Poll: Who wins?
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Fishing Cat
50.00%
3 50.00%
Eastern Coyote
50.00%
3 50.00%
Total 6 vote(s) 100%
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Fishing Cat v Eastern Coyote
#1
Fishing Cat - Prionailurus viverrinus
The Fishing Cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized wild cat of South and Southeast Asia. Like its closest relative, the leopard cat, the fishing cat lives along rivers, streams and mangrove swamps. It is well adapted to this habitat, being an eager and skilled swimmer. The fur of fishing cats is olive-grey with dark spots arranged in horizontal streaks running along the length of the body. The underside is white, and the back of the ears are black with central white spots. There are a pair of dark stripes around the throat, and a number of black rings on the tail. An adult fishing cat is about twice the size of a domestic cat, with a head and body length that typically ranges from 57 to 78 cm (22 to 31 in), and a 20 to 30 cm (7.9 to 12 in) long tail. A few much larger individuals have been reported, of up to 115 cm (45 in) in head-body length. Adult fishing cats weigh from 5 to 16 kilograms (11 to 35 lb). They have a stocky, muscular build with medium to short legs, and a short tail of one half to one third the length of the rest of the animal. The face is elongated with a distinctly flat nose and ears set far back on the head.

[Image: 640px-Fishing_cat_amidst_mangroves.jpg]

Eastern Coyote - C. latrans x C. lupus x C. lycaon
The eastern coyote (Canis latrans var.) is a wild North American canine of mixed coyote-wolf and dog parentage. The hybridization likely first occurred in the Great Lakes region, as western coyotes moved east. It was first noticed during the early 1930s to the late 1940s, and likely originated in the aftermath of the extirpation of the gray wolf in southeastern Ontario, Labrador and Quebec, thus allowing coyotes to colonize the former wolf ranges and mix with the remnant wolf populations. This hybrid is smaller than the eastern wolf and holds smaller territories, but is larger and holds more extensive home ranges than the typical western coyote.

[Image: 611px-Coyote-face-snow_-_Virginia_-_ForestWander.jpg]



(06-25-2019, 11:42 AM)Drassodes Wrote: fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus)  vs eastern coyote
[Image: wildcat10-CougarHuntingDeer.jpg]
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#2
This fight should be like mexican jaguar vs grey wolf, 60/40 for fishing cat as they are strongest wild cat IMO. Stocky build,muscular body, larger skull and stromg bite force to crash fishes skull for instant kill and control.
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#3
(06-25-2019, 09:43 PM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote: This fight should be like mexican jaguar vs grey wolf, 60/40 for fishing cat as they are strongest wild cat IMO. Stocky build,muscular body, larger skull and stromg bite force to crash fishes skull for instant kill and control.

I am inclined to agree here, fishing cat has some serious body robustness and a good skull.
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#4
The moment the 'yote realizes he's taken on such 'a different breed of cat', to anything sympatric of similar scale...

It'll be too late - he's no more than goneburger meat - in the grinder, for this real seriously formidable felidae type.
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#5
Amazing how people forget how Coyotes thrive living side by side with Bobcats pretty much everywhere, and I'd rate a 35lb Bobcat over a 35lb fish-eater. In fact, Coyotes displace Bobcats across their range wherever they overlap, not the other way around. I do think a Coyote would need a small size advantage to win against a Fishing Cat, and an Eastern Coyote can get bigger by quite a bit.
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#6
(06-26-2019, 10:19 PM)Brogan Wrote: Amazing how people forget how Coyotes thrive living side by side with Bobcats pretty much everywhere, and I'd rate a 35lb Bobcat over a 35lb fish-eater.  In fact, Coyotes displace Bobcats across their range wherever they overlap, not the other way around.  I do think a Coyote would need a small size advantage to win against a Fishing Cat, and an Eastern Coyote can get bigger by quite a bit.
Coyotes dominate against the  bobcat however at solo bobcat mostly dominate the feild. And for the fishing cat i would edge him over bobcat due to his more stocky, muscular, robust and larger & wider skull. However they are known take down reptiles, mammals, birds instead they are fishing cat by name.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OV3xwgLSCJs
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#7
I cannot see how anyone can rate a Fishing Cat above a Bobcat when you compare size, prey taken, and what other predators they compete and co-exist with. I mean Fishing Cats are one of the 4 cats that cannot completely retract their claws, so it's a less capable grappler than other cats its size to begin with. It's a niche predator, not a generalist, and that usually makes for a less formidable animal.
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#8
I do not believe jaguar vs grey wolf is at all the appropriate analogy here. That would be the case if the clouded leopard was being used, the most impressive small cat by far and one of the most impressive small carnivores overall due to being a small pantherine.

If we use the metrics for Canis rufus for the coywolf (a lot of authors have suggested red wolves are in fact just coywolves) then in terms of robusticity the fishing cat has a tiny advantage to the point of being insignificant. It has a marginally larger one than the coyote. However, this is likely due to a higher AP diameter than other small cats that is possibly / probably as a result of an aquatic environment, as robust limbs aren't needed to catch fish. Both the red wolf and coyote have greater ML diameter than the fishing cat too, which is suggested to be more relevant. There are a number of other small felids too with greater than or equal to ML diameter to the fishing cat.

