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Why domestics cats not warm-hearted, loyal like domestics dogs?
#16
Some cat breeds, & certain individual cats show a greater level of social interactivity/affection/liking for people.

It is no coincidence that the most social wild cat, the lion, can also often be notably congenial with people, too.

Pet dogs tend to want to make demonstrative displays, or 'show off', plus being needy-dependent & insecure,
(often howling insessantly when left alone at home) whereas cats are much more choosy about what they show.

But cats have been shown to accept toilet-training, literally learning to appreciate the use of the human toilet,
something few dogs appear to be able to grasp/manage.

A dog will habitually suffer the neglect/abuse of a bad owner much more than a cat will usually do, some
cats will shift home of their own accord, & for their own reasons, even if they are not being mistreated.
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#17
I posted this already, but I'm posting it again
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dwjS_eI-lQ
Go to like 3:40 and then watch for another 1-2 minutes.

Dogs are routinely hypersocial with humans. They are extremely eager to form an emotional bond with people. No other domesticated species is like that, not even cats. Cats can form emotional bonds with people, I'm not denying that, but they don't do it with the ease or the frequency at which dogs do.
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#18
Quote:Zak therefore took saliva samples from all of the companions, both shortly before and after a playful stint with their owners, and measured oxytocin levels. While studies have already shown that both dogs and their owners release oxytocin while gazing into one another’s eyes, likely facilitating the formation of and strengthening close relationships, fewer homework helper studies have looked at cats.
On average, dogs were found to produce almost five times as much oxytocin than cats after frolicking with their human companions, with saliva levels rising by 57.2 percent and 12 percent from initial levels, respectively. In addition, only half of the cats actually demonstrated raised levels of oxytocin. While this doesn’t mean that “dogs[/b] [b]love us five times more than cats do,” it does at least seem to make sense.

I still think that it depends on the attitude of the pet to the owner. I had a cat that was smarter and even more loyal to me than any dog might have been. I'm reading now Cold Paws, Warm Heart by Debra DeBlock-Hayford to my kids and hope they get the essence of the power of love that we can give to our pets.
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#19
This is a joke. Dogs aren't "loyal", they're bound by instinct. And who are you to say that cats aren't "heartwarming"? I'll take any domestic cat over a nasty ugly pitbull, as far as "heartwarming" is concerned.
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#20
From my personal experience, both animals show show their affection in different ways. My cat seems to like attention and pets but in moderate amounts and generally she is not super needy. Her overall personality is calm for the most part. My dog seems to love attention and whines loudly when i ignore him but he's also independent and loves to escape my yard and explore the world before coming back home for dinner. Overall, I find dogs to be more willing to pay attention you, listening to your tone of voice and less independent/willing to bond over activities besides food than cats. Cats do pay attention to you but they have their priorities first which are eating and patrolling their territory. Litter training is actually instinctive in cats which is why dogs have a hard time in comparison. As much as I love canids, I think cats make a easier pet overall due to being more independent and less needy. Remember that most of this is from my interpretation so take it with a grain of salt.

The cold cat and loyal loving dog are overgeneralized stereotypes. There are cases of loyal cats defending owners and dogs that just leave the yard one night and ends up loving a completely different family. And of course, there's the animals that do fit the stereotypes of their species.

An explanation for the behaviors observed in the domestic animals is their ancestry. For example, Domestic Cats came from the African Wildcat which is a solitary felid while domestic dogs came from either a wolf like canid or extinct sub-species of grey wolf where it was essential to form ranks or bonds with each other to survive. Here you can see why dogs are much more needy than cats are when it comes to affection, needs and attention. Of course, dogs and cats respond to humans differently than to their own species but the basis for their responses can be contributed to their genetic heritage.

It's also important to remember dogs were originally bred for specific tasks that required not only different physical traits but temperaments as well. Their ability to not only complete the task but also how well they worked with humans is what influenced the dog's need to bond with homo sapiens. This is why a lot of breed descriptions describe some dog breeds being more affectionate than others. Toy Poodles have been bred to be dotting lap dogs that are constantly near humans while Bloodhounds were bred to track prey for miles on end with or without a human guide. One breed's majority is bound to be more affectionate than the other due to the selective pressures of their niche.

