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Smilodon fatalis
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Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae
#1
Smilodon fatalis
Smilodon fatalis ("the deadly knife-tooth") is possibly the best-known of the machairodontine saber-toothed cats. 
It appeared in North America about 1.6 million years ago and later migrated down the west coast of the continent to Peru. It became extinct around 10,000 years ago. This species is estimated to have ranged from 160 to 280 kg (350 to 620 lb). Particularly large specimens could weigh 350 kg. Their teeth are about 7 in. Although the saber-toothed cat has no close living relatives, paleontologists reconstruct how the saber-toothed cat looked by comparing its bones with those of large cats living today. Very powerful front legs and a short tail indicate that saber-toothed cats used stealth and ambush rather than speed to capture their prey. Recent investigations suggest that this saber-toothed cat probably used its long canines to slash through the throat, severing the wind pipe and cutting the jugular. Its teeth were surprisingly delicate and could easily snap off if a prey animal struggled. Its mouth could open up to 120 degrees, whereas its closest living relative, Panthera leo, or lion, can only open its jaws to 65 degrees.

[Image: smilodon_fatalis_fullview_by_dantheman9758-d3dhscv.jpg]

Xenosmilus hodsonae
Xenosmilus is a genus of extinct Machairodontinae, or saber-toothed cat. Two fairly intact specimens were found by amateur fossil hunters, in 1983 (1981 by some sources) in the Haile limestone mines in Alachua County, Florida. In 1994 the fossils were examined, and it was decided that the cats were of an entirely new genus, which has been placed under the tribe Machairodontini. They lived about 1 million years ago, but as there are only two specimens of the same age, when they appeared and when they became extinct is unclear. Currently, there is only one species known, X. hodsonae.Physically, the cat measured between 1.7-1.8 m long with a highly muscular body, even more muscular than any other cat alive or dead, and the animal probably weighed around 230-400 kg or 230 - 300 kg depending on the source. Before their discovery, all known saber-toothed cats fell into two general categories. Dirk toothed cats had long upper canines and stout legs. Scimitar toothed cats had only mildly elongated canines, and long legs. Xenosmilus broke these groupings by possessing both stout muscular legs and body, and short broad upper canines.

[Image: xenosmilus-hodsonae.jpg]


[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
i believe Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup!
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#3
(04-17-2019, 12:00 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: i believe Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup!

I converted this thread from S. populator to S. fatalis v X. hodsonae for a fairer matchup!
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#4
(05-09-2019, 09:20 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(04-17-2019, 12:00 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: i believe Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup!

I converted this thread from S. populator to S. fatalis v X. hodsonae for a fairer matchup!

its pretty close match, hardly to suggest the winner IMO this match end up 50/50. 
both cats are robust, muscular with powerful skull and teeths.
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
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#5
(05-10-2019, 02:35 AM)Sher Khan Wrote: This is a solid 50-50. I don't think either animal has any significant advantages over the other.

yeah the most closest match for 50/50.
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#6
Xenosmilus, when described by reliable sources, is not quite as robust as S. fatalis, nor quite as big, and though it had teeth less inclined to breakage (theoretically), S. fatalis is still known to, at least not uncommonly, attack other Smilodon and administer lethal or almost-lethal skullbites, not seeming to totally care about their sabres.

This is a fairer match, but I still back the Smilodon.
[Image: 5u3d6w.jpg]
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#7
(05-10-2019, 02:33 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote:
(05-09-2019, 09:20 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(04-17-2019, 12:00 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: i believe Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup!

I converted this thread from S. populator to S. fatalis v X. hodsonae for a fairer matchup!

It's a pretty close match, hardly to suggest the winner. IMO this match end up 50/50. 
Both cats are robust, muscular with powerful skulls and teeth.
This may be a 50/50, but for different reasons.
Smilodon may be physically stronger but Xenosmilus has a notably more deadly bite. It's teeth functioned more like a shark's than like a cat's.
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