Poll: Who wins?
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Lion (Coalition of 3/4)
50.00%
2 50.00%
White Rhinoceros
50.00%
2 50.00%
Total 4 vote(s) 100%
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Lion (Coalition of 3/4) v White Rhinoceros
#1
Lion (Coalition of 3/4) - Panthera leo
The lion (Panthera leo) is one of the four big cats in the genus Panthera, and a member of the family Felidae. With some males exceeding 250 kg (550 lb) in weight, it is the second-largest living cat after the tiger. Wild lions currently exist in Sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia with an endangered remnant population in Gir Forest National Park in India, having disappeared from North Africa and Southwest Asia in historic times. Until the late Pleistocene, about 10,000 years ago, the lion was the most widespread large land mammal after humans. They were found in most of Africa, across Eurasia from western Europe to India, and in the Americas from the Yukon to Peru. The lion is a vulnerable species, having seen a possibly irreversible population decline of thirty to fifty percent over the past two decades in its African range. The African lion is a very large cat, with males weighing between 330 and 550 pounds and females weighing between 260 and 400 pounds. It is 8 to 10 feet long, not including the tail. Its most famous feature is its mane, which only male lions have. The mane is a yellow color when the lion is young and darkens with age. Eventually, the mane will be dark brown. The body of the African lion is well suited for hunting. It is very muscular, with back legs designed for pouncing and front legs made for grabbing and knocking down prey. It also has very strong jaws that enable it to eat the large prey that it hunts.

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White Rhinoceros - Ceratotherium simum
The White Rhinoceros or Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is one of the five species of rhinoceros that still exist. It has a wide mouth used for grazing and is the most social of all rhino species. White Rhinoceroses are found in grassland and savannah habitat. Herbivore grazers that eat grass, preferring the shortest grains, the White Rhinoceros is one of the largest pure grazers. White Rhinoceroses produce sounds which include a panting contact call, grunts and snorts during courtship, squeals of distress, and deep bellows or growls when threatened. Threat displays (in males mostly) include wiping its horn on the ground and a head-low posture with ears back, combined with snarl threats and shrieking if attacked. The White Rhinoceros is quick and agile and can run 50 km/h (31 mph). The White Rhinoceros is the world's largest land mammal after the three species of elephant. It has a massive body and large head, a short neck and broad chest. The head and body length is 3.4 to 4.2 m (11 to 14 ft), with the tail adding another 37 to 71 cm (15 to 28 in). Shoulder height is 1.5 to 2 m (4 ft 10 in to 6 ft 7 in). Weight in this animal typically ranges from 1,360 to 3,630 kg (3,000 to 8,000 lb). The male, averaging 2,300 kg (5,100 lb) is slightly heavier than the female, at an average of 1,700 kg (3,700 lb). The largest recorded White Rhinoceros was about 4,500 kg (9,900 lb). On its snout it has two horn-like growths, one behind the other. These are made of solid keratin, in which they differ from the horns of bovids (cattle and their relatives), which are keratin with a bony core, and deer antlers, which are solid bone. The front horn is larger and averages 90 cm (35 in) in length, reaching as much as 150 cm (59 in).

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(12-05-2018, 10:34 PM)ScottishWildcat Wrote: Now that we have a more reasonable number for the Savuti Pride, maybe them vs a white rhino or an Asian Elephant?

Let's try this!
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
Good call, but I would maybe have added a lion or two all the same.

This is enough to kill a black rhino, but I don’t think a white rhino will die to this many lions any time soon
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#3
(12-06-2018, 09:21 PM)ScottishWildcat Wrote: This is enough to kill a black rhino, but I don’t think a white rhino will die to this many lions any time soon

There are no records of Lions in any number killing adult Black Rhinos even though they are smaller than White Rhinos. There are records of Lions killing the larger adult White Rhinos however. Interestingly, there are records of Black Rhinos killing Lions, but no records of White Rhinos killing Lions. It seems the greater speed, agility and aggression of the Black Rhino over the White Rhino is more important than than size.

Below two inexperienced lions killed an adult female White Rhino. Four adult males should have a good chance against an adult male Rhino IMO.

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[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
[-] The following 2 users Like Taipan's post:
  • Lightning, ScottishWildcat
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#4
Interesting! I don’t think I completely change my opinion though. 4 lions probably, but not 3. Were any of the white rhinos killed adult males?
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#5
I am actually thinking that this could go either way with 4 lions because this time the rhino is trying to kill them as well. With 3 lions, I agree with SWC that the rhino should win that one.
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#6
Another toughie, though given how durable rhinos are, I lean slightly towards them though lions work great in a team.
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#7
It would take a miracle for the rhino to manage to stab more than 1 lion in a single fight. It's extremely difficult for each side to kill the other but 3/4 lions killing the rhino is far more likely than the rhino managing to kill all 3/4 lions.
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#8
I don’t think a ‘stab’ is necessary per say, it could just as easily ram or trample a misplaced lion (if it could somehow catch one that is). Do rhinos do damage to one another in intra/interspecific fights using their bite?
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#9
(12-07-2018, 08:33 AM)ScottishWildcat Wrote: I don’t think a ‘stab’ is necessary per say, it could just as easily ram or trample a misplaced lion (if it could somehow catch one that is). Do rhinos do damage to one another in intra/interspecific fights using their bite?

It would take a miracle for the far slower, less agile rhino to do any of that to more than 1 lion in a fight.

I'm not aware of African rhinos ever doing this.
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