Poll: Who wins?
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Albertosaurus sarcophagus
100.00%
4 100.00%
Allosaurus fragilis
0%
0 0%
Total 4 vote(s) 100%
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Albertosaurus sarcophagus v Allosaurus fragilis
#1
Albertosaurus sarcophagus
Albertosaurus (meaning "Alberta lizard") is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaurs that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period, about 70 million years ago. The type species, A. sarcophagus, was apparently restricted in range to the modern-day Canadian province of Alberta, after which the genus is named. Scientists disagree on the content of the genus, with some recognizing Gorgosaurus libratus as a second species. As a tyrannosaurid, Albertosaurus was a bipedal predator with tiny, two-fingered hands and a massive head that had dozens of large, sharp teeth. It may have been at the top of the food chain in its local ecosystem. Albertosaurus was smaller than some other tyrannosaurids, such as Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Typical Albertosaurus adults measured up to 9 m (30 ft) long, while rare individuals of great age could grow to be over 10 metres (33 feet) long. Several independent mass estimates, obtained by different methods, suggest that an adult Albertosaurus weighed between 1.3 tonnes and 1.7 tonnes (1.9 tons).

[Image: Albertosaurus1.jpg]

Allosaurus fragilis
Allosaurus is a genus of carnivorous theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian). Allosaurus was a typical large theropod, having a massive skull on a short neck, a long tail and reduced forelimbs. Allosaurus fragilis, the best-known species, had an average length of 8.5 m (28 ft), with the largest definitive Allosaurus specimen (AMNH 680) estimated at 9.7 meters (32 feet) long, and an estimated weight of 2.3 metric tons (2.5 short tons). As with dinosaurs in general, weight estimates are debatable, and since 1980 have ranged between 1,500 kilograms (3,300 pounds), 1,000 to 4,000 kg (2,200 to 8,800 lb), and 1,010 kilograms (2,230 pounds) for modal adult weight (not maximum). John Foster, a specialist on the Morrison Formation, suggests that 1,000 kg (2,200 lb) is reasonable for large adults of A. fragilis, but that 700 kg (1,500 lb) is a closer estimate for individuals represented by the average-sized thigh bones he has measured. Using the subadult specimen nicknamed "Big Al", researchers using computer modelling arrived at a best estimate of 1,500 kilograms (3,300 lb) for the individual, but by varying parameters they found a range from approximately 1,400 kilograms (3,100 lb) to approximately 2,000 kilograms (4,400 lb).

[Image: AllosaurusSP2008_2689.jpg]



(11-09-2018, 09:22 PM)Are thou sleepy Wrote: Allosaurus vs Albertosaurus.
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#2
I'm not too sure on what their average weights would be, but I feel as if Allosaurus would be larger. But would it be large enough for it to win? Because at parity, I'm backing Albertosaurus. It has a more damaging bite and despite being a gracile tyrannosaurid, seems to be more robust than Allosaurus.
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#3
(11-09-2018, 11:42 PM)Are thou sleepy Wrote: I'm not too sure on what their average weights would be, but I feel as if Allosaurus would be larger. But would it be large enough for it to win? Because at parity, I'm backing Albertosaurus. It has a more damaging bite and despite being a gracile tyrannosaurid, seems to be more robust than Allosaurus.

Albertosaurus weighs 2 tons. I would back it as well because of the stronger bite, but otherwise 50/50.
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#4
Well, this image and this image, both done by Randomdinos, suggest that an Albertosaurus seems to approach and potentially exceed the three ton mark.

In terms of comparison, if John Foster's analysis of a 700-1000kg A. Fragilis holds water, then I'd favor the Tyrannosaur on the grounds that it is much heavier. That being said, truth be told I havent read a whole lot of literature on Allosaurus. If anyone has a more concrete mass analysis, I'd love to read it over. Would be more reliable than two lines that were copy-pasted from the animal's wikipedia.
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#5
I will support the more heavily built albertosaurus.
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#6
id go with Albertosaurus it has the stronger bite its around 2600 kgs and research is suggesting that the Tyrannosaurids are better at making faster turns than the other large theropods https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._theropods
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