017




It's the signature post-hunt move of the leopard: once a meal has been caught, the best place to eat it is up in the trees, where bigger, turf-bound carnivores can't reach you. But as tourists and guides in South Africa's Londolozi Game Reserve recently witnessed, elevation doesn't always keep a leopard's catch safe from marauders. 

Ranger Amy Attenborough and her tourist group had been observing a well-known leopard female and her cub when word reached them of two local lionesses heading their way. The spotted cat had been resting at the base of a tree, her youngster roaming nearby and an impala meal stashed in the branches above. The approaching lions could only mean trouble. 
"There are times in the bush where one feels hugely conflicting emotions," writes Attenborough over at the Londolozi blog. "We love to see big cats interact with one another but when these situations occur, they are also vulnerable to injury, something none of us would ever wish on an animal."
Their relatively small size and solitary habits bump leopards down a few rungs on the predator hierarchy of the African bush. Pack animals like wild dogs and hyenas, whose strength comes from numbers, often chase the cats off their kills. And lions are an even bigger menace.
"Lions pose a very real threat to leopards," explains Attenborough. During her years as a Londolozi ranger, she's seen numerous cat-on-cat attacks, and several Londolozi leopards have died in violent clashes with their bigger kin. 
Luckily for this dozing mother, rustling footfalls gave the lions away, allowing the smaller cat just enough time to leap for the safety of the tree. But what happened next came as a surprise to Attenborough: intent on getting her paws on the spoils stashed in the tree, one of the lionesses started to climb. 
"Due to her weight and size and therefore much more limited climbing ability, the lioness wasn't able to climb as high as the leopard, [who] found safety up in the thinnest branches," she recalls.
The leopard may have evaded danger, but it also forfeited her hard-earned meal, which was quickly commandeered by the bigger cat. Some moments later, the second – and younger – lioness joined her accomplice in the branches, hoping to score a few scraps from the carcass. 
While lions are not known for their tree-climbing abilities, the behaviour isn't as rare as you'd think. Young lions will often scale trees when they play (being lighter helps), and prides in certain parts of Africa are famous for it. Most fully grown adults will at least attempt easily accessible branches.
As the lions gorged below, the leopard put her superior climbing skills to use: she tightroped her way overhead to an adjacent tree, and the safety beyond. Her cub, meanwhile, had already made its own getaway, disappearing out of sight towards a nearby river, where its mother also followed. 
"Despite this being an amazing scene to witness, we all breathed a huge sigh of relief when the female and her cub managed to escape the encounter unscathed," says Attenborough. 

https://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-w...ards-kill/
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#24
I see all this text, but nothing about a single Lion/Lioness killing an adult/territorial
tom Leopard...there is even an account of a small female Leopard, driving off a
male Lion trying to kill her cub...

Lion fans just don't want to admit the real respect Lions have for Leopards...especially
the combat experienced Toms...
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#25
if a lion really wants to kill a leopard, it will do so. but they do seem to be more hesitant to go in for the kill with them then they are with cheetahs and hyenas.
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#26
(08-29-2018, 02:21 AM)K9Boy Wrote: if a lion really wants to kill a leopard, it will do so. but they do seem to be more hesitant to go in for the kill with them then they are with cheetahs and hyenas.

On the contrary-if they could easily kill these adult toms
then they would...but how come single Lions never seem to "want" to
kill territorial toms? 

You've already pointed out the stark difference in how they regard the similar
sized Hyena/Cheetah.

Do you honestly believe that a male Lion will simply "scare" away a Hyena
or Cheetah, if they have the 100% element of surprise on there side?

Lets stop kidding ourselves here; Leopards are extremely formidable creatures-and
the Lions behavior towards them vs other predators is a testament to the the force
and sheer potential that these felines posses. Especially the prime-dominant Toms.
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#27
Quote:Lets stop kidding ourselves here; Leopards are extremely formidable creatures-and
the Lions behavior towards them vs other predators is a testament to the the force
and sheer potential that these felines posses. Especially the prime-dominant Toms.

