Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Animal vs. Animal Pictorial; These are accounts of natural confrontations.
#46


[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
[-] The following 1 user Likes Taipan's post:
  • HoundMaster
Reply
#47
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwyDulBE4ZI
Looking for others to collaborate with others on youtube.
Few of my videos msg me If interested.
https://tinyurl.com/y65xxojj 
 https://tinyurl.com/y2gnz95x  


Reply
#48
Another standoff between a jaguar and giant anteater: https://www.instagram.com/p/BoH-WiljfCm/...hare_sheet

(Don’t know how to use the embedded Instagram links on this new site yet, sowwy.)
[Image: M41OzGR.jpg]
[-] The following 1 user Likes Hydrus's post:
  • Aztec
Reply
#49













Donkey mom Revenge from the wolf who did kill her baby



Reply
#50
2 Pitbulls catch a coyote in the garden (accidental incident, not hunting) skip to 1:03





Leopard kills pet dog. This one was really sad. I really can't understand why you would leave your solitary dog outside in leopard country.



 [Image: 75TiAZC.jpg]
Reply
#51
(09-28-2018, 09:06 PM)K9Boy Wrote: 2 Pitbulls catch a coyote in the garden (accidental incident, not hunting) skip to 1:03





Leopard kills pet dog. This one was really sad. I really can't understand why you would leave your solitary dog outside in leopard country.




You say that humans are bad. Although dogs are street animals. There are countries where dogs as food (Korea,China,Indonesia.....).
Reply
#52
I never said anyone was bad, sh1t happens. it was just sad to see a dumb and oblivious pet get killed in its own home like that
 [Image: 75TiAZC.jpg]
Reply
#53
Video 
Puma invades a garden and grabs a dog in russia. must have been an escaped pet.



 [Image: 75TiAZC.jpg]
Reply
#54
(10-03-2018, 03:59 AM)K9Boy Wrote: Puma invades a garden and grabs a dog in russia. must have been an escaped pet.




There is no wild puma in Russia. May be puma run away from the zoo? or domestic puma.
Reply
#55
It certainly did a horrible job at killing that dog. I can almost imagine a larger breed could have fended it off.
Reply
#56
(10-03-2018, 04:31 AM)Ryo Wrote: It certainly did a horrible job at killing that dog.


no surprise there this appears to be an exotic pet.
 [Image: 75TiAZC.jpg]
Reply
#57
This is domestic young male puma age about 1 years old. (kitty)
https://radiovesti.ru/brand/61178/episode/1934608/



Reply
#58
Warthogs fighting like boars. Javelinas fighting like canids. 








[-] The following 1 user Likes Forbiddenip's post:
  • Ryo
Reply
#59





Reply
#60




On 29th March 2009, at around 08.00, an adult smooth-coated otter, of unknown sex, was observed in a pond at the Forestry Research Institute, Malaysia (FRIM) (3°13'49''N - 101°38'00''E) (Figure 1). The pond is approximately 200 m in diameter and surrounded by a mixture of by trees and lawns, the latter leading to a road around 50 m from the pond. Although otters have been observed there by the authors before, sightings are considered to be a rare event.

The otter was initially observed catching and eating small fish at several locations within the pond over a half-hour period. At approximately 08:30 a large water monitor lizard, approximately 110-120 cm in length, swam across the pond and climbed onto a small tree protruding from the water (Figure 2). Within seconds the otter appeared at the base of the tree and grabbed the monitors' tail in its mouth (Figure 3). Although the monitor resisted the efforts of the otter, turning its head repeatedly as if trying to bite it (Figure 4), it was eventually pulled into the water where the otter immediately climbed onto its back (Figure 5).

The ensuing struggle lasted several minutes during which the monitor seemed to put most of its effort into escape. The otter, however, seemed intent on overpowering it and dragged it underwater several times (Figure 6). At one point the otter was seen biting the back of the monitors' neck and, though it was not clear if this was a fatal bite, the monitor did cease to struggle and soon after was seen floating on its back. At this point it was assumed to be dead, though this was never actually verified. The otter then gripped the “carcass” in its jaws and swam with it back to the area where the encounter had begun. Here it appeared to push the body under a partly submerged tree-limb, as if caching it; a behaviour that is not, to this authors knowledge, recorded elsewhere.

[Image: Goldthorpe_et_al_2010_Fig2.jpg]
[Image: Goldthorpe_et_al_2010_Fig3.jpg]
[Image: Goldthorpe_et_al_2010_Fig4.jpg]
[Image: Goldthorpe_et_al_2010_Fig5.jpg]
[Image: Goldthorpe_et_al_2010_Fig6.jpg]
http://www.otterspecialistgroup.org/Bull..._2010.html



Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 3 Guest(s)