Poll: Who wins?
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Fisher
33.33%
1 33.33%
Common Raccoon
66.67%
2 66.67%
Total 3 vote(s) 100%
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Fisher v Common Raccoon
#1
Fisher - Pekania pennanti
The fisher (Pekania pennanti) is a small, carnivorous mammal native to North America. It is a member of the mustelid family (commonly referred to as the weasel family), and is in the monospecific genus Pekania. The fisher is closely related to, but larger than the American marten (Martes americana). The fisher is a forest-dwelling creature whose range covers much of the boreal forest in Canada to the northern United States. Names derived from aboriginal languages include pekan, pequam, wejack, and woolang. It is sometimes misleadingly referred to as a fisher cat, although it is not a cat. Males and females look similar. Adult males are 90 to 120 cm (35–47 in) long and weigh 3.5 to 6.0 kilograms (8–13 lb). Adult females are 75 to 95 cm (30–37 in) long and weigh 2.0 to 2.5 kg (4–6 lb). The fur of the fisher varies seasonally, being denser and glossier in the winter. During the summer, the color becomes more mottled, as the fur goes through a moulting cycle. The fisher prefers to hunt in full forest. Although an agile climber, it spends most of its time on the forest floor, where it prefers to forage around fallen trees. An omnivore, the fisher feeds on a wide variety of small animals and occasionally on fruits and mushrooms. It prefers the snowshoe hare and is one of the few animals able to prey successfully on porcupines. Despite its common name, the fisher rarely eats fish.

[Image: 640px-Fishers_%2814791070753%29.jpg]

Common Raccoon - Procyon lotor
The raccoon, Procyon lotor (sometimes spelled as 'racoon'), also known as the common raccoon, North American raccoon, northern raccoon and colloquially as coon, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. he body weight of an adult raccoon varies considerably with habitat; it can range from 2 to 14 kilograms (4 to 30 lb), but is usually between 3.5 and 9 kilograms (8 and 20 lb). The smallest specimens are found in Southern Florida, while those near the northern limits of the raccoon's range tend to be the largest. Males are usually 15 to 20% heavier than females. At the beginning of winter, a raccoon can weigh twice as much as in spring because of fat storage. It is one of the most variably sized of all mammals. The largest recorded wild raccoon weighed 28.4 kg (62.6 lb) and measured 140 cm (55 in) in total length, by far the largest size recorded for a procyonid. The raccoon is usually nocturnal and is omnivorous, with a diet consisting of about 40% invertebrates, 33% plant foods, and 27% vertebrates. It has a grayish coat, of which almost 90% is dense underfur, which insulates against cold weather. Two of its most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws and its facial mask, which are themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes. Raccoons are noted for their intelligence, with studies showing that they are able to remember the solution to tasks up to three years later.

[Image: 640px-Curious_Raccoon.jpg]
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
at parity fisher win, at average would be 50/50 at max raccon.
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#3
(04-15-2019, 11:52 PM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: at parity fisher win, at average would be 50/50 at max raccon.

Why? Raccoons are very tough animals.
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#4
(04-16-2019, 12:01 AM)Taipan Wrote:
(04-15-2019, 11:52 PM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: at parity fisher win, at average would be 50/50 at max raccon.

Why? Raccoons are very tough animals.
Raccoons are tough animal as defender, i read many articles where raccoons attack and kill dogs and cats.
And saw few videos where raccoons can defeat fishers, martens and bob cat.

raccoons skull are impressive and wider then fishers. At max can easily defeat or kill fishers. Raccoon capability as predator are low but max weight would be edge for him.
[Image: ce80d0ccd0fa3ce472195f997a84775a.jpg]

[Image: raccoon3.jpg]
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#5
Now that's an interesting match. Thank you master Taipan.

5kg Fisher vs 7-9kg Raccoon.
Fisher is a way better predator and killer than a Coon, plus has the incredible agility and endurance of the weasel family. It is surely capable of killing bigger animals than itself.
On the other hand the Procyon is as much as durable and has a way tougher defense; it is really difficult to injure a Coon. Plus, as we know from encounters with cats and even big dogs, the Raccoon is dangerous: its teeth and claws may not be one-shot killer weapons but they are nasty business; and above all, one its greatest asset is its strength: its forearms power is out of proportion to its size; there's a report of a Coon capable of clinging to a tree with a 200pounds man hung onto its tail -until the Procyon won the arm\tail-wrestling and escaped.

