Poll: Who wins?
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Crown-of-Thorns Starfish
50.00%
1 50.00%
Morning Sun Star
50.00%
1 50.00%
Total 2 vote(s) 100%
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Crown-of-Thorns Starfish v Morning Sun Star
#1
Morning Sun Star - Solaster dawsoni
Solaster dawsoni, the morning sun star, is a species of starfish in the family Solasteridae. It is found on either side of the northern Pacific Ocean.  The morning sun star has a wide disc and 8 to 13 (usually 11 or 12) long, tapering arms, often with turned-up tips. The upper or aboral surface is smooth, and its colour is usually red, orange, grey, or pale brown, sometimes with paler patches. It grows to a width of about 40 cm (16 in). The morning sun star occurs in the northern Pacific Ocean at depths to about 420 m (1,380 ft). Its range extends from Japan, China, and Siberia to the coasts of North America as far south as California. It is often found in rocky habitats, but can also inhabit other types of seabed. The morning sun star is a predator, feeding mostly on other starfish. It is feared by other stars which move away as fast as they can if touched by a morning sun star. In British Columbia, about half of its diet consists of leather stars (Dermasterias imbricata), which move too slowly to evade it. Other sea stars such as the velcro star (Stylasterias forreri) and the rainbow star (Orthasterias koehleri) fight back at their attacker. They have numerous tiny pincer-like organs called pedicellariae and coil their arms around the morning sun star, nipping it with these. It recoils and its prey often manages to escape. Another sometimes successful defence strategy is used by the slime star (Pteraster tesselatus) which inflates its aboral surface making it difficult for the attacker to get a grip on it and at the same time exudes copious amounts of noxious mucus. Even the often larger sunflower seastar (Pycnopodia helianthoides) retreats when touched by a morning sun star. If grabbed, the sunflower star may leave one of its arms behind, a process called autotomy, sacrificing this limb to make its escape. The morning sun is also a cannibal, feeding on other individuals of its own species, and also feeds on sea cucumbers and diamondback nudibranchs.

[Image: 640px-Solaster_dawsoni.jpg]

Crown-of-Thorns Starfish - Acanthaster planci
The crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci, is a large, multiple-armed starfish (or seastar) that usually preys upon hard, or stony, coral polyps (Scleractinia). The crown-of-thorns receives its name from venomous thorn-like spines that cover its upper surface, or the crown of thorns. It is one of the largest sea stars in the world. A. planci has a very wide Indo-Pacific distribution. It is perhaps most common in Australia, but can occur at tropical and subtropical latitudes from the Red Sea and the east African coast across the Indian Ocean, and across the Pacific Ocean to the west coast of Central America. It occurs where coral reefs or hard coral communities occur in this region. The body form of the crown-of-thorns starfish is fundamentally the same as that of a typical starfish, with a central disk and radiating arms. Its special traits, however, include being disc-shaped, multiple-armed, flexible, prehensile, and heavily spined, and having a large ratio of stomach surface to body mass. Its prehensile ability arises from the two rows of numerous tube feet that extend to the tip of each arm. In being multiple-armed, it has lost the five-fold symmetry (pentamerism) typical of starfish, although it begins with this symmetry in its life cycle. Adult crown-of-thorns starfish normally range in size from 25 to 35 cm (9.8 to 13.8 in). They have up to 21 arms. Although the body of the crown of thorns has a stiff appearance, it is able to bend and twist to fit around the contours of the corals on which it feeds. The underside of each arm has a series of closely fitting plates which form a groove and extend in rows to the mouth. They are usually of subdued colours, pale brown to grey-green, but they may be garish with bright warning colours in some parts of their wide range. The adult crown-of-thorns is a carnivorous predator that usually preys on reef coral polyps.

[Image: 384px-CrownofThornsStarfish_Fiji_2005-10-12.jpg]




(03-15-2019, 09:37 PM)Old Tibetan Blue Bear Wrote: Morning sun star vs Crowned of thorn starfish
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#2
This is a good matchup. Both starfish hunt other starfish and few animals prey on these two. Most starfish will retreat from the morning sun star and that includes the larger sunflower starfish. The crowned of thorn starfish might be smaller but it is more heavily armed. Yet starfishes eat sea urchins which are just as heavily armed.

(03-16-2019, 08:41 PM)Uncia Wrote: Star Wars: Episode 9
Which one do you vote for?
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OldMan
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#3
Crown looks more horrible Tibetan.
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#4
Totally agree with you but the sunflower starfish eats heavily protected sea urchins and yet the large sunflower starfish is preyed upon by the smaller morning sun star so having spines doesn't guarantee victory for the starfish.
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OldMan
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#5




The crowned of thorn starfish seems to be venomouse.





The giant sunflower starfish running from the smaller morning sun star.
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OldMan
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#6
Crown star fish seems too scary and bulkier in size.
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#7
The morning sun star is slightly larger 40 cm vs 25 to 35 cm.
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OldMan
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#8
(03-17-2019, 08:34 AM)Old Tibetan Blue Bear Wrote: The morning sun star is slightly larger 40 cm vs 25 to 30 cm.

I read that info but still i pretty sure crown will defeat sun star, as their weapon's are seem more scary and venomous.
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#9
[Image: Northern_seastar%2C_Asterias_vulgaris%2C...urchin.jpg]

Northern starfish eating sea urchin 

[Image: giant-spined-star_7688318244_o.jpg]
Giant spined star eating sea urchin

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Giant spined starfish preying on a sea urchin.

In the starfish world, spines are not the answer for winning.
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OldMan
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#10
Crown with human.

Size..

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#11
The crowned of thorn starfish is sadly endangered.
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OldMan
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