It's also worth noting coywolves can get quite large too, a lot bigger than 35 lbs.
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#9
Coywolves get bigger than the fishing cat and the fishing cat is more of a generalist contrary to its name. Of course at parity the cat will win and with max the eastern coyote, don’t know if they’re the same is slightly larger at max. Pretty sure the cat wins anyway but since coywolves get biggier and if they are they same its more even at max.
The night is dark and full of terrors
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#10
The coywolf has a decisive size advantage. This isn't even a fair fight.
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#11
Are coywolf and eastern coyote the same if so than i agree if not the fishing cat takes it.
The night is dark and full of terrors
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#12
(06-27-2019, 12:23 AM)Canidae Wrote: I do not believe jaguar vs grey wolf is at all the appropriate analogy here. That would be the case if the clouded leopard was being used, the most impressive small cat by far and one of the most impressive small carnivores overall due to being a small pantherine.

If we use the metrics for Canis rufus for the coywolf (a lot of authors have suggested red wolves are in fact just coywolves) then in terms of robusticity the fishing cat has a tiny advantage to the point of being insignificant. It has a marginally larger one than the coyote. However, this is likely due to a higher AP diameter than other small cats that is possibly / probably as a result of an aquatic environment, as robust limbs aren't needed to catch fish. Both the red wolf and coyote have greater ML diameter than the fishing cat too, which is suggested to be more relevant. There are a number of other small felids too with greater than or equal to ML diameter to the fishing cat.

It's also worth noting coywolves can get quite large too, a lot bigger than 35 lbs.

Ehhh, proof of these supposed weights?

(06-27-2019, 12:57 AM)Kazanshin Wrote: The coywolf has a decisive size advantage. This isn't even a fair fight.

Citation heavily required
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#13
(06-27-2019, 05:27 AM)Drassodes Wrote:
(06-27-2019, 12:23 AM)Canidae Wrote: I do not believe jaguar vs grey wolf is at all the appropriate analogy here. That would be the case if the clouded leopard was being used, the most impressive small cat by far and one of the most impressive small carnivores overall due to being a small pantherine.

If we use the metrics for Canis rufus for the coywolf (a lot of authors have suggested red wolves are in fact just coywolves) then in terms of robusticity the fishing cat has a tiny advantage to the point of being insignificant. It has a marginally larger one than the coyote. However, this is likely due to a higher AP diameter than other small cats that is possibly / probably as a result of an aquatic environment, as robust limbs aren't needed to catch fish. Both the red wolf and coyote have greater ML diameter than the fishing cat too, which is suggested to be more relevant. There are a number of other small felids too with greater than or equal to ML diameter to the fishing cat.

It's also worth noting coywolves can get quite large too, a lot bigger than 35 lbs.

Ehhh, proof of these supposed weights?

(06-27-2019, 12:57 AM)Kazanshin Wrote: The coywolf has a decisive size advantage. This isn't even a fair fight.

Citation heavily required
I am also curios to see the proof or citation.

Quote:
Quote:In contrast, the tropical forest dwelling Fishing Cats need bare, pliable footpads for gripping slippery rocks and branches near the water where they feed. Their claws are also very sharp, to aid in catching their slippery prey.
[Image: 718481451_pfvvm-m.jpg]
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#14
(06-27-2019, 05:53 AM)onlyfaizy786 Wrote:
(06-27-2019, 05:27 AM)Drassodes Wrote:
(06-27-2019, 12:23 AM)Canidae Wrote: I do not believe jaguar vs grey wolf is at all the appropriate analogy here. That would be the case if the clouded leopard was being used, the most impressive small cat by far and one of the most impressive small carnivores overall due to being a small pantherine.

If we use the metrics for Canis rufus for the coywolf (a lot of authors have suggested red wolves are in fact just coywolves) then in terms of robusticity the fishing cat has a tiny advantage to the point of being insignificant. It has a marginally larger one than the coyote. However, this is likely due to a higher AP diameter than other small cats that is possibly / probably as a result of an aquatic environment, as robust limbs aren't needed to catch fish. Both the red wolf and coyote have greater ML diameter than the fishing cat too, which is suggested to be more relevant. There are a number of other small felids too with greater than or equal to ML diameter to the fishing cat.

It's also worth noting coywolves can get quite large too, a lot bigger than 35 lbs.

Ehhh, proof of these supposed weights?

(06-27-2019, 12:57 AM)Kazanshin Wrote: The coywolf has a decisive size advantage. This isn't even a fair fight.

Citation heavily required
I am also curios to see the proof or citation.

Quote:
Quote:In contrast, the tropical forest dwelling Fishing Cats need bare, pliable footpads for gripping slippery rocks and branches near the water where they feed. Their claws are also very sharp, to aid in catching their slippery prey.
[Image: 718481451_pfvvm-m.jpg]

Is there a study for fishing cats limb robustness, no?
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#15
There are more than 1 study out there, and I know some claim this one is slightly flawed, but we got this one on the forum https://carnivora.net/showthread.php?tid=2687
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