So, to me the Coon is the perfect counter for a mustelid, and it wins both at average and max size. At parity, it's more even, slightly towards the Fisher. Maybe.
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#6
I'd honestly favor the Fisher quite a lot at parity. Sure the arms are strong, but getting a Mustelid off your neck is a tough deal, even if the Raccoon had almost twice the size advantage on its side.
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#7
Fisher gets attacked by Raccoon. 



[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#8
(04-16-2019, 01:39 AM)Ryo Wrote: I'd honestly favor the Fisher quite a lot at parity. Sure the arms are strong, but getting a Mustelid off your neck is a tough deal, even if the Raccoon had almost twice the size advantage on its side.

Yes, maybe. I'm not really sure about parity, actually.
Okay, if it was only about the attacking abilities, yes at parity it would be a clear win for the Fisher. But to me what makes the fight even is Raccoon's defensive toughness. Getting rid of a mustelid is incredibly difficult, I know it, but injuring a Coon is as much as hard. And despite the Fisher being structurally bulkier than a Marten, even at parity it is less tough than the Raccoon, which may not be as dangerous as a Fisher, but is still nasty.
That's why I see it as even at parity, slightly leaning towards the Fisher for its attacking skill. No more than 60\40.
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#9
Female cat fights raccoon. Female cats are weaker and smaller than male cats (I have a male and female cat). Raccoons are not as strong as humans think ("they kill cats and dogs, bobcats"). They are dangerous in water / Pack of raccoons are dangerous. Female / male bobcat will kill any raccoon. 



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#10
That's complete BS, no 20lb Bobcat, male or female, is going to do anything but get its ass royally whipped by a 30+lb Raccoon. As far as this matchup is concerned, at parity I heavily favor the Fisher, it is a weasel, after all. At average sizes I'd go as far as 50-50, but at max sizes no Fisher is going anywhere near a big boar Raccoon.
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#11
(04-16-2019, 04:12 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote: Female cat fights raccoon. Female cats are weaker and smaller than male cats (I have a male and female cat). Raccoons are not as strong as humans think ("they kill cats and dogs, bobcats"). They are dangerous in water / Pack of raccoons are dangerous. Female / male bobcat will kill any raccoon. 



That was a small raccoon, that despite the entire ordeal was fine. Unfortunately for the cat she had to be later put down due to her injuries. A large male cat would find itself in a similar predicament when faced with the large male raccoon.
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#12
Maybe so, maybe no.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg1sorn3eOM

Our large family cat ( an outdoors hunter) left a fair-sized possum in a similar state,
albeit, he needed a vet check-up for his injuries, too.


Not all youtube clips can be taken at face-value, either.
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#13
(04-16-2019, 02:29 PM)Brogan Wrote: That's complete BS, no 20lb Bobcat, male or female, is going to do anything but get its ass royally whipped by a 30+lb Raccoon.  As far as this matchup is concerned, at parity I heavily favor the Fisher, it is a weasel, after all.  At average sizes I'd go as far as 50-50, but at max sizes no Fisher is going anywhere near a big boar Raccoon.

exactly at max raccoon is nasty fat ass no chance for fisher.
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#14
(04-16-2019, 04:48 PM)Mondas Wrote: Maybe so, maybe no.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg1sorn3eOM

Our large family cat ( an outdoors hunter) left a fair-sized possum in a similar state,
albeit, he needed a vet check-up for his injuries, too.


Not all youtube clips can be taken at face-value, either.
I don't think this cat had contact with the raccoon in that video. It doesn't have a single mark on it. Even in the near impossible case where the cat somehow managed to kill the raccoon without any harm, the cat should have some form of blood on it when you consider the raccoon is drenched in blood.

How injured was your cat? I'm actually shocked that the oppssum was able to inflict some damage. They seem so I'll equipped to make a decent offense or defence.

And going back to the male raccoon vs male cat, I wouldn't favor the cat. Even that freak of a specimen, whose skull I posted wouldn't be able to handle a boar coon. Sure the cat could do some superficial damage, but it lacks a real means to kill the bulky raccoon. If the raccoon doesn't outright kill the cat, the cat will definitely run out of steam and become helpless afterwards.
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#15
But in that vid, the cat who probably did the deed, hasn't actually shown up yet, no?

& I perhaps should have stated, in the case I noted, mature Australian possums are quite feisty critters.

Also, 'house cats' cats can certainly run on a continuum, from pampered pussies, to veritable neighbourhood thugs, too.
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