Poll: Who wins?
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Leopard
60.47%
26 60.47%
Komodo Dragon
39.53%
17 39.53%
Total 43 vote(s) 100%
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Leopard v Komodo Dragon
(05-05-2019, 06:26 AM)Bloodborne Wrote:
(05-04-2019, 08:53 AM)Mondas Wrote: ^ & "you do realize" the leopard cub is going to grow up into a big cat, with his varanid-killing skills, down pat.

But the ora won't have a clue about what's gonna hit it, & yeah, it'll duly be 'punked' by the pantherine's blitz-attack.


A Nile monitor being comparable to a Ora, is like a Stray Cat is comparable to a Leopard.

Ok, fixed that a bit, for ya dude...

But yeah, a varanid is a varanid & a true cat is a true cat, morphology-wise, its just a matter of allometry/scaling.
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(05-05-2019, 08:25 AM)Mondas Wrote:
(05-05-2019, 06:26 AM)Bloodborne Wrote:
(05-04-2019, 08:53 AM)Mondas Wrote: ^ & "you do realize" the leopard cub is going to grow up into a big cat, with his varanid-killing skills, down pat.

But the ora won't have a clue about what's gonna hit it, & yeah, it'll duly be 'punked' by the pantherine's blitz-attack.


A Nile monitor being comparable to a Ora, is like a Stray Cat is comparable to a Leopard.

Ok, fixed that a bit, for ya dude...

But yeah, a varanid is a varanid & a true cat is a true cat, morphology-wise, its just a matter of allometry/scaling.
No, because Niles occupy different niche from Oras, live in different enviorments, and their morplology reflects this. Its painfully made clear when 1m+ Ora are relatively safe from predation by wild pigs and dogs, and animals of 20kg are attacking deer and boar, whereas a 20kg Nile wouldent do that.
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Nile crocodile ends up on a leopard's menu in Zambia
Not too long ago, we were marvelling over some stellar snapshots of a jaguar rustlin' and wrasslin' up a caiman entrée in the Brazilian Pantanal; now we have equally impressive footage of an African leopard dispatching a Nile crocodile.
Photographer and safari guide Edward Selfe captured the event, which took place on a recent evening in Zambia's South Luangwa National Park.

"We found this large leopard resting on a fallen tree at dusk," writes Selfe on his website. "He descended and called, starting to mark his territory. We followed for a while and then left him when he went to drink at the river. Returning soon after, we found him ... dragging a carcass through the long grass." 

A few moments later, the photographer realised that the spotted cat's prize was a small crocodile.

It's not exactly a garden-variety leopard kill to witness, but it's also not exactly shocking. Leopards are famously unfussy about food, with a diet that's among the widest-ranging of any large carnivore. We're talking fish and frogs all the way up to hoofed fare the size of eland and young buffalo. An incautious (maybe dozing) little crocodile along the river's edge would be a prime target for the big cat family's über-opportunist.

Leopards in Africa and Asia probably don't eat crocodilians as frequently as some populations of jaguars, for which caimans may constitute major portions of their regular meal ticket. But Selfe's sighting isn't the first time the jaguar's Old World lookalike cousin has been seen chowing down on scaly sustenance. Hal Brindley, for example, photographed a Kruger National Park leopard snatching a somewhat larger Nile croc right from the water and killing it on land.
Tigers and lions (both African and Asiatic) are also occasional hunters of adult crocodilians. (And sometimes good-sized ones: check out this footage of a Bengal tigress attacking a significantly bigger crocodile.) The Florida panther, a North American subspecies of puma, probably hunts small alligators on occasion, and a trail camera produced this neat sequence of a mother panther routing a large gator whose smiling jaws 
 https://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-w...in-zambia/



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(05-04-2019, 06:41 PM)Othodus Megalodno Wrote:
(05-04-2019, 06:18 PM)Mondas Wrote: ^ "You do realize"?

That civet cats are not even cats, let alone leopards, so an ora can learn nothing thereby - for combating a leopard.

The ora's neuro-functional limb control will quickly fail as the leopard's canines penetrate & crush its flimsy brain case,
so any attempt to reach up & claw the leopard off its nape, will likewise fail, too.

Addit:

& FYI, do you realize, both caracal vs varanid interactions shown in the previous pages were 'staged' using set-ups,
of captive creatures, in a zoo, & for a TV show.

Civet cats have a similar body plan as cats, also have claws and more agile than ora. Nile monitors are not macropredatory varanids, they cannot make a deadly bite to a larger animal and can be easily killed by a larger cat. So a leopard can learn nothing there to fight with ora as well.

You definitely underestimate the durability of monitor lizards. In addition to the account with caracal and rock monitor, there are accounts with monitor lizards survived after dog bites on back of the head and neck, and to turn the tables over larger mammalian predators again. Ora has proportionally larger heads than non-macropredatory varanids.

Technically, all carnivorians have a similar body plan.

The civet species you were talking about was the Asian Palm Civet, a rather unimpressive species which mostly eats palm fruits, and i doubt the civet would know how to defend itself against such predators.


Well, a dog is not a leopard.
Being a canid, it lacks the large and thick canines the leopard has.
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(05-05-2019, 01:39 AM)Venom Wrote: How exactly can ora use it's claws or tail against a leopard which is on the back/top of it?
Can ora turn it's arms into 180° degrees? I don't think so.
I think that ora can try to roll its body to put claws up to the leopard... It is difficult to say, because we have no accounts with the physical struggle between similar-sized cats and monitor lizards.

(05-05-2019, 01:39 AM)Venom Wrote: Also, do you have the original link of it? Or it is the only one?
Unfortunately no, but this account is most likely originally a Facebook post.

(05-06-2019, 08:47 PM)Ferox Wrote: Technically, all carnivorians have a similar body plan.

The civet species you were talking about was the Asian Palm Civet, a rather unimpressive species which mostly eats palm fruits, and i doubt the civet would know how to defend itself against such predators.


Well, a dog is not a leopard.
Being a canid, it lacks the large and thick canines the leopard has.
Yes, almost the same things that we can say about comparing rock and nile monitors with ora that Mondas uses as his main argument...
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(05-09-2019, 12:57 AM)Othodus Megalodno Wrote: I think that ora can try to roll its body to put claws up to the leopard... It is difficult to say, because we have no accounts with the physical struggle between similar-sized cats and monitor lizards.

It is difficult to imagine a ora rolling over, when the leopard of similar size is sitting on its back and biting the nape...
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^ Yeah, the leopard won't just be "sitting on its back" dude, it'll be straddling the ora, actively grappling/controlling,
& with those canine teeth pinned deeply into the lizard's vital neurological zones, any movement will increase the hurt.
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