Poll: Who wins?
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Eurasian Lynx
53.85%
14 53.85%
Olive Baboon
46.15%
12 46.15%
Total 26 vote(s) 100%
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Eurasian Lynx v Olive Baboon
(03-20-2019, 12:07 AM)MMauro20 Wrote:
(03-19-2019, 02:27 PM)Mondas Wrote: This is a 1-on-1 match though, & solo baboons are more likely to activate a 'flight response' rather than a 'fight response',
esp' when confronted by a wild cat in the form of an E-lynx, being a focussed hypercarnivore, & expertly intense killer.
No, we always assume both animals are willing to fight here. Also, single baboons have attacked large carnivores many times, and are in all likelihood more aggressive than the lynx.

Do you think that, because it takes a group of baboons to deal with leopards, the same will be true for a weaker feline like the lynx? What kind of logic is that?
 Meanwhile , What has an individual baboon ever done to a similar size or larger predator?
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Shin Wrote:Meanwhile , What has an individual baboon ever done to a similar size or larger predator?
You already had that answered on page ten, right here.
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This single baboon was attacked by guard dogs, escaped, but not before breaking a rottweiler's leg:
Quote:Baboon attacks dogs, caretaker

An alleged stray baboon attack has left both master and man’s best friend nursing a bruised ego and a broken left hind leg, respectively.

According to Thuso Makoa, the incident took place in the early hours of Sunday.

“I was sitting by the fire when I heard a strange sound and I went to investigate. It was as if someone had dropped something over the fence. As I was walking in an alley, I couldn’t believe my eyes.”

Makoa said there, in front of him, was a baboon with a chain around its waist.

Then it lunged at him, he said.

“I turned around and ran for my life, and hid in one of the alleys,”

“As the dogs chased the animal around the yard, I managed to scramble to my room where, after a few minutes, I heard one of the dogs yelping in pain. As Makoa opened the door of his room, he said he saw one of the guard dogs, a female Rottweiler, rushing towards him, dragging its left hind leg and in obvious pain. He said he stayed in his room until daybreak as he was too scared to even save the dog from the attacker.

Makoa is still visibly shaken by the ordeal, days after the alleged attack.

“I wanted to save it(the dog), but I was too afraid and I hid in my room until around 5am,” he recalled.

He said that he was so terrified that he couldn’t fall asleep on the night as he wondered what could have happened to his two dogs.

“In the morning, when I decided to look for the dogs, I could only find the male, and as I searched further, found the female lying on the ground, injured and unable to move. I was heartbroken to see her lying(down) like that,” said Makoa.

Makoa, who works as a caretaker at the Holy Cross Anglican Church in Nyanga, said the dogs were donated by businessman Peter Motale two years ago after the facility had become a target of burglars and vandals.
Source: https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Local...r-20160727

Male rottweilers typically weigh 50–60 kg (110–132 lb) and females 35–48 kg (77–106 lb) - and the baboon was attacked by both at the same time.

For comparison, in this case two rottweilers were enough to break an adult cow's legs and kill her:
Quote:Dogs attack and kill ‘full-grown, pregnant mama cow with a calf at her side’

A local man is still looking for answers after two dogs attacked and killed a “pregnant mama cow with a calf at her side” Monday.

Alexander City Police responded to North Central Avenue after John Ballard reported that two full-grown Rottweilers attacked the cow that was in a pasture on his farm.

“It was horrible,” Ballard said. “I’ve seen dogs get after a calf, but not a full-grown, pregnant mama cow with a calf at her side. They got her by the ears and took her down and broke down by her hind legs. Once they did that it was over.”

Ballard said that one of the men who works with him fired at the dogs, hitting one. But as of Tuesday evening both dogs were still alive.

To show how vicious the attack was, Ballard said the cow weighed 1,200 pounds. The animal received multiple injuries and Ballard said both ears had been ripped off by the dogs.

“We know which dogs they were and who the owners are,” Ballard said. “We are supposed to meet with them tonight and see what we can work out.

“It’s just a tough thing to see and the bad thing is we have kids who ride four-wheelers out there. If they break down they have to walk back. If that had been a kid, there is no telling what could have happened.”

Since the incident was in the police jurisdiction and outside the city limits, animal control does not have the authority to pick up the dogs.

“We had people out there and the owners saw the dogs and shot one of them,” Alexander City Police Chief Jay Turner said. “There are no charges at this time. We’ve talked with the owner of the cow and the owners of the dogs and they are going to negotiate to see what can be worked out.

“The thought of a full-grown cow being killed by dogs, even large dogs is unbelievable. But when they get in a pack in that hunting mode, I’m told that even the most docile dog can do things like this.”

Turner and Ballard both pointed out that there is no dog ordinance in place in the county.

