Poll: Who wins?
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Asian Giant Hornet
66.67%
2 66.67%
Megalara garuda
33.33%
1 33.33%
Total 3 vote(s) 100%
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Asian Giant Hornet v Megalara garuda
#1
Asian Giant Hornet - Vespa mandarinia
The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia), including the subspecies Japanese giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica), colloquially known as the yak-killer hornet, is the world's largest hornet, native to temperate and tropical Eastern Asia. Its body length is approximately 50 mm (2 in), its wingspan about 76 mm (3 in), and it has a 6 mm (0.2 in) sting which injects a large amount of potent venom. The head of the hornet is orange and quite wide in comparison to other hornet species. The compound eyes and ocelli are dark brown, and the antennae are dark brown with orange scapes. The clypeus (the shield-like plate on the front of the head) is orange and coarsely punctured; the posterior side of the clypeus has narrow, rounded lobes. The mandible is large and orange with a black tooth (inner biting surface) which is used for burrowing. The Asian giant hornet is a relentless hunter that preys on other large insects, such as bees, other hornet species, and mantises.

[Image: asian_giant_hornet1.jpg]

Megalara garuda
Megalara garuda, known colloquially as the king of wasps, is a large wasp and only species in the genus Megalara, family Crabronidae, tribe Larrini. It was discovered in 2011 by Rosichon Ubaidillah from LIPI (Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia) and Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, on the Mekongga Mountains in the southeastern part of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. It was simultaneously discovered by Michael Ohl, curator and head of entomology at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, in museum collections. In March 2012, a first detailed description was published. The species is named after Garuda, the national symbol of Indonesia, a giant bird-like creature. Males grow up to 2 inches (five-centimeters) long, with females being smaller. It is related to digger wasps: parasitic wasps that sting prey to paralyze them, drag them down into their burrow, and use them as a living food cache for their offspring. The adults are considered solitary predators of insects.

[Image: 440px-Megalara_garuda_male.png]


(02-12-2019, 04:47 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: Megalara garuda vs Asian giant hornet
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
Megalara garuda is unusual in that the males are larger than the females. As formidable as they look, the enlarged mandibles are probably only used to hold onto the female while mating (though it's possible that they are used in ritualized combat with other males). Since male wasps don't have a sting, I don't like its chances against Vespa mandarinia. Vespa mandarinia would have a distinct size advantage over the female Megalara garuda.
[Image: 14359284370_2bbaacf147_b.jpg]
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#3
(02-13-2019, 01:45 AM)dinocat Wrote: Megalara garuda is unusual in that the males are larger than the females.  As formidable as they look, the enlarged mandibles are probably only used to hold onto the female while mating (though it's possible that they are used in ritualized combat with other males).  Since male wasps don't have a sting, I don't like its chances against Vespa mandarinia.  Vespa mandarinia would have a distinct size advantage over the female Megalara garuda.

agree with your statement, i already voted vespa mandarinia (Gaint hornet).

if male Megalara garuda had a stinger then it should be a tough match.
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