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Kurtz Wrote:I start the topic with a couple of average big territorial male 


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the Airstrip male @ mala mala or Dudley @ londolozi Sabi Sands:

http://blog.londolozi.com/2018/08/13/mal...t-blinded/

Anderson Male Still Has His Eye!

James Tyrrell August 13, 2018

My Londolozi colleagues will laugh at me for this one, as I don’t usually like admitting that I’m wrong, but in this case I am more than happy to, as it has now become clear that one of the reserve’s most impressive leopards still has his eye!

I am of course talking about the Anderson male, who we (I, cringe) reported as having lost his left eye in an unknown incident.
Take a look at the picture below, which was taken on the morning of when he was first discovered with the injury:

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As you can see, things in that left eye socket don’t look too good… Swelling and lacerations, as well as what appeared to simply be an empty hole where his eye should have been, led us to jump to the conclusion that his eye was gone, which I duly – and mistakenly as it now turns out – announced.
Now take a look at Don Heyneke’s photo from a day or two later:

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Again, the prognosis was not so good. We certainly don’t profess to be wildlife veterinarians, but one can still see how whatever happened to the leopard has caused some serious swelling around the socket, and of a viable eye there doesn’t appear to be any sign in the photo.
This kind of drama defines life for a wild animal out in the bush, and although whatever actually took place (unconfirmed reports of him being hit by a rhino were received, and there were also compelling arguments that he received the injury in an altercation with the Flat Rock male) seemed to have resulted in a major setback for this enormous leopard, we didn’t believe it to be life-threatening, as leopards are remarkably efficient at adapting.

Then in a different sighting of him a few days after the above picture was taken, ranger Guy Brunskill was viewing the Anderson male after dark up in a tree, and the spotlight playing on the leopard’s face certainly seemed to have two eye-shines reflecting back. The eyes of nocturnal predators – among other mammals – reflect light back from the torch beam due to a reflective layer called the tapetum lucidum, and from the double eye-shine, Guy was convinced that the leopard still had an eyeball, concealed somewhere back in the recesses of the injured socket.
I’ll be the first to admit that I was skeptical about Guy’s claim, having seen the injury myself and presuming that the eyeball must have ripped out. I imagined that the reflection would be due to some sort of fluid seeping into the wound.
How wrong I was.

A chance meeting along Londolozi’s northern boundary with Colleen Bekker, a guest at one of the Sabi Sands’ northern lodges, soon cleared things up.
The Anderson male had crossed north out of Londolozi the day before, and Colleen had seen him and captured the following pictures, which she was kind enough to send me:

[Image: 7X1A1616-1398x857.jpg]Although still clearly showing signs of damage around the socket, the intact eye of the Anderson male can just start to be made out as the area surrounding it heals… Photograph by Colleen Bekker

[Image: Anderson-Eye-Colleen-Bekker-1398x932.jpg]The leopard lies down for some rest. It’s tricky to see without zooming in fully, but this photo clearly shows an intact pupil in the injured eye. Photograph by Colleen Bekker

When we met on the boundary Colleen showed me a magnified photo on her camera in which one could see the faint hint of an eyeball, and what almost certainly looked like the leopard’s pupil. The second photo above was the one Colleen was particularly excited about, as it shows the Anderson male in the spotlight, and Colleen informed me that his pupil had constricted in the spotlight, which it wouldn’t be if the leopard had lost fully function in his eye.

Then the final irrefutable proof came when James Souchon snapped the cover photo of this post in a sighting of the Anderson male with a warthog kill, a zoomed in version of which can be seen below:

[Image: Anderson-Eye-5-720x480.jpg]
The Anderson male with a warthog firmly clamped between his jaws, his left eye there for all to see. Photograph by James Souchon

James was of course thrilled to present these photos to the rest of the Ranger and Tracker team, and we can now officially confirm that the Anderson male still has his left eye. Whether the eye is fully functional or not we can’t say for sure, but the outlook for the leopard is certainly far more favourable than it was a couple of weeks ago.

We hope this good news gets everyone’s week off to a good start!

http://blog.londolozi.com/2018/08/13/mal...ium=Social
Camp Pan

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Mbavala

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Indian leopard

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Giants from Sri Lanka, proving that these are the biggest subspecies

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Awesome thread! I love the Mbavala.
Balaji is not territorial leopard. He was big wild territorial leopard.

