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Culpeo Zorro (Andean Fox)
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Fossa
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Culpeo Zorro (Andean Fox) v Fossa
#1
Culpeo Zorro (Andean Fox) - Lycalopex culpaeus
The culpeo (Lycalopex culpaeus), sometimes known as the culpeo zorro or Andean fox (wolf), is a South American species of wild dog. It is the second largest native canid on the continent after the maned wolf. In its appearance it bears many similarities to the widely recognized red fox. It has grey and reddish fur, a white chin, reddish legs, and a stripe on its back that may be barely visible. The culpeo's diet consists largely of rodents, rabbits, birds and lizards, and to a lesser extent, plant material and carrion. The culpeo does attack sheep on occasion, and is therefore often hunted or poisoned. In some regions it has become rare, but overall the species is not threatened with extinction. This is a fairly large canid. The mean weight of the much larger male is 11.4 kg (25 lb), while females average 8.4 kg (19 lb). Total length can range from 82 to 152 cm (32 to 60 in), including a tail of 30 to 51 cm (12 to 20 in) in length. The pelage has a fairly attractive, grizzled appearance. The neck and shoulders are often tawny to rufous in color with the upper back is dark. The bushy tail has a black tip.

[Image: 4831951819_d2fbbb1b04_z.jpg]


Fossa - Cryptoprocta ferox
The fossa is a cat-like, carnivorous mammal that is endemic to Madagascar. It is a member of the Eupleridae, a family of carnivorans closely related to the mongoose family (Herpestidae). Its classification has been controversial because its physical traits resemble those of cats, yet other traits suggest a close relationship with viverrids (most civets and their relatives). Its classification, along with that of the other Malagasy carnivores, influenced hypotheses about how many times mammalian carnivores have colonized the island. With genetic studies demonstrating that the fossa and all other Malagasy carnivores are most closely related to each other (forming a clade, recognized as the family Eupleridae), carnivorans are now thought to have colonized the island once around 18 to 20 million years ago. The fossa is the largest mammalian carnivore on the island of Madagascar and has been compared to a small cougar. Adults have a head-body length of 70–80 cm (28–31 in) and weigh between 5.5–8.6 kg (12–19 lb), with the males larger than the females. It has semi-retractable claws and flexible ankles that allow it to climb up and down trees head-first, and also support jumping from tree to tree. 

[Image: Adult-male-fossa-prowling-on-deciduous-forest-floor.jpg]



(09-14-2018, 04:51 PM)Ferox Wrote: Fossa vs Culepo
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
The fossa wins here of course. But i need someone to debate so i can explain my argument.
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#3
Doesn't the canid have a weight advantage over the fossa?
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#4
At average weights it does but not at maximum.
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#5
^Cool. I'll take the fox. The fox is a little bit larger at max. It hunts larger prey with it's larger head and neck. Also, the external genitalia of the fossa could get irreparably damaged (jk). What's your debate @Ferox? Can you change my mind?
A pine needle fell. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it
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#6
theGrackle Wrote:I'll take the fox. The fox is a little bit larger at max. It hunts larger prey with it's larger head and neck.
As you already know larger prey dosent mean youre the more impressive predator. You need evidence to back up your claims. Ill find to what disaproves your claims.


theGrackle Wrote:Also, the external genitalia of the fossa could get irreparably damaged
That isnt neccesary in the battle.
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#7
^ I just wanted to hear your argument. I made a case for the fox, like you asked for. Now defend your fossa. You haven't changed my mind yet. But I am still open to it.
A pine needle fell. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it
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#8
Sorry for delaying. The fossa does have the more effectiv e skull and teeth for killing prey. It also has the mobility advanadge meaning that it has a greater range of movement due allowing it to manipulate and tackle the culepo from different angles. Its greater burning of calories.
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#9
I agree. Weapons wise, the fossa is superior. I have read that they can descend trees face first (like a squirrel), so they must have pretty good articulation in their wrists/ forelimbs. Can you tell me if they are known to grapple at all during conflicts? If they do not, then perhaps, this is close to a 50/50 battle. However, if they do indeed grapple, then I could see the fossa being the victor.
A pine needle fell. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it
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#10
the fossa can kill a common culpeo fox quietly, since the fossa has a long, muscular and agile body, apart the fossa is much larger and heavier than a common culpeo fox (speaking of the subspecies of the fox in center and part of the North of South America); Although it would be different if you face a fox from Tierra del Fuego (Lycalopex culpaeus lycoides) since they are bigger than a fossa and are capable of killing guanacos, I think it would give a different result, so I leave it at 50/50.
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