Poll: Who wins?
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Lace Monitor
33.33%
2 33.33%
Black-headed Python
66.67%
4 66.67%
Total 6 vote(s) 100%
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Lace Monitor v Black-headed Python
#1
Lace Monitor - Varanus varius
The Lace Monitor, or Lace Goanna, Varanus varius, is a member of the monitor lizard family, Australian members of which are commonly known as goannas. It belongs to the subgenus Varanus. Their diet typically consists of insects, reptiles, small mammals, birds and birds' eggs. They are also carrion eaters, feeding on already dead carcasses of other wildlife. Lace monitors will also forage in areas inhabited by people, raiding chicken coops for poultry and eggs, rummaging through unprotected domestic garbage bags, and trash cans in picnic and recreational areas. Lace monitors are the second-largest monitor in Australia after the Perentie. Lace monitors are the second-largest monitor in Australia after the perentie. They can be as long as 2.1 m (over 6.8 ft) with a head-and-body length of up to 76.5 cm (2.5 ft). The tail is long and slender and about 1.5 times the length of the head and body. These lizards weigh anywhere from 2- 14kg as adults, and males tend to be at the larger end of this range (4-6 kg) At average. Typically Females AFAIK on will weigh anywhere from 2-4kg. Large (but not the largest) individuals, from what I can discern, weigh anywhere from 8-10 kg.

[Image: normal_R00010-001.jpg]

Black-headed Python - Aspidites melanocephalus
Aspidites melanocephalus, the Black-headed Python, is a species of snake in the family Pythonidae (the python family) that is native to Australia. Adults grow to an average of 5 to 8.25 ft (1.5 to 2m) in length, but can grow to a maximum length of 3.5m, although average specimens are about 2 metres in length. The body is muscular with a flattened profile, while the tail tapers to a thin point. Found in Australia in the northern half of the country, excluding the very arid regions. The diet consists of mainly reptiles but will eat mammals if available.

[Image: 287-Black-headed-Python-near-Barcaldine2.jpg]



(12-06-2018, 11:30 PM)Gusnadieffendi Wrote: Black headed python vs lace monitor
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
Python takes this more than not.
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#3
Lace monitors hunt pythons, black headed pythons hunt monitor lizards, this is really rather a toss up, as to who gets best positioning first. This is not a one sided affair.
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  • Cryolophosaurus, theGrackle
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#4
I believe it depends who gets the first bite. Not many can real out of a python's coils.
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#5
If the lace monitor makes a bite on the head, the python is defeated. If the python bites the monitor's neck, it could kill the monitor by choking. In this particular scenario I favor the monitor. A python needs to be longer to win. But that's just my opinion.
[Image: 1200px-Cryolophosaurus_skeleton_mount_FMNH.jpg]
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#6
(01-01-2019, 11:09 PM)Gusnadieffendi Wrote: Woma python vs mulga snake

You still havent posted in this thread you requested!
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#7
That would also, probably be a mismatch, as Mulga snakes prey upon woma pythons, even thwarting a reintroduction trial of them in the early 2000's


Predation by snakes thwarts trial reintroduction of the Endangered woma python Aspidites ramsayi

Abstract
Case studies of well-documented snake reintroductions are limited, despite their potential value for conservation and ecosystem recovery. The Endangered woma Aspidites ramsayi is a large boid snake that has declined considerably and is now threatened throughout much of central Australia. We describe a trial release of captive-bred womas into the feral predator-free Arid Recovery Reserve in northern South Australia. All of the reintroduced womas were killed within 4 months, with predation by the mulga snake Pseudechis australis confirmed or implied in all cases. Lessons learned for the conditioning of captive-bred snakes for wild release and the role of the mulga snake in structuring Australian arid-zone snake assemblages are discussed.
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/...3BC6A1FFB5
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#8
Is it true that this snake can fight lace monitors
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#9
(06-09-2019, 01:32 AM)Adinda arzi Wrote: Is it true that this snake can fight lace monitors

They have eaten many monitor lizards, yes.
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#10
(06-11-2019, 03:37 PM)Tupinambis Wrote:
(06-09-2019, 01:32 AM)Adinda arzi Wrote: Is it true that this snake can fight lace monitors

They have eaten many monitor lizards, yes.

Yes the blackheaded python has eaten monitors but it hasn't eaten any varanid comparable to the Lace monitor which can reach its length, meaning that it is a much larger reptile. In addition, the lace has powerful recurved and serrated teeth that can literally behead the python if it gets a good bite. 

So yes, it could fight the Lace but the Lace could easily end it as well. The lace has killed large carpet pythons in its home range, however, these interactions go both ways. Comparatively small carpets have killed lace monitors. Its important to note that even olives and scrub pythons, the largest types of pythons which coexist with lace monitors rarely prey on them. The lace monitor is a very formidable varanid that may not be able kill on right out but it will inflict grevious injuries. 

55 lace/45 blackhead
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#11
" Yes the blackheaded python has eaten monitors but it hasn't eaten any varanid comparable to the Lace monitor which can reach its length, meaning that it is a much larger reptile. ​
...
The lace has killed large carpet pythons in its home range, however, these interactions go both ways. Comparatively small carpets have killed lace monitors"





The bicolored text(s) above are a perfect demonstration of a self defeating rebuttal; black headed pythons haven't preyed upon monitors like V.varius, but V. varius have been killed by carpet pythons, arguably a less impressive animal than a black headed python? Its important to note that even olives and scrub pythons, the largest types of pythons which coexist with lace monitors rarely prey on them. Yes, the majority of their diet is wallabies and other mid sized marsupial mammals. Not sure why that's important at all, when this species of python featured feeds largely on lizards( including a couple of monitor species) and snakes. Not sure where you're trying to go with that.



"The lace monitor is a very formidable varanid that may not be able kill on right out but it will inflict grevious injuries."





Undoubtedly so.
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#12
Rip, I meant 55 blackhead/45 lace. I think both reptiles have the capabilities to kill the other but the blackhead should get it more often than not. However, if the lace gets a good grip its game over.

Also, olive pythons are generalists and they have been recorded to eat crocodiles. Not saying that they can't eat lace monitors, but it will be dangerous prey, even for an olive.
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