Poll: Who wins?
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Macrauchenia patagonica
33.33%
1 33.33%
Western Camel
66.67%
2 66.67%
Total 3 vote(s) 100%
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Macrauchenia patagonica v Western Camel
#1
Macrauchenia patagonica
Macrauchenia ("long llama", based on the now superseded Latin term for llamas, Auchenia, from Greek terms which literally mean "big neck") was a long-necked and long-limbed, three-toed South American ungulate mammal, typifying the order Litopterna. The oldest fossils date back to around 7 million years ago, and M. patachonica disappears from the fossil record during the late Pleistocene, around 20,000-10,000 years ago. M. patachonica was the best known member of the family Macraucheniidae, and is known only from fossil finds in South America, primarily from the Lujan Formation in Argentina. Macrauchenia resembled a humpless camel with a short trunk, though it is not closely related to either camels or proboscideans. Macrauchenia was a herbivore, likely living on leaves from trees or grasses. Macrauchenia had a somewhat camel-like body, with sturdy legs, a long neck and a relatively small head. Its feet, however, more closely resembled those of a modern rhinoceros, and had three hoofs each. It was a relatively large animal, with a body length of around 3 metres (9.8 ft) and a weight up to 1042 kg.

[Image: Macrauchenia-patachonica-738x591.jpg]

Western Camel - Camelops hesternus
Camelops is an extinct genus of camel that once roamed western North America, where it disappeared at the end of the Pleistocene about 10,000 years ago. It was very closely related to the Old World Dromedary and Bactrian camel in anatomical form. Plant remains found in its teeth exhibit little grass, suggesting that the camel was an opportunistic herbivore; that is, it ate any plants that were available, as do modern camels. Studies on the Rancho La Brea Camelops hesternus fossils further reveal that rather than being limited to grazing, this species likely ate mixed species of plants, including coarse shrubs growing in coastal southern California. Camelops probably could travel long distances, similar to the living camel.Because soft tissues are generally not preserved in the fossil record, it is not certain if Camelops possessed a hump, like modern camels, or lacked one, like its modern llama relatives. Camelops hesternus was approximately 2.2 m (7.2 ft) tall at the shoulder, making it slightly taller than modern Bactrian camels; it was also slightly heavier, weighing about 800 kg (1,800 lb).

[Image: Camelops-hesternus-738x591.jpg]



(11-08-2018, 06:39 AM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: Camelops hesternus vs Macrauchenia patachonica.
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
I think the camel would win. It appears to have a height advantage, and can likely bite and spit like its modern cousins

Edit: I am not even sure what Macrauchenia could do here. Could this be considered a mismatch?
Mmm, chocolate cake
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#3
@ChocolateCake 123: The Macrauchenia patachonica is basically a huge "camel" because of the convergent evolution. It can do the same as a true camel. I guess the Macrauchenia patachonica will win this fight, because it can fight with large predators such as the terror birds.
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#4
(11-08-2018, 09:16 PM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: @ChocolateCake 123: The Macrauchenia patachonica is basically a huge "camel" because of the convergent evolution. It can do the same as a true camel. I guess the Macrauchenia patachonica will win this fight, because it can fight with large predators such as the terror birds.

Heck, I guess you are right
But if Macrauchenia attempted to fight more ancient South American predators, such as Mapusaurus, it would lose big time.
Mmm, chocolate cake
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#5
Yes. But this is another fight.
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#6
(11-09-2018, 05:47 AM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: Yes. But this is another fight.

That was just an example
Anyhow, at parity, who do you think wins?
Mmm, chocolate cake
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#7
So, who win this fight? The North American camelid or the South American camel-like litoptern?
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#8
Macrauchenia patagonica looks like it is the larger of the two. Since they are so close otherwise, I will go with the bigger animal. Neither has the weapons to inflict a quick death on the other, so this would most likely take some time.
A pine needle fell. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it
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#9
I just searched for "Macrauchenia skull" and "Camelops skull" on Google. The teeth and skull of Macrauchenia look impressive for a herbivore. The teeth are quite sharp. And the nostrils are up, near the top of the skull.
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#10
(Yesterday, 04:22 AM)Claudiu Constantin Nicolaescu Wrote: So, who win this fight? The North American camelid or the South American camel-like litoptern?

Litoptern wins
Mmm, chocolate cake
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