Poll: Who wins?
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Cape Leopard
66.67%
4 66.67%
Dhole (pack of 2)
33.33%
2 33.33%
Total 6 vote(s) 100%
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Cape Leopard v Dhole (pack of 2)
#1
Cape Leopard - Panthera pardus melanotica
The leopard, Panthera pardus, is a member of the Felidae family and the smallest of the four "big cats" in the genus Panthera, the other three being the tiger, lion, and jaguar .Cape Leopards or Panthera pardus melanotica are much smaller than the African Leopard (Panthera pardus) found in the Kruger National Park.  These have an average weight of 61kg for males, while their Cape counterparts average just over half that.  In the Western Cape, leopards are significantly smaller, males averaging 32 kg and females 20 kg, which makes them in many instances smaller than a large male Caracal. 

[Image: ebd5e199a95a4fdeaf24d5cbda4dcd60.jpg]

Dhole (Pack of 2) - Cuon alpinus
The dhole (Cuon alpinus) is a species of canid native to South and Southeast Asia. It is the only extant member of the genus Cuon, which differs from Canis by the reduced number of molars and greater number of teats. The dholes are classed as endangered by the IUCN, due to ongoing habitat loss, depletion of its prey base, competition from other predators, persecution and possibly diseases from domestic and feral dogs. The dhole is a highly social animal, living in large clans which occasionally split up into small packs to hunt. It primarily preys on medium-sized ungulates, which it hunts by tiring them out in long chases, and kills by disemboweling them. Unlike most social canids (but similar to African wild dogs), dholes let their pups eat first at a kill. Though fearful of humans, dhole packs are bold enough to attack large and dangerous animals such as wild boar, water buffalo, and even tigers. Prey animals in India include chital, sambar, muntjac, mouse deer, swamp deer, wild boar, gaur, water buffalo, banteng, cattle, nilgai, goats, Indian hares, Himalayan field rats and langurs. They are smaller than African wild dogs. Weight ranges from 10 to 25 kg (22 to 55 lb), with males averaging about 4.5 kg (9.9 lb) heavier. This dog is 88 to 113 cm (35 to 44 in) long from the snout to the base of the tail, with the tail averaging 45 cm (18 in) in length. Shoulder height is 42 to 55 cm (17 to 22 in).

[Image: Dholes-resting.jpg]



(09-14-2018, 10:06 PM)Lightning Wrote: Cape leopard vs 2 dholes
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
If a male dhole averages around 20kg, then I think two male dholes can defeat a 32kg male cape leopard but one dhole would probably die in the process.

Because the dholes here have 2 sets of jaws and their bite with serrated teeth designed for tearing flesh is more damaging than the cape leopard's bite and the dholes also have more stamina.
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#3
I somewhere read that indian leopard (male or female) easily attacks and kills 1 or 2 indian wild dogs (similarity of coyotes).
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#4
(09-15-2018, 01:49 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote: I somewhere read that indian leopard (male or female) easily attacks and kills 1 or 2 indian wild dogs (analogue of coyotes).

Yes. But a cape leopard is only half the size of an Indian leopard.
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#5
(09-15-2018, 01:52 AM)Lightning Wrote:
(09-15-2018, 01:49 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote: I somewhere read that indian leopard (male or female) easily attacks and kills 1 or 2 indian wild dogs (analogue of coyotes).

Yes. But a cape leopard is only half the size of an Indian leopard.

It's still a leopard 30 kg +
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#6
(09-15-2018, 01:08 AM)Lightning Wrote: If a male dhole averages around 20kg, then I think two male dholes can defeat a 32kg male cape leopard but one dhole would probably die in the process.

Because the dholes here have 2 sets of jaws and their bite with serrated teeth designed for tearing flesh is more damaging than the cape leopard's bite.
All hypercarnivorous animals permanantly have teeth designed for tearing teeth. Also where did the "dogs having serrated teeth" theory come from. Their long rostrums reduce the shearing action of their carnissals which means it only uses the "angle" part of the carnissals to pierce its prey otherwise it would risk tooth breakage.
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#7
I read someone say in old carnivora that dholes, African wild dogs and bush dogs have serrated teeth (or was it something else). It was a long time ago, I don't remember properly, so I might be wrong.
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  • Ferox
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#8
I change my mind. The cape leopard wins. It's size, strength and grappling forelimbs will enable it to put one dhole out of the fight quite quickly. Then killing the second dhole will be easy.
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  • Ferox
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#9
(09-15-2018, 01:57 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote:
(09-15-2018, 01:52 AM)Lightning Wrote:
(09-15-2018, 01:49 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote: I somewhere read that indian leopard (male or female) easily attacks and kills 1 or 2 indian wild dogs (analogue of coyotes).

Yes. But a cape leopard is only half the size of an Indian leopard.

It's still a leopard 30 kg +
Its only 2kg more. By the sound of this, I assume it is a 32kg Leopard vs 2 25kg Dholes?
Basically it is either going to be 32kg vs 40kg or 32kg vs 50kg.
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#10
(09-18-2018, 03:28 AM)Ryo Wrote: By the sound of this, I assume it is a 32kg Leopard vs 2 25kg Dholes?

I think the average dhole is smaller than 25kg. From the op, it seems 25kg is towards the upper limit of dhole weights.
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