Cats on the other hand were not bred for specific tasks besides rodent control so there wasn't much selective pressure to develop hyper social bonds with humans the way dogs do. Not saying that different cat breeds don't have different temperaments. They do. But it's not to the extant to what the domestic dog has gone through over the course of it's domestication.

In a alternate universe, we would be having the thread about why are dogs so cold compared to loyal cats. Dogs would have been domesticated from a completely solitary canid like a fox or Maned Wolf while cats were domesticated from a social felid like lions which have rankings and strong bonds. This is my 2 cents to this thread.
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#21
(03-19-2019, 10:33 AM)K9Bite Wrote: From my personal experience, both animals show show their affection in different ways. My cat seems to like attention and pets but in moderate amounts and generally she is not super needy. Her overall personality is calm for the most part.  My dog seems to love attention and whines loudly when i ignore him but he's also independent and loves to escape my yard and explore the world before coming back home for dinner. Overall, I find dogs to be more willing to pay attention you, listening to your tone of voice and less independent/willing to bond over activities besides food than cats. Cats do pay attention to you but they have their priorities first which are eating and patrolling their territory. Litter training is actually instinctive in cats which is why dogs have a hard time in comparison. As much as I love canids, I think cats make a easier pet overall due to being more independent and less needy. Remember that most of this is from my interpretation so take it with a grain of salt.

The cold cat and loyal loving dog are overgeneralized stereotypes. There are cases of loyal cats defending owners and dogs that just leave the yard one night and ends up loving a completely different family. And of course, there's the animals that do fit the stereotypes of their species.

An explanation for the behaviors observed in the domestic animals is their ancestry. For example, Domestic Cats came from the African Wildcat which is a solitary felid while domestic dogs came from either a wolf like canid or extinct sub-species of grey wolf where it was essential to form ranks or bonds with each other to survive. Here you can see why dogs are much more needy than cats are when it comes to affection, needs and attention. Of course, dogs and cats respond to humans differently than to their own species but the basis for their responses can be contributed to their genetic heritage.

It's also important to remember dogs were originally bred for specific tasks that required not only different physical traits but temperaments as well. Their ability to not only complete the task but also how well they worked with humans is what influenced the dog's need to bond with homo sapiens. This is why a lot of breed descriptions describe some dog breeds being more affectionate than others. Toy Poodles have been bred to be dotting lap dogs that are constantly near humans while Bloodhounds were bred to track prey for miles on end with or without a human guide. One breed's majority is bound to be more affectionate than the other due to the selective pressures of their niche.

Cats on the other hand were not bred for specific tasks besides rodent control so there wasn't much selective pressure to develop hyper social bonds with humans the way dogs do. Not saying that different cat breeds don't have different temperaments. They do. But it's not to the extant to what the domestic dog has gone through over the course of it's domestication.

In a alternate universe, we would be having the thread about why are dogs so cold compared to loyal cats. Dogs would have been domesticated from a completely solitary canid like a fox or Maned Wolf while cats were domesticated from a social felid like lions which have rankings and strong bonds. This is my 2 cents to this thread.

Excellent comment. I also want to bring to your attention that Red Foxes have been legit domesticated, commonly called "Silver Foxes". Their behavior and temperament is different from dogs
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#22
Aren't those 'pet' foxes the result of selective breeding for docility, done in Russian fur-farms, to reduce 'wildness'?

Similar things have been done with hybrid crosses between domestic cats & small wildcat species.

(Also applicable to the 'tame' Russian lynx, as seen on youtube).
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#23
Tame Lynxes don't come in exotic unnatural colors. The foxes are domesticated, pure and simple
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#24
The larger cats just seem more intelligent with a better capability to bond than the small felinse does. I was told anecdotally (and thus never got it confirmed) That house cats are more likely to leave their young behind than the bigger felines.
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#25
(03-19-2019, 10:33 AM)K9Bite Wrote: From my personal experience, both animals show show their affection in different ways. My cat seems to like attention and pets but in moderate amounts and generally she is not super needy. Her overall personality is calm for the most part.  My dog seems to love attention and whines loudly when i ignore him but he's also independent and loves to escape my yard and explore the world before coming back home for dinner. Overall, I find dogs to be more willing to pay attention you, listening to your tone of voice and less independent/willing to bond over activities besides food than cats. Cats do pay attention to you but they have their priorities first which are eating and patrolling their territory. Litter training is actually instinctive in cats which is why dogs have a hard time in comparison. As much as I love canids, I think cats make a easier pet overall due to being more independent and less needy. Remember that most of this is from my interpretation so take it with a grain of salt.

