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Is it official that Purrusaurus Brasiliensis is the largest croc of all time?
#16
(02-03-2019, 09:02 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 05:46 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 08:43 AM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 04:32 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(01-26-2019, 07:37 AM)Lightning Wrote: That's sad.

the debate is getting interesting day by day. meanwhile, isnt the estimate of 10 meter and 5 tons too low for a croc?

No, it's perfectly reasonable: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/carnivor...t5584.html

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...Crocodylia

https://www.deviantart.com/randomdinos/a...-703542464

if that is the case, then why does Sarcosuchus weigh 8 tons? shouldn't it be equal to that of Purusaurus?

Well, the original estimate for Sarcosuchus is more than a meter longer than 10 and 10.3 m, and a little length difference can make a surprisingly big weight difference. However, I believe the original research estimate (estimate made by someone who's not a paleontologist) made by Henrique Paes (randomdinos) is better, since it's based on Terminonaris (a close relative of Sarcosuchus) instead of the saltwater crocodile, which makes it only 9.25 meters long and 3 tonnes in weight instead of 11.65 meters long and 8 tonnes in weight.

so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?
Reply
#17
(02-04-2019, 03:17 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 09:02 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 05:46 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 08:43 AM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 04:32 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote: the debate is getting interesting day by day. meanwhile, isnt the estimate of 10 meter and 5 tons too low for a croc?

No, it's perfectly reasonable: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/carnivor...t5584.html

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...Crocodylia

https://www.deviantart.com/randomdinos/a...-703542464

if that is the case, then why does Sarcosuchus weigh 8 tons? shouldn't it be equal to that of Purusaurus?

Well, the original estimate for Sarcosuchus is more than a meter longer than 10 and 10.3 m, and a little length difference can make a surprisingly big weight difference. However, I believe the original research estimate (estimate made by someone who's not a paleontologist) made by Henrique Paes (randomdinos) is better, since it's based on Terminonaris (a close relative of Sarcosuchus) instead of the saltwater crocodile, which makes it only 9.25 meters long and 3 tonnes in weight instead of 11.65 meters long and 8 tonnes in weight.

so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?

Yes
Reply
#18
(02-08-2019, 10:00 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-04-2019, 03:17 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 09:02 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 05:46 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(01-29-2019, 08:43 AM)Moldovan0731 Wrote: No, it's perfectly reasonable: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/carnivor...t5584.html

https://www.researchgate.net/publication...Crocodylia

https://www.deviantart.com/randomdinos/a...-703542464

if that is the case, then why does Sarcosuchus weigh 8 tons? shouldn't it be equal to that of Purusaurus?

Well, the original estimate for Sarcosuchus is more than a meter longer than 10 and 10.3 m, and a little length difference can make a surprisingly big weight difference. However, I believe the original research estimate (estimate made by someone who's not a paleontologist) made by Henrique Paes (randomdinos) is better, since it's based on Terminonaris (a close relative of Sarcosuchus) instead of the saltwater crocodile, which makes it only 9.25 meters long and 3 tonnes in weight instead of 11.65 meters long and 8 tonnes in weight.

so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?

Yes

so what is the latest , official weight of these giant crocs?
Reply
#19
(02-09-2019, 04:15 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-08-2019, 10:00 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-04-2019, 03:17 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 09:02 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 05:46 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote: if that is the case, then why does Sarcosuchus weigh 8 tons? shouldn't it be equal to that of Purusaurus?

Well, the original estimate for Sarcosuchus is more than a meter longer than 10 and 10.3 m, and a little length difference can make a surprisingly big weight difference. However, I believe the original research estimate (estimate made by someone who's not a paleontologist) made by Henrique Paes (randomdinos) is better, since it's based on Terminonaris (a close relative of Sarcosuchus) instead of the saltwater crocodile, which makes it only 9.25 meters long and 3 tonnes in weight instead of 11.65 meters long and 8 tonnes in weight.

so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?

Yes

so what is the latest , official weight of these giant crocs?

If by official you mean peer-reviewed, then 11-12 m, 11.15-12.15 m or 11.65 m and 8 tonnes (based on the saltwater crocodile, Sereno et al. 2001) for Sarcosuchus, 10.6 m for Deinosuchus (based on the American alligator, Farlow et al. 2005), and 10.3 m and 5.16 tonnes for Purussaurus (based on the American alligator, Moreno-Bernal 2007). Henrique Paes (not peer-reviewed) estimates them to be 9.25 m and 3 tonnes (based on Terminonaris), 9 m and 3.5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) and 10 m and 5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) though.
Reply
#20
(02-09-2019, 05:51 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-09-2019, 04:15 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-08-2019, 10:00 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-04-2019, 03:17 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-03-2019, 09:02 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote: Well, the original estimate for Sarcosuchus is more than a meter longer than 10 and 10.3 m, and a little length difference can make a surprisingly big weight difference. However, I believe the original research estimate (estimate made by someone who's not a paleontologist) made by Henrique Paes (randomdinos) is better, since it's based on Terminonaris (a close relative of Sarcosuchus) instead of the saltwater crocodile, which makes it only 9.25 meters long and 3 tonnes in weight instead of 11.65 meters long and 8 tonnes in weight.

so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?

Yes

so what is the latest , official weight of these giant crocs?

If by official you mean peer-reviewed, then 11-12 m, 11.15-12.15 m or 11.65 m and 8 tonnes (based on the saltwater crocodile, Sereno et al. 2001) for Sarcosuchus, 10.6 m for Deinosuchus (based on the American alligator, Farlow et al. 2005), and 10.3 m and 5.16 tonnes for Purussaurus (based on the American alligator, Moreno-Bernal 2007). Henrique Paes (not peer-reviewed) estimates them to be 9.25 m and 3 tonnes (based on Terminonaris), 9 m and 3.5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) and 10 m and 5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) though.

So Sarcosuchus is still holding on to the title?
Reply
#21
(02-10-2019, 05:16 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-09-2019, 05:51 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-09-2019, 04:15 PM)bitisgabonica Wrote:
(02-08-2019, 10:00 PM)Moldovan0731 Wrote:
(02-04-2019, 03:17 AM)bitisgabonica Wrote: so the weights of crocs have decreased down the years right?

Yes

so what is the latest , official weight of these giant crocs?

If by official you mean peer-reviewed, then 11-12 m, 11.15-12.15 m or 11.65 m and 8 tonnes (based on the saltwater crocodile, Sereno et al. 2001) for Sarcosuchus, 10.6 m for Deinosuchus (based on the American alligator, Farlow et al. 2005), and 10.3 m and 5.16 tonnes for Purussaurus (based on the American alligator, Moreno-Bernal 2007). Henrique Paes (not peer-reviewed) estimates them to be 9.25 m and 3 tonnes (based on Terminonaris), 9 m and 3.5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) and 10 m and 5 tonnes (based on the American alligator?) though.

So Sarcosuchus is still holding on to the title?

According to peer-reviewed (you could say these are official) sources, it does, according to Henrique Paes, it doesn't.
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