Poll: Who wins?
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Pantanal Jaguar
72.73%
8 72.73%
Muskox
27.27%
3 27.27%
Total 11 vote(s) 100%
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Pantanal Jaguar v Muskox
#1
Pantanal Jaguar - Panthera onca palustris
The jaguar (Panthera onca) is a big cat, a feline in the Panthera genus, and is the only Panthera species found in the Americas. The jaguar is the third-largest feline after the tiger and the lion, and the largest in the Western Hemisphere. The jaguar's present range extends from Southern United States and Mexico across much of Central America and south to Paraguay and northern Argentina. A study of the Jaguar in the Brazilian Pantanal region found average weights of 100 kilograms (220 lb) and weights of 136 kilograms (300 lb) or more are not uncommon in old males. A short and stocky limb structure makes the jaguar adept at climbing, crawling and swimming. The head is robust and the jaw extremely powerful. The jaguar hunts wild animals weighing up to 300 kilograms (660 lb) in dense jungle, and its short and sturdy physique is thus an adaptation to its prey and environment. 

[Image: jaguar_by_alannahily-d34ju3t.jpg]

Muskox - Ovibos moschatus
The muskox (Ovibos moschatus, musk ox) is an Arctic mammal of the family Bovidae, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor emitted by males, from which its name derives. This musky odor is used to attract females during mating season. Muskoxen primarily live in Arctic North America and Greenland, with small introduced populations in Sweden, Siberia and Norway. As members of the subfamily Caprinae of the family Bovidae, muskoxen are more closely related to sheep and goats than to oxen, but are in their own genus, Ovibos (Latin: "sheep-ox"). Both sexes have long curved horns. Muskoxen stand 1.2 m (4 ft) high at the shoulder on average, with females measuring 135 to 200 cm (4.4 to 6.6 ft) in length, and males 200 to 250 cm (6.6 to 8.2 ft). Adults, on average, weigh 285 kg (600 lb) and range from 180 to 400 kg (400 to 900 lb). Their life expectancy is 12–20 years. The thick coat and large head often suggests a larger animal than the muskox truly is, but heavy zoo-kept specimens have weighed up to 650 kilograms (1,400 lb).

[Image: Male-muskox-in-tundra-habitat-winter-coat.jpg]



(02-11-2019, 03:44 PM)Aztec Wrote: Pantanal Jaguar vs Muskox
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
I believe the jaguar will get killed by the much larger ungulate in a face to face fight. Barren ground grizzlies have been killed by this ungulate. Still the jaguar is capable of killing most musk oxens except the exceptionally large ones between 1000 to 1400 pounds.
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#3
Well they have been killed very rarely if not never, and muskox can never get above 400kg in the wild.


Quote:Grizzly Bear Predation On Muskox The muskox (Ovibos moschatus) is a large ungulate (the average male weight is from 273 to 364 kg [600 to 800 pounds]) equipped with curved horns and a shaggy pelage which can be up to 10 cm (4 inches) thick. It is a close relative of the sheep or goats (subfamily Caprinae) and is able to withstand incredibly frigid, arctic conditions (down to at least – 70 ºF). Muskox tend to live in herds and are famous for their defensive posturing – they often form a defensive circle with their heads (i.e., armament) facing outward toward the potential threat. Youngsters often hide amongst the adults for protection. The barren-ground grizzly bears and muskox overlap in their distribution in northern Canada and Alaska. This shaggy beast would appear to be fairly impervious to grizzly attack. But, this is not the case. Grizzlies were originally reported feeding on muskox by early explorers and with recent reintroduction of these ungulates in parts of the Arctic, there have been a number of papers written on the predator-prey relationship of U. arctos and O. moschatus. Below I have reviewed what is known about the barren-ground grizzly predation on muskox. Multiple Hunting Strategy: In the Thelon Game Sanctuary, grizzlies and muskox coexist, but the relationship is not always copasetic. Near the Thelon River, bears may use thick willow stands along the waterway to ambush muskox feeding on sedge in nearby clearings. Willows also attract muskox, as it is a preferred food of this beast. Gunn and Miller (1982) report finding a bear on a freshly killed, bull O. moschatus. They were able to scare the adult bear off and examine its kill and concluded that the bear had dispatched the big ungulate by first grasping its nose (crushing the nasal turbine bones and tearing off the nose in the process) and then inflicting a crippling bite to its skull. By grasping the nose, the bear may have prevented the muskox from bringing its horns to bear and also may have been more effective at throwing the animal to the ground. In another study carried out in the northeastern Arctic slopes of Alaska, 92 grizzly-muskox interactions were observed (Reynolds et al. 2002). Fifty percent of these were known kills, 40 % were possible kills or scavenging events, and 10 % were incidents where a grizzly was seen chasing muskox. It was estimated that 16-39 % of muskox mortality was the result of bear predation. During the study period (1982-2001) the number of muskox killed by grizzly bears was zero to two deaths per year before 1993, one to four musk ox per year from 1994-1997 and five to ten deaths per year from 1998-2001. This increase in kill numbers was a function of an increase in the size of musk ox herds. An increase in kills may also be indicative of the bears learning how to better attack and take down these big, formidable animals. While solitary adult bears were most often seen attacking muskox (69 occasions), pairs or trios of adult bears were seen chasing, killing or eating these animals (three episodes). Sows with cubs or yearlings were seen interacting with muskox on three occasions. Surplus Killing: Grizzly bears sometimes engage in surplus killing of muskox. In the study carried out by Reynolds et al. (2002) there were ten episodes where one to three bears killed from two to four adult muskox. On several occasions even more muskox were dispatched during a single hunting bout. For example, in one case five individuals (two adult females, a yearling and unsexed adult musk ox) were incapacitated by a single bear. In another case, a grizzly killed four calves and in another incident the victims were one adult female, one two-year old male and one yearling. In most cases, solitary bears were involved in these killing sprees, but in one case three grizzlies instigated the melee. Clarkson et al. (1993) reported a fascinating case of surplus killing of muskox calves by a heterosexual pair of adult grizzlies. Within a distance of about two km, the two bears took down five young musk ox. By doing a little forensic work, the researchers were able to put together a likely picture of what had happened. Rather than form a defensive circle to try and parry the bear attacks, this herd of musk ox tried to out run the grizzlies. The researchers postulated that the calves trailed behind the adults and, therefore, were more vulnerable. The two bears chased the herd, which consisted of 40 to 50 muskox (with a minimum of eight calves). They killed the first calf and ate 90 % of the carcass. They then chased the herd down again and about 1.5-2.0 km from the first kill dispatched a second young musk ox. They ate 60 % of this second calve and began the hunt again. They killed the third calf about 300 m from the second. The third calf was about 30 % consumed by the bears and a wolverine (Gulo gulo) that was feeding on the carcass when the researchers arrived on the scene. The fourth calve was killed 400 m from the third. A golden eagle had just begun to feed on calf four when the researchers arrived. The final calf was killed about 200 m from the fourth – this last young muskox was not eaten either.
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#4
An awesome match, really even, but I'd give the ox a slight edge.
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#5
Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.
[Image: images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcT3njqF11jQ7D2WpTr-l...iTQwMphaum]
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#6
(02-12-2019, 10:48 AM)Uncia Wrote: Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.

