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What if 1605 Australia replaced by Late Pleistocene Australia
#1
What if one year before the discovery of Australia by the Dutch. An random omnipotent being decided for fun to replace Australia as what it is right now back to the way it was back in the Late Pleistocene.

Which means

[Image: Pleistocene-Australia-738x591.jpg]

By the time the Captain James Cook and his crew landed. The land they found wasn't one inhabited by Australian aborigines but rather various unknown megafauna not yet known to them such as 20 foot long goannas, hippopotamus sized wombats, 500 pound kangaroos, terrestrial crocodiles and cat-like marsupials.

How different would colonization and history go down for Australia in this timeline?
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#2
The people would have to learn to coexist with these animals some which are dangerouse but a society will eventually be built.
[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRvrzjqcLyE2x1TQvejwfq...4IDvD2d3Tt]
OldMan
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  • theGrackle
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#3
My speculation on this scenario.

Nothing much would honestly change. No indigenous people in Australia wouldn't have as much of an impact as no indigenous people in the New World given the lack of agriculture being the Aborigines were 40,000 years behind.

Without any indigenous people though Europeans would likely bring slaves over to fill in their place and maybe even tame diprotodon as a beast of burden for heavy use of work.

Most of the megafauna I don't see faring pretty well especially the carnivores. Megalania and quinkana I feel would be wiped out long before conversation efforts arrive given their dragon like appearances would likely install fear into the European colonists and so a bounty would probably be in place. Marsupial lion I give better odds but wouldn't expect to see survive either given what happened to the Tasmanian tiger but if it did I'd probably only be living in the very remote parts. Procoptodon and genyornis I see faring well being they're just bigger kangaroos and emus thus packs more meat. The latter I can see farming by the present like they do with ostriches and emus. Dingoes also won't exist being they got to Australia through tradings between Indonesians and Aborigines in the Northern Territory.

I also feel that Australia would draw in Charles Darwin's interest more then the Galapagos Islands and so would be more focused on that.

The only question that would remain is would Australia still be claimed by the same settlement or a different one and would the continent still be named Australia or would it even actually as far have borders?

At least that's my two cents.
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#4
^Pretty much. Nothing much changes, everything bigger than a kangaroo gets slaughtered the same way it happened in America and society goes on. Only with no Aboriginal people that means white toursists can walk on Uluru I guess
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#5
(02-12-2019, 01:20 PM)ScottishWildcat Wrote: ^Pretty much. Nothing much changes, everything bigger than a kangaroo gets slaughtered the same way it happened in America and society goes on. Only with no Aboriginal people that means white toursists can walk on Uluru I guess

As said though only ones I could see surviving are diprotodons (Potential use for a beast of burden like heavy work), procoptodon (Bigger kangaroo so more meat especially for factories by the present), geoyornis (Same as procoptodon given more meat and so likely farmed as ostriches and emus are) and maybe the marsupial lion if it can survive in the very remote parts.

Thus we could expect to see these in zoos then if that's the case.

Otherwise agreed.
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