Poll: Who wins?
You do not have permission to vote in this poll.
Smilodon populator
40.00%
2 40.00%
Xenosmilus hodsonae
0%
0 0%
Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup.
60.00%
3 60.00%
Total 5 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Smilodon populator v Xenosmilus hodsonae
#1
Smilodon populator
Smilodon, often called a saber-toothed cat or wrongly a saber-toothed tiger, is an extinct genus of machairodonts. This saber-toothed cat was endemic to North America and South America, living from near the beginning through the very end of the Pleistocene epoch (2.5 mya—10,000 years ago). Smilodon populator ("Smilodon the Devastator"), 1 million-10,000 years ago; occurred in the eastern parts of South America and was the largest species of all machairodonts. It was much larger than its cousins, S. fatalis and S. gracilis, possessing a massive chest and front legs, and is the largest known variety of saber-toothed cat. It was more than 1.40 m (55 in) high at the shoulder, 2.6 m (100 in) long on average and had a 30 cm (12 in) tail. Smilodon populator was substantially heavier and larger than any extant felid, with a body mass range of 220–360 kg. Particularly large specimens of S. populator almost certainly exceeded 400 kg in body mass. Its upper canines reached 30 cm (12 in) and protruded up to 17 cm (6.7 in) out of the upper jaw. Genetic evidence suggests that Smilodon populator and other members of the genus diverged from the main lineage of modern cats (subfamily Felinae) around 14-18 million years ago.

[Image: smilodon_populator_by_romanyevseyev-d4whlsr.jpg]

Xenosmilus hodsonae
Xenosmilus is a genus of extinct Machairodontinae, or saber-toothed cat. Two fairly intact specimens were found by amateur fossil hunters, in 1983 (1981 by some sources) in the Haile limestone mines in Alachua County, Florida. In 1994 the fossils were examined, and it was decided that the cats were of an entirely new genus, which has been placed under the tribe Machairodontini. They lived about 1 million years ago, but as there are only two specimens of the same age, when they appeared and when they became extinct is unclear. Currently, there is only one species known, X. hodsonae.Physically, the cat measured between 1.7-1.8 m long with a highly muscular body, even more muscular than any other cat alive or dead, and the animal probably weighed around 230-400 kg or 230 - 300 kg depending on the source. Before their discovery, all known saber-toothed cats fell into two general categories. Dirk toothed cats had long upper canines and stout legs. Scimitar toothed cats had only mildly elongated canines, and long legs. Xenosmilus broke these groupings by possessing both stout muscular legs and body, and short broad upper canines.

[Image: xenosmilus-hodsonae.jpg]



(04-16-2019, 11:57 AM)OldGreenVulture Wrote: (2) smilodon gracilis vs smilodon populator.

Even two S. gracilis's would struggle against S. populator. Can we try this one? I can change it to S. fatalis if S. populator is too heavily favoured.
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
Reply
#2
Smilodon stomps..

I don't think any big cat can kill a populator in history..
Reply
#3
(04-16-2019, 10:57 PM)Uncia Wrote: Smilodon stomps..

Can I ask you to stop saying 'stomps' in almost every matchup. Thanks.
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
[-] The following 3 users Like Taipan's post:
  • Mondas, ScottishWildcat, Sher Khan
Reply
#4
I find it hard to decide between the two sabre toothed cats as both look equally mascular and have the same weaponary.

Plus they are both in the same weight range.
[Image: bzvulture_max-br_1.png]
OldMan
Reply
#5
Xenosmilus is slightly below S. fatalis in overall proportions and would’ve been closer to said animal’s weight range, so I don’t see it winning against S. populator. It’s probably apples to oranges, but it would be like a tiger versus a leopard imo.
[Image: 5u3d6w.jpg]
[-] The following 1 user Likes zergthe's post:
  • Mondas
Reply
#6
i believe Smilodon fatalis v Xenosmilus hodsonae would be a closer matchup!
[Image: t70ok8.jpg]
Reply
#7
(04-16-2019, 11:05 PM)OldGreenVulture Wrote: I find it hard to decide between the two sabre toothed cats as both look equally mascular and have the same weaponary.

Plus they are both in the same weight range.

(04-16-2019, 11:41 PM)zergthe Wrote: Xenosmilus is slightly below S. fatalis in overall proportions and would’ve been closer to said animal’s weight range, so I don’t see it winning against S. populator. It’s probably apples to oranges, but it would be like a tiger versus a leopard imo.

No context has described that S.fatalis has the superior proportions to X.hodsoane.
I don't know where that idea came from.
Reply
#8
Quote:I don't know where that idea came from.
It came from the fact that in any credible source, Xenosmilus is described as being near to, but not necessarily equal to, S. fatalis, let alone S. populator.
[Image: 5u3d6w.jpg]
Reply
#9
Yet that is the reason why i said that give me the credible source that describes the context.
Reply
#10
How about no because I've done that in the past and you outright deny it all?
[Image: 5u3d6w.jpg]
Reply
#11
^ Having done a bit of interesting reading on the subject recently, I must concur with Zergthe.

Ferox ought to either accept Zergthe's considerations, or do some subject appraisal for himself, IMO.
Reply
#12
No, because there are none.
You are simply producing an false attribution fallacy.
Reply
#13
(04-17-2019, 08:05 AM)Ferox Wrote: No, because there are none.
You are simply producing an false attribution fallacy.

^ Dude, be serious, & go do a 'Google Scholar' search, papers on S-T feliforms are legion there!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)