Who do you favor face to face?
                               [Image: MG_6373-960x500_c.jpg]
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#7
I doubt that a Pantanal jaguar who has developed his skills despatching feral bulls will fail to also take down a muskox.

Do some posters mistake the defensive powers of muskoxen as being pretty much in the same category as bison/yak?
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#8
Single Wolves have killed adult male Muskox on multiple occassions:

(09-15-2018, 01:01 AM)Taipan Wrote: I would strongly support the wolves here. Its predator prey. Single wolves have killed Bull Muskox, Pairs of wolves have killed Bull Muskoxen. As for the argument that Muskox have killed wolves, I would say the death tally is overwhelmingly favouring the wolves. 

[Image: a3YjfwY.jpg]
Source: Proportion of Calves and Adult Muskoxen, Ovibos moschatus Killed by Gray Wolves, Canis lupus, in July on Ellesmere Island
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#9
(02-12-2019, 12:34 PM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:48 AM)Uncia Wrote: Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.

Who do you favor face to face?
Muskox.
[Image: images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcT3njqF11jQ7D2WpTr-l...iTQwMphaum]
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#10
The jaguar wins, female grizzly bears (similar weight to male pantanal jaguars and less adapted at hunting large prey) have killed adult musk ox and so have lone wolves.

The jaguar is agile enough to avoid most of the musk ox' attacks, can latch onto it with its hooked claws and the jaguar's powerful jaws are better weapons than the musk ox'curved and relatively short horns.
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#11
(02-12-2019, 10:33 PM)Uncia Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 12:34 PM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:48 AM)Uncia Wrote: Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.

Who do you favor face to face?
Muskox.

And then why did you vote for the jag?
                               [Image: MG_6373-960x500_c.jpg]
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#12
(02-13-2019, 12:14 AM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:33 PM)Uncia Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 12:34 PM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:48 AM)Uncia Wrote: Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.

Who do you favor face to face?
Muskox.

And then why did you vote for the jag?
Jaguar's ambush+face to fight chance > Muskox's face to fight chance.

do u understand?
[Image: images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcT3njqF11jQ7D2WpTr-l...iTQwMphaum]
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#13
(02-13-2019, 12:17 AM)Uncia Wrote:
(02-13-2019, 12:14 AM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:33 PM)Uncia Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 12:34 PM)Messi Wrote:
(02-12-2019, 10:48 AM)Uncia Wrote: Face to face fight hard for jaguar.

Muskox skull well-protected and has thick neck.

Anyway, Jaguar wins by ambush, Muskox can win face to face.

Who do you favor face to face?
Muskox.

And then why did you vote for the jag?
Jaguar's ambush+face to fight chance > Muskox's face to fight chance.

do u understand?

You may not know that these fights are only face to face.
                               [Image: MG_6373-960x500_c.jpg]
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