That means that while dog owners are liable for damage, they are not under any obligation to keep their dogs off the property of others. Animals that have been implicated in these kinds of incidents can’t be seized by city animal control officers.

“I find it hard to believe that when something like this happens, there is no recourse to make sure the dogs can never do this kind of thing again,” Ballard said. “I hope this prompts someone to take some action to put an ordinance in place to protect people from this kind of thing.”

Tallapoosa County Commissioner T.C. Coley who represents that area said that they have struggled with situations like this in the past because while the Alexander City Police Department can enforce state laws, city ordinances like the dog ordinance are a different story.

“This isn’t the first time we’ve had a situation like this and it’s an unfortunate thing,” Coley said. “We are open to finding a solution that works. The issue is the cost of enforcing a countywide dog ordinance would be almost impossible. But if there is a way that we could find a way to enforce that law in the city’s police jurisdiction even though it is outside of the city limits would be an answer.”
Source: https://www.alexcityoutlook.com/2017/03/...-her-side/
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(03-20-2019, 05:07 AM)zergthe Wrote:
Shin Wrote:Meanwhile , What has an individual baboon ever done to a similar size or larger predator?
You already had that answered on page ten, right here.

 Meanwhile you can't even prove that the Baboon did any of the damage by itself. Not to mention, it was a dead baboon. It seems those who support the primates over felines, have to reach considerably far to find any  legitimate instance of them being able to dominate  A formidable predator. Seeing as how the baboon died it's not really evidence of them being capable in a conflict involving a feline larger than themselves. Factoring in how you were the guys who wants to Believe that chimps can hunt and  kill adult Leopards as well.I generally wouldn't be using a fluke incident, that features the creature that I'm backing up having died in the interaction as proof of their combat competence. all you have proved is that in interactions with felines, we can be sure that the baboon is usually going to be the one who dies.
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"In interactions with leopards", you mean. And yet, from the looks of it, they are way more dangerous to a leopard than a lynx ever would be.

Also, two rottweilers are more dangerous than a Eurasian lynx.
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G
(03-20-2019, 06:37 AM)I\m DMauro20 Wrote: "In interactions with leopards", you mean. And yet, from the looks of it, they are way more dangerous to a leopard than a lynx ever would be.

Also, two rottweilers are more dangerous than a Eurasian lynx.

  The reality is, posters like yourself keep trying to downgrade the potential that a larger end feline possesses. You're talking up Rottweilers while the Eurasian lynx dominates wolves.
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So you believe a lynx would win against two rottweilers? And your evidence is lynx killing wolf pups or pregnant wolves, most likely by ambush? Or do you have problems with my assertion that the lynx would be little threat to a leopard?
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For not mentioning that the Wolf that got "killed" by a Lynx had mange and did not lose a fight to the death, but fled and likely died of infections and diseases later on. Which is longer term.
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It's ironic how Shin accuses people of using flukes and such, then brings this sort of thing up.
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(03-20-2019, 06:41 AM)Shin Wrote: G
(03-20-2019, 06:37 AM)I\m DMauro20 Wrote: "In interactions with leopards", you mean. And yet, from the looks of it, they are way more dangerous to a leopard than a lynx ever would be.

Also, two rottweilers are more dangerous than a Eurasian lynx.

  The reality is, posters like yourself keep trying to downgrade the potential that a larger end feline possesses. You're talking up Rottweilers while the Eurasian lynx dominates wolves.
Yes, the Eurasian lynx killing pregnant wolves and a fight between a male that was not confirmed to have killed the wolf, documented by a blog post. Clearly much better then the numerous sources that reference and document accounts of baboons killing leopards.

If you want a single baboon doing something to a impressive wild predator, look here:
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"adult male wolf plausibly died being wounded after a fight with a male lynx (Naliboki Forest, April 2017)."

https://sidorovich.blog/2017/09/06/wolves-and-lynxes/
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(03-20-2019, 08:34 AM)ImperialPuma Wrote: "adult male wolf plausibly died being wounded after a fight with a male lynx (Naliboki Forest, April 2017)."

https://sidorovich.blog/2017/09/06/wolves-and-lynxes/
Have you read the later comments, like Bloodborne's?
Bloodborne Wrote:Yes, the Eurasian lynx killing pregnant wolves and a fight between a male that was not confirmed to have killed the wolf, documented by a blog post. Clearly much better then the numerous sources that reference and document accounts of baboons killing leopards.
We know about this report already, and it clearly is less reliable than most baboon accounts posted here, which you people love to nitpick.
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Check the field research studies, since the extirpation of leopards from much of Eurasia, the lynx has assumed their role.

E-lynx take fair-sized ungulates, larger than any solo baboon could subdue & kill, & even dominate sympatric wolverines.

Quite evidently, certain primate fans are working hard to downplay the capabilities of the E-lynx, but they're failing.
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