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Lions vs Leopards; Compilation thread
#46
I've yet to find a detailed description about this encounter but it seems to be a female engaging the lionesses. My bet is that there are cubs out there. Very rare nonetheless.

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#47
Funny how documentaries change the whole story. Here's an original encounter between lions and a leopard





Now compare it with this




They really want to show you what they want.
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#48
Female leopard confronts lioness to protect her cub

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Young leopard vs lioness

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#49
Well this comment might be unrelated to the thread but I don't think the lions are hesitant on attacking Tom leopards, I think they just don't find them to be much of a threat.

African lion killing African leopard

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#50
^^^^that's a small Leopard...hardly representative of a prime
territorial tom...
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#51
(10-01-2018, 04:07 PM)Shin Wrote: ^^^^that's a small Leopard...hardly representative of a prime
territorial tom...

When did I state that it was? I just wanted to contribute to the thread rather than just leave a comment.
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#52
(10-01-2018, 10:56 AM)Aztec Wrote: Well this comment might be unrelated to the thread but I don't think the lions are hesitant on attacking Tom leopards, I think they just don't find them to be much of a threat.

African lion killing African leopard

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The 2nd photo isn't from the same interaction. The leopard manages to escape from the lioness.

The other photos are from a pregnant female.
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#53
(10-01-2018, 04:21 PM)Aztec Wrote:
(10-01-2018, 04:07 PM)Shin Wrote: ^^^^that's a small Leopard...hardly representative of a prime
territorial tom...

When did I state that it was? I just wanted to contribute to the thread rather than just leave a comment.


Oh, well you made a comment about Lions not being hesitant to attack Leopards,
b/c there "not much of a threat"...yet they will outright kill similar sized cheetah
in similar instances. You never see Lions treating Cheetahs like Leopards. That
called "commanding respect".
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#54
(10-03-2018, 12:06 AM)Leopard Wrote:
(10-02-2018, 05:19 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote:
(10-01-2018, 10:56 AM)Aztec Wrote: Well this comment might be unrelated to the thread but I don't think the lions are hesitant on attacking Tom leopards, I think they just don't find them to be much of a threat.

African lion killing African leopard

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Photo 2 from here:

In July 11th at 5.30pm two of the breakaway lionesses had a fight with an old male leopard near the wooded area in marsh, the lioness was Jicho and we think she fought the leopard because he got a bit too close to her cubs who were nearby. The leopard and lion fought until the leopard scrambled up a tree with Jicho in pursuit. Jicho didnt get very far up the tree and the leopard then indignantly pee'ed on her from above.  Jicho got a scratch on the left side of her neck which was from the leopards front pad claw, this will heal in time. Despite the age of this Leopard who had worn out lower canines he gave Jicho a good run.

https://www.governorscamp.com/blog/masai...-july-2013

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Last two video's are from a different interaction. That's about a standoff between a huge dominant male leopard named Kali. Here's the account:
"The sighting of the month from Mara Plains was when Kali, the huge resident male leopard on the Olare River, was found having a bit of a fling with a leopardess, but the five lionesses and sub-adults of the Double-Crossing pride heard the chorus of growls. The lionesses stalked in and charged, the two leopards split and scattered, the leopardess headed upstream but the lions wanted Kali. They chased him into a small gully, where they surrounded him before jumping in on top of him. Huge snarls and roars followed before seconds later Kali literally popped out of the gully like a cork from a bottle. He took off down the river with the lionesses RIGHT behind him. The first refuge he came to was a slight overhang in the riverbank with a couple of roots across its access. He jumped into this spot and the lionesses tried to get at him but he let rip with the most fearsome combinations of teeth and claws from all four feet as he lay on his back, keeping his spine firmly against the riverbank. The lionesses backed off, keeping him pinned down, their faces bloody and covered in mud, unsure what to do next. Over the next half an hour the lions went at him twice more and we thought after the second attempt that he was finished. He had five lionesses ON TOP of him, all biting and clawing, but amazingly, despite the onslaught, Kali beat the lionesses off one at a time until they stood back, looking around through battered faces with what seemed like the realization that there is perhaps nothing more vicious than a cornered huge male leopard.

After this, the lionesses began to call for back up, roaring and marking the area around where Kali was crouched, snarling like a demon. They were calling the pride males. Kali obviously worked this out too and in the short time it took for the lionesses to be preoccupied calling for the males he crept out of the river overhang, but he did not run. He quietly, and without showing any limps or weakness, climbed the riverbank. At the top, rather than bolting for the nearest tree, he stopped, turned and looked back with blue rage in his eyes that we will never forget. Then, as the male lions finally came trotting through the bush, Kali took off. The lionesses heard him go and gave chase, but too late. He went up a Euclea tree like nothing had happened, leaving the lionesses furious at the bottom. What happened next was like a scene from one of those angry couples talk shows – the lionesses went at the male lions, unleashing their rage in a full attack, obviously full of pent-up anger at their quarry getting away. “Where the hell have you been you lazy (bleep bleep bleep bleep)!!!”. The male lions took the attack, stunned by the female’s aggression, before fighting back in full force, causing the unruly lionesses to split and run in all directions. This incredible sequence ended with the ‘lazy, slow and overfed’ Double Crossing males stalking around marking every bush and stick they saw in attempts to reassure themselves and the lionesses of their dominance and prowess."

