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Does being a vegetarian/vegan make you more ethical?
#16
(06-19-2019, 08:10 AM)Mustang Wrote: "An average vegan diet would be one that is poorly balanced. While it is hard to get the wrong vegetables, it is easy to get not enough of the good ones."

Not really. Your statement makes it sound as though if just eating more would magically solve the issue of vegan diets being lacking in nutrients which is simply not the case.
Em, with the exception of vitamin B12 (and vitamin D, but you can get that from sunlight), you can replace nearly any nutrient you would otherwise lack with a well-balanced vegan diet. Iron is a good example. Many plants like beans or nuts contain iron, yet this is a nutrient many vegans lack.

A point about supplements I forgot to make was that most farm animals get vitamin B12 supplements, too, so there isn't really a way around them either way.
Quote:Then it seems that you misread the whole post, as not only you're the only person who seems to have gotten that vibe, but I don't have such beliefs at all. My point is to say that most people who make the choice to become vegan/vegetarian do so for silly reasons and go about it the wrong way, how is that turning humans back to primitives?
Hm, maybe I was a bit prejudiced from discussions with people who did think that way (like Grazer or Grazier or whatever from the old Carnivora), sorry.

Good that we can drop that point.
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#17
Quote:What you said about evolution being blind makes no sense to me too with all due respect, it ain't blind, otherwise it wouldn't be called natural selection, and natural selection isn't blind at all on the grand scheme of things, it allows the individuals best suited for the survival of the species to continue existing and pass their genes, calling that blind is certainly incorrect or inaccurate.

The term "selection" doesn't imply that someone selects which species survive and which do not. It only implies that not all species survive. The reason why Darwin invented this theory was to find a logical explanation for evolution happening blindly instead of the former mainstream theory that it is controlled by a conscious force.
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#18
Chinese koreans indonesians eat dogs cats. This is the same (meat-eating). We can kill and eat humans. Because all food is alive.

Those who practice meditation they don't eat meat. Eating meat lowers vibrations. +Alcohol, chemistry, meat can affect the mental development. Your demons will be pleased.....
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#19
(06-24-2019, 04:48 AM)Forbiddenip Wrote: Chinese koreans indonesians eat dogs cats. This is the same (meat-eating). We can kill and eat humans. Because all food is alive.

Those who practice meditation they don't eat meat. Eating meat lowers vibrations. +Alcohol, chemistry, meat can affect the mental development. Your demons will be pleased.....

I must say if I knew that you were gonna post here I would've expected a most ridiculous post, but this just totally surpassed my worst expectations by a mile. Eating dogs and cats is silly because it is completely inefficient, which is why most ppl don't do it unless they're absolutely desperate. And did you really mention cannibalism?? How is that relevant to this debate at all?

The last paragraph is just...
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#20
(06-16-2019, 02:23 PM)Taipan Wrote:
(06-16-2019, 06:56 AM)Mondas Wrote: ^ True, as is the fact that plants are also reactive, living entities, ( some of which will also be needfully consumed).

Ethical treatment of all living things is fair enough, I dislike seeing pot-plants sadly withering due to lack of attention.

The point i was trying to make is vast areas of the earths surface are cleared for crop production, which once were areas that wild animals lived in.

A bit more on this point:

Quote:Think going vegan means no animals will die? Think again.

Key points:
  • Billions of animals are killed on Australian farms to protect crops, author and farmer Matthew Evans says
  • He challenged vegans to also examine their diets and consider what had died to produce their food
  • However, a Vegan Australia spokesman said it was about "minimising impact", and was scathing of terms like "organic" and "free range"
A growing number of Australians are embracing veganism as they attempt to move toward a more ethical diet.
But while the goal might be worthy, the truth is a little less easy to stomach, says author and farmer Matthew Evans.
The food critic-turned-restaurateur and pig farmer has spent the last few years researching Australia's food industry and has come to an uncomfortable conclusion: animals will die in our name regardless of whether we choose to eat meat.
In fact, he found billions of animals are deliberately killed every year on Australian farms purely to protect fruit and vegetable crops for human consumption.
"I think a lot of vegans probably understand some animals die, but they may not understand the scale," he said.
Mr Evans outlines the impact in his new book, On Eating Meat — which challenges both carnivores and vegans to consider their choices — and cites a number of examples, including:
  • About 40,000 ducks are killed each year to protect rice production in Australia
  • A billion mice are poisoned every year to protect wheat in Western Australia alone
  • Apple growers can kill 120 possums a year to protect their orchards
"So a duck dying to protect a rice paddy for me is not much different for a cow dying to produce a steak," Mr Evans said.
"They are both animal deaths that happen in the name of us being able to eat.
"So there is nothing that we can do that doesn't have an impact on animals."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-03/v...jEOv6QUT9w
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