Yes stop kidding yourself. Prime dominant Toms are killed by lionesses, mauled by lionesses, and run away in terror when facing physically superior pantherines like lionesses.
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#28
(08-29-2018, 05:08 AM)Shin Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 02:21 AM)K9Boy Wrote: if a lion really wants to kill a leopard, it will do so. but they do seem to be more hesitant to go in for the kill with them then they are with cheetahs and hyenas.

On the contrary-if they could easily kill these adult toms
then they would...but how come single Lions never seem to "want" to
kill territorial toms? 
well they can and do on the regular. I just reckon they are more hesitant as leopards are gnarly fighters and can cause more damage then a hyena or cheetah can, and since lions never eat leopards its usually more bother then its worth. its not a case of the lion being capable of doing it, because we all know they can
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#29
(08-29-2018, 09:24 AM)Taipan Wrote:
Quote:Lets stop kidding ourselves here; Leopards are extremely formidable creatures-and
the Lions behavior towards them vs other predators is a testament to the the force
and sheer potential that these felines posses. Especially the prime-dominant Toms.

Yes stop kidding yourself. Prime dominant Toms are killed by lionesses, mauled by lionesses, and run away in terror when facing physically superior pantherines like lionesses.

So...you're just gonna keep pretending I didn't specify "single Lion"?

(08-29-2018, 11:10 AM)K9Boy Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 05:08 AM)Shin Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 02:21 AM)K9Boy Wrote: if a lion really wants to kill a leopard, it will do so. but they do seem to be more hesitant to go in for the kill with them then they are with cheetahs and hyenas.

On the contrary-if they could easily kill these adult toms
then they would...but how come single Lions never seem to "want" to
kill territorial toms? 
well they can and do on the regular. I just reckon they are more hesitant as a leopard are gnarly fighters and can cause more damage then a hyena or cheetah can, and since lions never eat leopards its usually more bother then its worth. its not a case of the lion being capable of doing it, because we all know they can

Where are the accounts then? Single Lions regularly kill territorial Toms?

Post one account of such an instance...if they are so numerous, as you claim....
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#30
(08-28-2018, 04:23 AM)Grawlix Wrote: What does "Leopard turns Tiger" mean?

Around that time was when taipan was arguing with people about tigers running away, of course being incorrect at the same time.

(08-29-2018, 11:10 AM)Shin Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 09:24 AM)Taipan Wrote:
Quote:Lets stop kidding ourselves here; Leopards are extremely formidable creatures-and
the Lions behavior towards them vs other predators is a testament to the the force
and sheer potential that these felines posses. Especially the prime-dominant Toms.

Yes stop kidding yourself. Prime dominant Toms are killed by lionesses, mauled by lionesses, and run away in terror when facing physically superior pantherines like lionesses.

So...you're just gonna keep pretending I didn't specify "single Lion"?

(08-29-2018, 11:10 AM)K9Boy Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 05:08 AM)Shin Wrote:
(08-29-2018, 02:21 AM)K9Boy Wrote: if a lion really wants to kill a leopard, it will do so. but they do seem to be more hesitant to go in for the kill with them then they are with cheetahs and hyenas.

On the contrary-if they could easily kill these adult toms
then they would...but how come single Lions never seem to "want" to
kill territorial toms? 
well they can and do on the regular. I just reckon they are more hesitant as a leopard are gnarly fighters and can cause more damage then a hyena or cheetah can, and since lions never eat leopards its usually more bother then its worth. its not a case of the lion being capable of doing it, because we all know they can

Where are the accounts then? Single Lions regularly kill territorial Toms?

Post one account of such an instance...if they are so numerous, as you claim....

Sorry, but you are very delusional.

There are many cases where tigers have killed adult male leopards. Im sure a lion can do that too.
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