I know that videos are from a different interaction.  Two posts stuck together. Anti flood.
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#55
Scar Nose Matshapiri male stalks and attempts to kill male leopard






Male lion stalks and pounces on male leopard (Camp Pan male)





Leopard stalked by 2 lionesses (@ 7:20)



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#56
(05-24-2018, 05:58 PM)Taipan Wrote: Some more Leopards including Territorial Males killed by Lionesses.

"Lions pose a very real threat to leopards. In fact, the Xidulu female leopard was recently killed by lions, and I’ve personally seen the Tsalala Pride chase leopards such as the Camp Pan and Marthly males in the past. This particular pride were responsible for killing the Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male, in all likelihood the Tutlwa female and possibly even a few unconfirmed individuals to add to that list too. The Nstevu Pride mauled the 4:4 male and he eventually died as a result of the injuries sustained during the fight. So despite this being an amazing scene to witness, we all breathed a huge sigh of relief when the Nanga female and her cub managed to escape the encounter unscathed."
http://blog.londolozi.com/2017/06/10/lionesses-chase-leopard-off-kill/

Here is the 4:4 Male killed by Lions:

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These are the girls responsible for killing Leopards including the Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male:

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The Tsalala Pride crosses the Sand River. Having territory in both the south and north of Londolozi, these lions are responsible for either injuring or killing a number of leopards in their time.

" About six months ago, the Tutlwa female was seen fighting off the Tsalala Pride in a thick section of the Sand River. Although no one actually saw the lions grab her, she was seen leaping away from them into some debris and judging by the sounds coming from the thicket, a fight definitely occurred. Since this time her territory remains eerily quite. The Tsalala pride was also responsible for the death of the Nyelethi Female and Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male, the latter of which we reported on in this blog last year.

http://blog.londolozi.com/2017/02/25/why-the-north-is-so-dangerous-for-leopards/


Farewell to the Piva Male

James TyrrellAugust 14, 2017 351

In the early hours of Saturday morning, in an incident unseen by human eyes – like so many others in the bush – the Piva male leopard, one of Londolozi’s most well-known, was pulled from the boughs of a Saffron tree by lions and killed.

No-one saw it happen, but the signs were clear for all. Deep gouges in the bark from lethal claws tearing through it. Tufts of mane hair caught on a branch where what are suspected to be the Avoca males attempted to lunge up to grab the leopard. A drag mark across the sandy track led to where his carcass – partially consumed by hyenas – lay. It was still warm upon its discovery, suggesting that his death had occurred only a short while before.

The Piva male’s passing has brought about a different reaction in the guest and guiding community of Londolozi and surrounds than I’ve seen before upon the death of an individual leopard. It’s not so much grief or a sense of loss that has been the overwhelming response, but more a feeling of disbelief. This was no old leopard being pushed out of his territory, no young pretender, no injured individual struggling from day to day. No, this was a gorgeous animal in his absolute prime, who was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time.

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The Piva male was a direct descendant of the original mother leopard that was first viewed in 1979. Photograph by James Tyrrell

I have seen lions chase leopard on many occasions, but never with any success; invariably the lion gives up if the leopard continues to run, or if the leopard seeks refuge in a tree (almost certainly the case here), the lion(s) lose interest, as their climbing abilities don’t even compare to those of their spotted cousins. The Piva male, it seems, simply chose the wrong tree. Quick or even instant decisions are often the fine margin between life and death in the animal kingdom, and although a tree might have been the best option at the time (maybe the lions came at him from different directions and evasion on the ground wasn’t an option), a Saffron is not the ideal species to climb to try and get out of reach of marauding lions – it is a rather low and scraggly tree, lacking the height and vertical trunk needed to provide a safe refuge for a leopard. It would have been a relatively simple matter for the two Avoca males to scramble or even reach up and pluck the Piva male out.

https://blog.londolozi.com/2017/08/14/fa...piva-male/
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#57
Lioness Almost Kills TWO Male Leopards

James Tyrrell August 25, 2018 312

With the Anderson male now going through the final stages of the recovery process of his left eye, one would hope he would stay out of trouble for awhile. Instead, he was involved in a spat with his main rival – the Flat Rock male – and in the process, narrowly avoided meeting his death under the claws of the Tsalala Lioness. In fact both male leopards nearly got taken out by her.

