Poll: Who wins?
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Sivatherium giganteum
33.33%
1 33.33%
Shaochilong maortuensis
66.67%
2 66.67%
Total 3 vote(s) 100%
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Sivatherium giganteum v Shaochilong maortuensis
#1
Sivatherium giganteum
Sivatherium ("Shiva's beast") is an extinct genus of giraffid that ranged throughout Africa to the Indian Subcontinent. Sivatherium resembled the modern okapi, but was far larger, and more heavily built. Sivatherium had a wide, antler-like pair of ossicones on its head, and a second pair of ossicones above its eyes. Its shoulders were very powerful to support the neck muscles required to lift the heavy skull. Sivatherium resembled the modern okapi, but was far larger, and more heavily built, being about 2.2 m (7.2 ft) tall at the shoulder, 3 m (9.8 ft) in total height with a weight up to 400–500 kg (880–1,100 lb). A newer estimate has come up with an estimated body mass of about 1,250 kg (2,760 lb). This would make Sivatherium the largest ruminant in history. This weight estimate is thought to be an underestimate, as it does not take into account the large horns possessed by males of the species. Sivatherium had a wide, antler-like pair of ossicones on its head, and a second pair of ossicones above its eyes. Its shoulders were very powerful to support the neck muscles required to lift the heavy skull.

[Image: Sivatherium-giganteum-738x591.jpg]

Shaochilong maortuensis
Shaochilong (meaning "shark toothed dragon") is a genus of carcharodontosaurid dinosaur from the mid Cretaceous (Turonian stage) Ulansuhai Formation of China (about 92 million years ago). The type species, S. maortuensis, was originally named Chilantaisaurus maortuensis, but was re-described and reclassified in 2009. The holotype, IVPP V2885.1-7, consisting of skull fragments, axis and six caudal vertebrae associated to a single individual is the only known specimen. This specimen was discovered in Outer Mongolia and described by Hu in 1964 as a species of Chilantaisaurus.[1] Chure (2002) and Rauhut (2001) suggested that it did not belong to that genus, and was probably a primitive coelurosaur. However, a re-description by Brusatte and colleagues in 2009 found that it was in fact a carcharodontosaurid, the first recognized from Asia. The genus was originally informally named "Alashansaurus". IVPP V2885.1 was probably adult or nearly adult individual. Its length – based on the length of the maxillary tooth row – is estimated of 5 to 6 metres (16 to 20 ft). Estimated length of the femur is 61.5 cm, what suggests that whole animal weighted approximately 500 kilograms (1,100 lb).

[Image: 800px-Shaochilong.jpg]



(11-08-2018, 08:58 PM)ChocolateCake123 Wrote: Sivatherium vs Shaochilong/Concavenator
I am pretty sure that's fair, but if not, can we have 4-6 dire wolves vs Shaochilong?
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
The dinosaur wins with jaws, agility and killer instinct.
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#3
Thanks Taipan, and Lightning for commenting.
I think Shaochilong would win, for the same reasons Lightning stated above. It also has an especially damaging bite, being a carcharodontosaurid. I feel as if it would be able to maneuver around the Sivatherium's powerful legs and kicks, then deliver some killing bites.
Mmm, chocolate cake
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#4
(11-09-2018, 11:56 PM)Lightning Wrote: The dinosaur wins with jaws, agility and killer instinct.

S. giganteum may have been two and half times heavier than the theropod (1,250 kg vs 500 kg), and if it was anything like modern giraffe, it would have had a flexible, powerful neck that could deliver heavy yet precise blows during a fight. S. giganteum wielded more prominent ossicones than the modern giraffe, and given their sharp tips as well, I reckon the giraffid would have been able to gore an opponent with its headgear.

If the theropod commits to an attack, I am not convinced that it could avoid retaliation from the giraffid. There is a massive size disparity between the animals here, and it's heavily in favour of the giraffid. S. giganteum has also got at least 2 inches of hide covering it, and greater bulk. Giraffids are appropriately armed, as explained by the following excerpt.


Quote:We know of eight anecdotal accounts of male giraffes injuring or killing their opponents during combat. In a fight between semicaptive giraffe, one animal was thrown sideways several feet by blows from the other. Dagg and Foster reported a male knocked unconscious by a blow from an opponent; another male was killed when the other punched a hole in its opponent's neck just below the ear, splintering the top vertebrae, which penetrated the spinal column. Resnik photographed a male with a broken and twisted jaw following a blow from an opponent, and Coe recorded a death during "necking" of a captive male giraffe, mistakenly allowed into the enclosure of a similar-sized male.

In three fights recorded in our study between large (old) bulls in northwestern Namibia, head clubbing resulted in the opponent being knocked to the ground on each occasion. The force was sufficient to break an opponent's leg in one encounter, and, in the most violent encounter, a male clubbed his rival to the ground, and the rival was prevented from standing by the opponent stamping its foreleg until death occurred. This is the only known record of a giraffe using its hooves in intraspecific aggression. 

Author: Winning by a Neck: Sexual Selection in the Evolution of Giraffe


I disagree with the current consensus. 

I think the giraffid would be in a viable position to knock down the theropod with a good whack, and subsequently stomp it to death.
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