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(08-23-2018, 02:56 AM)Maxilla Wrote: [ -> ][Image: giant_predatory_dinosaurs_comparison__by...a6zspc.png]

Link

(08-23-2018, 03:56 AM)Maxilla Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-23-2018, 03:13 AM)Grawlix Wrote: [ -> ]Sooooo is Tyrannosaurus Rex the largest Theropod currently?

When comparing the largest reliable specimens. Even the more average specimens tend to outweigh the animals above. There are estimates that Giga could get up to 8200kg, but those are based upon a dentary fragment, and those dont scale isometrically with the rest of the animal. If we took that into consideration, we might as well also consider UCMP as valid as well.

[Image: tyrannosaurus_rex_ontogeny__by_franoys-da3k5zl.png]

This is due in part to the fact that Tyrannosaurus rex has almost comically wide proportions compared to other theropods. That is best displayed here:

[Image: north+vs+south+redux.jpg?format=1500w]

Here's a comapison of the animals on top of one another:
[Image: JNRaWEn.jpg]

It should be noted that this information IS subject to change as more discoveries are made.


EDIT:

Here's a comparison between Tyrannosaurus and Spinosaurus:

[Image: GfZB0h1.png]

The actual model for the Spinosaurus shouldn't be considered accurate, as its legs are too small, but the size of the legs should be independant of the girth of the body. Please correct me if I'm wrong about that.
(09-04-2018, 04:02 AM)Maxilla Wrote: [ -> ]Back on topic...

[Image: xYYR6cP.jpg]

Whipped up a comparison between the two. It should be noted that Dilophosaurus was an exceptionally gracile animal, and I doubt the weight difference between the two varies much between extremely small and negligible. That being said, Dakotaraptor offers a particular challenge when placed in comparison with other animals- whoever posed it for various skeletals needs to be taken around back and shot. I mean honestly, what the hell is this?.

Because of this odd running pose, it looks Dakotaraptor has an extreme height advantage in the comparison. This is not the case. In life the animal probably was only slightly taller due to its more cursorial legs.

It should also be noted that this is the Dakotaraptor model that is currently accepted. In reality, if you look at link I just made fun of, we really don't have much of the animal. Just an arm, some leg, and vertebrae. We honestly have no idea what its skull looks like.

Klem Kelm Formation comparison:

[Image: kem_kem_giants_mk_iii_by_randomdinos-dako01q.png]
Link

Brazil Theropods comparison:

[Image: theropods_of_brazil_mk_ii_by_randomdinos-dbcsyvi.png]
Link

Cloverly Formation comparison

[Image: cloverly_formation_taxa_mk_iii_by_random...afwknb.png]
Link
(10-18-2018, 02:37 AM)Maxilla Wrote: [ -> ]Here's a bird's eye comparison between Sue and a fifteen meter Spinosaurus/Sigilmassasaurus, since AmurTiger's Rex has some very odd proportions and the images arent to scale with one another.

[Image: OOglV1y.jpg]
(03-22-2019, 03:03 AM)Verdugo Wrote: [ -> ]Saurophaganax vs Torvosaurus gurneyi
[Image: IVBv6Qv.png]


Saurophaganax vs Torvosaurus tanneri
[Image: BkjV4lR.png]
Spinosaurus (Outdated) vs Trex
[Image: jsmGxcE.png]
Well, it's for the nostalgia...
Hmm just came across someone who had this to say about Franoys work

This guy butchers theropod feet so the animals look taller, frankensteins up skeletals by copypasting already existing images, and pretty much clickbaits his way into relevance by doing things like this.


Fraud of an artist.

Does anyone here know what he means by butchering the feet? Does anyone else here have the same issues with Franoys work as this guy?
(04-05-2019, 09:35 PM)Jurassicdangerousdinosaur Wrote: [ -> ]Does anyone here know what he means by butchering the feet? 
'Butchering' means 'faking' and 'making up' and 'sewing unrelated things together'. I think he meant @Franoys made up/copy&paste his reconstructions from other sources.

Probably just a troll tbh...
Yeah sounds like a troll or just really seems to dislike Franoys work for no good reason.
Here is another look at the Tyrannosaurus specimens Scotty and Sue https://www.deviantart.com/thedinorocker...-792696226

Also, really noobish question but I have tried for a while now can anyone tell me how to post the image on here ? Instead of me just posting a link to another website that would be a huge help.
Thalassophoneus: Wrote:Two different skeletals of Alamosaurus. Is there any indication about which one is more accurate?

[Image: remember_the__adult__alamosaurus_by_scot...64g64u.jpg]
[Image: ragnarok_by_getawaytrike-da8keui.jpg]


Thalassophoneus: Wrote:
Wombatman: Wrote:Iguanodon has evolved quite a lot of times since its discovery (reffering to our reconstructions of the animal). From giant iguana to lizardesque monster, to kangaroo-dino, then shrink-wrapping era, then a bulky ground sloth-like weird ornithopod, with massive arms.
Does Iguanacolossus for example share this weird arm anatomy?
Other iguanodontians such as Hippodraco or Iguanacolossus have more normal proportions.

[Image: iguanodonts-from-utah.jpg]

We pretty much know how Iguanodon looked like. The problem is that most depictions I have seen seem to have more normal proportions for an ornithopod, kinda like this.

[Image: Igbernisskel.jpg]

Iguanodon is known to have had large arms, but Hartman's skeletal looks kinda weird, judging also from skeletons of the animal I have seen.

[Image: WATER_12052_2009_137_Fig1_HTML.jpg]

[Image: Iguanodon_de_Bernissart_IRSNB_01.JPG]

I'm not sure if there's anything else affecting the look of Hartman's depiction. I will search about it a little more.

I checked the following two skeletals of Iguanodon in terms of proportions. What I noticed is that they were different, like on that Scott's version has a shorter humerus. Also it appeared to me that the first one was closer to the proportions mentioned in fossilworks.

Of course there are other things that might play a role, like that Hartman has made the neck less curved, thus leaving the chest cavity more free from the front.

[Image: Igbernisskel.jpg]
[Image: iguanodon_by_scotthartman-d9md3tk.jpg]

http://fossilworks.org/?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=58905

Of course a very simple explanation for this is that due to Iguanodon having been a trash been for enigmatic hadrosaur taxa for a long time, there's some little confusion.
Here is one I made myself:

[Image: 6wLHs45.png]

(Stan the t-rex on the left and gigantosaurus on the right)

I have actually made a couple more but I don't think they are that accurate upon further look.