Ranger Sean Zeederberg was there that day and takes us through the sighting:

Quote:Ranger Bruce Arnott had seen a leopard dragging a kill into the river the evening before but was unable to follow through the rocks, and lost sight of it. The next morning ranger Greg Pingo went back into the area, and after some very technical driving managed to get to the spot where the kill was, and there he found both the Flat Rock and Anderson male leopards, not too far from away from each other and growling constantly. Hearing about this sighting, I decided to take my guests there that afternoon, and driving into the river, we spotted some vultures sitting in a tree, which pointed out where the kill was from a long way off. As we arrived, we were surprised to find not the leopards but the lone Tsalala lioness feeding on the carcass, which she had clearly robbed from the two males. We watched her feed for awhile and then heard some growling coming from not too far upstream. We presumed it was the leopards, so we sat and waited to see what would happen.
Sure enough, after about 15 minutes the Flat Rock male appeared and began moving closer to where the lioness was. I didn’t want to move the vehicle, as any sound might have impacted the leopard’s ability to maybe hear the lioness feeding. Our hearts were pounding as he approached, and he must have been within a metre of her before she came at him. Leopards have lightning reflexes, and it was only this that saved him as he immediately twisted to the side, ducking her paws and running for his life. He escaped unscathed and the lioness simply stood there, breathing heavily.
Not wanting to be too close in case the Anderson male also returned to the site of the carcass, I reversed the car, and none too soon, for just as the lioness lay down to rest, the Anderson male came through the reeds.

The video below shows what happened:





Leopards have incredible agility, and their instant reflexes, acceleration and ability to twist themselves out of harm’s way saved both the Anderson and Flat Rock males from being the next in a series of leopards that have been killed by lions on or around Londolozi in the last couple of years.

I know many people see how big the Anderson male is and assume that he can take on a lioness, but he can’t, so let’s lay that to rest. One-on-one he would be no match for an adult lion as he would simply be overwhelmed and out-muscled. But his size most likely counted in his favour here, as he would be a slightly more difficult prospect to tackle than, say, the Nkoveni female, who is probably less than half his size. The moment’s hesitation on the part of the Tsalala female that the Anderson male’s bulk may have bought him could have been the difference between life and death. One can see in the slow-motion section of the video how the lioness instinctively ducks as she anticipates a swipe from the leopard. He rears up and spreads his paws wide, ostensibly to slash at her, but mainly to make himself look as big as possible. Luckily his tactic worked, as one can clearly see how the lioness shies away at the crucial moment.

Sean picks up the story again:

Quote:The leopards had both moved off and we could hear them growling at each other once more, their respective brushes with death apparently not having fazed them. Since the lioness was lying in the reedbed and we couldn’t really see her, we decided it would be a better option to follow the two leopards, who would growl at each other, presenting laterally to show each other how big they both were, then lie down again before repeating the whole procedure. They were out on the rocks for some of the sighting, and to have two big males side by side like that was spectacular!


Leopards in general are conflict averse. Being solitary animals they are hesitant to engage in physical confrontations unless absolutely necessary, as an injury that impacts their hunting abilities may prove fatal. Given the close call that both males had had only minutes before, I imagine a show of bravado was all they were prepared to commit to that afternoon. The Sand River has long acted as the grey area between the territories of these two rivals, and the whole interaction was yet another incident between them (most of which we never see), in which they were simply reestablishing where that line separating their respective territories lies…

https://blog.londolozi.com/2018/08/25/li...-leopards/
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#58
That's not the point of this thread is it? Nobody in this thread ever mentioned that a leopard can kill a lion. What it does show however, is that it's more than capable of fending off an incoming lion attack or survive such encounters to live another day.

As stated in the quote, Anderson was big enough to not be tackled down and made the lioness hesitate.
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#59
(10-06-2018, 04:19 PM)Leopard Wrote: As stated in the quote, Anderson was big enough to not be tackled down and made the lioness hesitate.

Actually it states :

"I know many people see how big the Anderson male is and assume that he can take on a lioness, but he can’t, so let’s lay that to rest. One-on-one he would be no match for an adult lion as he would simply be overwhelmed and out-muscled."
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#60
(10-06-2018, 04:30 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(10-06-2018, 04:19 PM)Leopard Wrote: As stated in the quote, Anderson was big enough to not be tackled down and made the lioness hesitate.

Actually it states :

"I know many people see how big the Anderson male is and assume that he can take on a lioness, but he can’t, so let’s lay that to rest. One-on-one he would be no match for an adult lion as he would simply be overwhelmed and out-muscled."

I never said he can take on a lioness, so that quote isn't relevant. This one is however:

"But his size most likely counted in his favour here, as he would be a slightly more difficult prospect to tackle than, say, the Nkoveni female, who is probably less than half his size. The moment’s hesitation on the part of the Tsalala female that the Anderson male’s bulk may have bought him could have been the difference between life and death. One can see in the slow-motion section of the video how the lioness instinctively ducks as she anticipates a swipe from the leopard. He rears up and spreads his paws wide, ostensibly to slash at her, but mainly to make himself look as big as possible."
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