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Regular visitors to Sri Venkateswara Zoological Park, especially school children, need no introduction to ‘Balaji’, one of the favourite inmates in the enclosure for the wild. The news of Balaji’s ill-health due to old age has caused concern in those who regularly throng the zoo.
It was in February 1998 that the leopard sneaked into the zoo premises from the abutting Tirumala forest, when it was caught in a cage and named as ‘Balaji’. While the life span of a leopard is 12-15 years and the average weight 55-65 kg, Balaji weighed a whopping 113 kg then, when it was around 12 years of age. Now, at the age of 27 years, the big cat weighs 143 kg, which is almost unheard of, especially for animals bred in captivity for such a long period of 15 years.
Concluding that it could belong to a strong and rare lineage, the forest authorities got its progeny sent to the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), Hyderabad, where its gene was reportedly extracted for further research. The leopard, surpassing its normal age and still leading a healthy life, has been a pleasant surprise for many among the public as well as social forums associated with zoo activities, till the news of its illness surfaced.
“Balaji has not taken food for the last two days. With old age adding to his own weight, he is feeling difficulty in breathing,” explains S. Saravanan, the curator of the zoo. The zoo’s in-house veterinary team is taking care of the bulky Balaji by administering fluid diet, but as the ageing animal is hardly showing any signs of recovery, there is a semblance of disquiet among the officials too.

https://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp...802541.ece


Balaji', the bulky leopard in Sri Venkateswara Zoological Park, died at 4.30 a.m. on Tuesday
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Indian leopard

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What an animal
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Here is a large Kruger Leopard.

Size comparison of big male and female

This Zimbabwe Leopard looks pretty big.

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http://www.classicsafariafrica.com/blog/...-zimbabwe/
Indian male who could be mistaken for a jaguar. Absolutely dwarfs the female.

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Speaking of big Leopards, it seems the ones from Zimbabwe seem to be quite large on average. Anyone know about this?

Here are some stats:

Quote:However, in Kruger National Park eight males leopards weighed an average of 60.6 kg and for 11 females the average was 37.4 kg.

In Zambia nine males weighed an average of 49 kg and nine females averaged 34 kg.

In Zimbabwe, 13 males weighed an average of 59.6 kg and seven females averaged 31.5 kg.

In Sri Lanka, the average weight of eleven males was 56.3 kg and seven females, 29 kg.

In Thailand three males averaged 56.7 kg while two females averaged 23 kg.

https://pictures-of-cats.org/average-wei...opard.html

I also heard somewhere else that they are reputed for being a bit on the big side. Quite an interesting set of info.
(08-22-2018, 04:08 PM)ApexBoy Wrote: [ -> ]Speaking of big Leopards, it seems the ones from Zimbabwe seem to be quite large on average. Anyone know about this?

Here are some stats:

Quote:However, in Kruger National Park eight males leopards weighed an average of 60.6 kg and for 11 females the average was 37.4 kg.

In Zambia nine males weighed an average of 49 kg and nine females averaged 34 kg.

In Zimbabwe, 13 males weighed an average of 59.6 kg and seven females averaged 31.5 kg.

In Sri Lanka, the average weight of eleven males was 56.3 kg and seven females, 29 kg.

In Thailand three males averaged 56.7 kg while two females averaged 23 kg.

https://pictures-of-cats.org/average-wei...opard.html

I also heard somewhere else that they are reputed for being a bit on the big side. Quite an interesting set of info.

It could be becouse of the low density of other predators. Sri Lankan are seen as the biggest subspecies becouse they're the apex predator in that area and have no competition.
In depth studies have previously indicated that the original habitat of Anatolian Leopard, (Aegean Region of Anatolia including Mugla and extending all the way to Taurus Mountains) had a disheartening population of 0. Kayaoz added that the next step of their study is going to be taking an accurate inventory of surviving species. He also added that the successful research was a sponsored expedition, however they would make the photograph available only for scientific researchers and institutions upon request.

Field Update from M. Samli on 2/26/02 samlimustafa@qwest.net

The hunter was called Mantolu Hasan who killed more than 15 Anatolian Leopards. Mostly by poison from 50’s to 70’s.
He was an addict…

Some of the leopards that he killed were over 100 kgs. The near extincition of the Anatolian Leopard is due almost entirely to trophy hunting.

This cat was in a Turkish Zoo in the 70’s according to a Turkish volunteer,
who graciously provided us with both of these black and white photos and the colour illustration.

https://bigcatrescue.org/anatolian-leopards/
Some African males, including Kashane

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Monster (huge neck, because leopards will commonly drag prey into trees)

Adult male is easy to identify. Female and young male almost difficult to distinguish.

https://plus.google.com/photos/107007305...f2e6dad801

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