The cold cat and loyal loving dog are overgeneralized stereotypes. There are cases of loyal cats defending owners and dogs that just leave the yard one night and ends up loving a completely different family. And of course, there's the animals that do fit the stereotypes of their species.

An explanation for the behaviors observed in the domestic animals is their ancestry. For example, Domestic Cats came from the African Wildcat which is a solitary felid while domestic dogs came from either a wolf like canid or extinct sub-species of grey wolf where it was essential to form ranks or bonds with each other to survive. Here you can see why dogs are much more needy than cats are when it comes to affection, needs and attention. Of course, dogs and cats respond to humans differently than to their own species but the basis for their responses can be contributed to their genetic heritage.

It's also important to remember dogs were originally bred for specific tasks that required not only different physical traits but temperaments as well. Their ability to not only complete the task but also how well they worked with humans is what influenced the dog's need to bond with homo sapiens. This is why a lot of breed descriptions describe some dog breeds being more affectionate than others. Toy Poodles have been bred to be dotting lap dogs that are constantly near humans while Bloodhounds were bred to track prey for miles on end with or without a human guide. One breed's majority is bound to be more affectionate than the other due to the selective pressures of their niche.

Cats on the other hand were not bred for specific tasks besides rodent control so there wasn't much selective pressure to develop hyper social bonds with humans the way dogs do. Not saying that different cat breeds don't have different temperaments. They do. But it's not to the extant to what the domestic dog has gone through over the course of it's domestication.

In a alternate universe, we would be having the thread about why are dogs so cold compared to loyal cats. Dogs would have been domesticated from a completely solitary canid like a fox or Maned Wolf while cats were domesticated from a social felid like lions which have rankings and strong bonds. This is my 2 cents to this thread.

Perfect. In short:

- Dogs evolved from a species that already lived in groups. So your social behavior is more complex.

- The dog has evolved to understand human signs. They are exceptionally good at reading facial expressions and human gestures. That makes our communication easier today.

- The power of the dogs is in your backpack. So they depend much more on each other (and now, on humans).


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Quote:The larger cats just seem more intelligent with a better capability to bond than the small felinse does. I was told anecdotally (and thus never got it confirmed) That house cats are more likely to leave their young behind than the bigger felines.

Octopuses are very intelligent, but they are antisocial and cannibals. I think the term "intelligent" is a bit unfair here.
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#26
Maybe intelligent wasn't the right use, but the larger feline to me, generally seem to bond more well with their humans.
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#27
(03-24-2019, 04:18 AM)Oculus Kageyamii Wrote: Tame Lynxes don't come in exotic unnatural colors. The foxes are domesticated, pure and simple

You are missing the point.

Both were 'fur farmed' & while the lynx pelts were wanted 'au naturel', the 'silver fox' pelage was deemed
more desirable than the base colour, & thus duly selected for, (as was docility, for both animals),
in a longitudinal breeding program.
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#28
(03-24-2019, 04:53 AM)Ryo Wrote: Maybe intelligent wasn't the right use, but the larger feline to me, generally seem to bond more well with their humans.

Larger felines have eaten there owners..... Great bond......
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#29
(04-07-2019, 06:13 AM)Felinepower Wrote:
(03-24-2019, 04:53 AM)Ryo Wrote: Maybe intelligent wasn't the right use, but the larger feline to me, generally seem to bond more well with their humans.

Larger felines have eaten there owners..... Great bond......
Then you can wonder how often house cats would have done the same if they were the same size. And they are the domesticated one of the 2.
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#30
But why would anyone keep any kind/size of cat ( or any other pet) which is untrustworthy?
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